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Author Topic: Carbon Neutral Buildings  (Read 7380 times)

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AGelbert

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SAFE, HEALTHY, AFFORDABLE, SUSTAINABLE, SUPER DURABLE
« Reply #90 on: August 02, 2019, 08:54:49 pm »
THE BEST HOME BUILDING MATERIAL?

SAFE, HEALTHY, AFFORDABLE, SUSTAINABLE, SUPER DURABLE

INTRODUCING NATURAL BUILDING

The best home building material?

Safe, healthy, affordable, sustainable, super durable building material.

And you’ll never see it at Home Depot.
 

More info here:

http://www.dreamweaverscollective.org/ – The featured builder

https://www.cobworks.com/ – How to classes

http://www.cobcottage.com/ – Treasure chest of info on the subject

Click here to support: The Real Food Channel

https://realfoodchannel.com/the-best-home-building-material/

Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

AGelbert

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✨ ROB GREENFIELD’S SUSTAINABLE LIVING 🎍 PROJECT 🌞


HOW MUCH DO YOU REALLY NEED?
How much do you need to live well…if you don’t need to live large?

A nice place to sleep, a desk, room for some books and a pantry.

And it costs next-to-nothing and it looks like fun. 👍

If nothing else, it would be a great vacation home, or emergency home – for less two weeks in a low rent motel. 

Not bad.

Click here to support: The Real Food Channel

https://realfoodchannel.com/simple-living-illustrated/

THE BRASSCHECK/REAL FOOD 😋 READING LIST

We recommend these books as a foundation for educating yourself about health in the 21st Century.

www.brasscheck.com/video/the-brasscheck-real-food-reading-list/
Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

Surly1

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✨ ROB GREENFIELD’S SUSTAINABLE LIVING 🎍 PROJECT 🌞


HOW MUCH DO YOU REALLY NEED?
How much do you need to live well…if you don’t need to live large?

A nice place to sleep, a desk, room for some books and a pantry.

And it costs next-to-nothing and it looks like fun. 👍

If nothing else, it would be a great vacation home, or emergency home – for less two weeks in a low rent motel. 

This actually looks great. What a wonderful situation he's created. I wish I was young enough and not a **** slave to my creature comforts such that I could do something like this. I like cable TV, wi-fi and coffee on demand too much!

AGelbert

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True CLEAN Energy Freedom 🌞
« Reply #93 on: December 13, 2019, 07:59:14 pm »
Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

AGelbert

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CleanTechnica
Support CleanTechnica’s work via donations on Patreon or PayPal!

Or just go buy a cool t-shirt, cup, baby outfit, bag, or hoodie.

🌞 New Prefab Homes Never Need To Be Connected To The Grid 

February 20th, 2020 by Steve Hanley

Dvele is a manufacturer of prefabricated homes headquartered in Southern California. Building homes in a factory instead of onsite results in higher quality residences that meet all the latest building codes and offer efficient living space that uses a minimum of energy. This week, the company announced that from this point forward, every home it manufacturers will produce its own electricity using solar panels and have a built-in battery storage system, eliminating the need to connect to the electrical grid at all if a customer chooses not to.

Dvele prefab home Image credit: Dvele

With the number of grid interruptions due to the risk of forest fires increasing, many customers are interested in off-grid living. California is the first state to require all new homes to have rooftop solar systems. Adding residential battery storage will help make Dvele homes more competitive in a crowded market.

Dvele has developed a new building envelope with a thermal barrier that ensures any heating or cooling produced in the house stays in the house, according to Curbed.  The company claims its homes need 84% less energy per square foot to operate than a conventional stick built home, which means running totally on solar power is actually achievable.

The company has two primary goals — efficiency and sustainability. Despite having many floor plans and styles to choose from, most of their homes use common modules, which keeps design and construction costs low. It also reduces the amount of waste created and permits the usage of leftover materials in other modules.

“90% of building and material failures happen due to moisture build up,” the company says. “But with the quality of our materials, combined with our building practices that focus on maintaining the integrity of an air-tight building envelope, we can radically minimize air leakage and moisture build-up. This enables our homes to have a significantly longer lifespan and ultimately require less maintenance. In addition to our material waste reduction efforts, we are constantly looking for and incorporating building materials and partners that are committed to sustainable material sourcing.”

Dvele recently showed off its first self-powered prefab home in Ventura, California. See the company website for a sampling of the styles and options available.

https://cleantechnica.com/2020/02/20/new-prefab-homes-never-need-to-be-connected-to-the-grid/
Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

AGelbert

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Jul 15, 2021


DOE To Propose First Efficiency Standards For Manufactured Housing Since 'The Sign'

The Department of Energy may update energy efficiency standards for manufactured homes for the first time since 1994, Utility Dive reports. Strengthened standards for new homes could dramatically benefit the disproportionately low-income population who live in them because manufactured homes use 70% more energy per square foot than traditional houses

A 2016 draft DOE rule would have saved those living in manufactured homes thousands of dollars in energy bills over the lifetime of the home, but the Trump administration did not publish the rule.

The DOE's approach would use a tiered system with stronger efficiency requirements applied to more expensive units in order to limit upfront cost increases and ensure strong cost/benefit savings over the life of the unit. Utility Dive

Agelbert NOTE: Energy use per square foot is the WRONG way to look at manufactured homes. I live in one (see picture above 🤠) and, not only do I use far less energy overall than the average stick built (i.e. "traditional") home in the US, but I use less per square foot as well. Sure, I may be more frugal than most in energy use, but the point, from a national energy use perspective, the one the DOE SHOULD be basing their standards on, is that the average home in the US has TWICE (or more) as much area in square feet to heat and cool and run pipes and wires through (and so on) as the average manufactured home. Consequently, traditonal homes (average size in US is 2,301 square feet) use FAR MORE energy per home than manufactured homes. The "per square foot" metric is 😈 statistical sleight of hand similar to the gamed stats the EIA (Energy 🦕 Information Adminstration) publishes. >:(

My home has 980 square feet. That is LESS than HALF the 2,301 square feet size of an average home. The point is that the larger sized homes should be targeted for tighter standards first, simply because they are the biggest energy use hogs in the US. The 'per square foot' use is a ridiculous metric because ALL homes have a kitchen and a refrigerator and a water heater from the getgo. That means that, as you add square feet of building, your added energy costs are from heating or cooling ONLY, NOT cooking and food refrigeration (NOTE: Energy use on lighting in extra rooms is minuscule compared with kitchen and water heater energy demands.). Thus, as the home square footage increases, the AVERAGE energy use per square foot DECREASES, while the the OVERALL energy use INCREASES.

Anyone with an elementary knowledge of energy use in homes could figure that out. I am certain that the DOE would figure that out if they took the trouble to compute energy use per square foot of KITCHEN (and water heater space) in ALL American homes. THEN those giant freezers and oversized appliances (see: refrigerators, water heaters, etc.) in traditional homes would prove that traditional homes are the ones that actually use more energy (BY FAR MORE THAN 70%!) per square foot.

That said, I agree tighter standards for ALL homes are a good thing. If the government will subsidize solar panels, improved insulation and heat pump installation for the owners of manufatured homes, who are, like me, low income folks, that certainly would be a welcome action.

We manufactured home owners are the least economically able of all home owners to pay the cost of making our homes carbon neutral. Making us the whipping boy of the DOE is exactly the wrong approach to reducing energy use per square foot in homes in the USA.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2021, 05:39:34 pm by AGelbert »
Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

 

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