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Author Topic: Electric Vehicles  (Read 37085 times)

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AGelbert

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February 14, 2022 By BENGT HALVORSON

2022 Tesla Model 3

Tesla tops 10% market share in California—an eighth of EV maker’s global deliveries

SNIPPET:

Heard Californians say that the Model 3 is the new Prius?

No exaggeration, they’re everywhere . Tesla surged to a 10.5% market share in California in the fourth quarter of the year, and it maintained an overall 6.5% market share in California for all of 2021, compared to 2.1% for the U.S. as a whole.

The figures were part of a quarterly report released this past week by the California New Car Dealers Association. According to the fourth-quarter report, also rounding up 2021, Tesla registrations grew by nearly 70% from 2020 to 2021.

Full article:
https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1135057_tesla-market-share-california-ev-global-deliveries
He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. Matt 10:37

AGelbert

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Fwbruay 14, 2022 By U.S. Department of Energy


NREL experts in transportation electrification are helping launch the new Joint Office of Energy and Transportation, a new federal office focused on strategically and equitably expanding EV infrastructure to create a national network so everyone can drive electric.

Agelbert COMMENT:
What we need NOW is to get people in to EVs. The last time I checked, 99.99999% of humans in the USA have electricity in their homes. Yes, a charging network is fine, but it is NOT as imperative as providing a REAL EV subsidy for we-the-people.

THIS is what we need all over the world NOW, but I'll settle for it to start in the USA:

1. All governments must provide an EV for 🦖 gas guzzlers consumer trade in program at no cost to the owner until all on road and off road vehicles that are not fueled by biofuels have been recycled.

2. Small engines, like those used for lawn mowers, leaf blowers or weed whackers are to be outlawed. All ordinances requiring lawns are to be outlawed. All lawn, gardening or snow removal power equipment must to be powered electrically, except for those work vehicles that run exclusively on biofuels (e.g. E100), without any other exceptions or grace period.

HOW will the above be funded? SEE BELOW: 🌞

3. All subsidies for fossil fuels are be declared null and void in every country in the world. All rigs, refineries, tanker trucks, pipelines and other fossil fuel industry plant and equipment are to be recycled within a five year period. The fossil fuel industry stock holders are to shoulder the cost of this. Corporate bankruptcies of fossil fuel corporations will not limit the liability of the corporation stock holders according to a worldwide proclamation of Force Majeure. Executives, board members and all other stock holders will be liable for all recycling costs according to ownership records over the last 50 years.

4. Military budgets are to be limited to no more than 5% of tax receipts. 😁

He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. Matt 10:37

AGelbert

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CleanTechnica

February 15, 2022 By Arthur Frederick (Fritz) HaslerP

Electric Everything, Part 4 — Buses, Trucks, Trailers, And More!

In parts one, two, and three of this “Electric Everything” series, I listed 43 things that have been electrified, mostly in recent years — from tiny scooters to giant ferries and ships, and everything in between. If we want to save the planet, we must electrify everything as soon as possible and convert to clean electricity generation.

Mark Jacobson of Stanford University has written a series of articles with more or less the title “100% Energy from Wind, Water, and Solar.” His first article was published in Scientific American in 2009. In March of 2011, “Providing all global energy with wind, water, and solar power … Part I” was written. In addition, in 2015, Jacobson first published a roadmap of renewable energy from wind, water, and solar (WWS) for all US 50 states. He has since published road maps for providing 100% energy supplies from wind, water, and solar for every US state and 46 countries minute by minute. This is especially relevant because wind and solar are intermittent sources and clean electricity generation must meet demand. We need to build out the electrical grid to transmit clean power over long distances. We also need to build out pumped water storage to fill in the gaps in wind and solar generation. Read Jacobson for the explanation for rejecting nuclear or any other source from the mix.

The bottom line is that Jacobson has presented a path where the entire global electrical energy supply can be derived 100% from clean sources. When first presented, the cost of converting to such a system would have required expenditures on the order of magnitude of what the US spent for WWII. In the meantime, the cost of wind and solar power generation has become so cheap that this conversion will be cheaper than continuing to generate power using fossil fuel.

Conversion from fossil fuel generation to clean generation will happen eventually through normal economics. However, to save the planet, this needs to be accelerated by government subsidies and regulation.

Jacobson makes the case that everything — including all vehicles, building heating, steel production, and cement production — must also be converted to 100% electric power. The states of California and Washington got the message. They have passed regulations that no fossil gas lines can be connected to new construction.

As individuals, we have little power to speed the conversion of industrial sources of power to electricity. However, we can assume that there will be dramatic progress towards clean electrical power generation. We can assume that any electricity we consume as individuals will eventually come from totally clean sources. In the meantime, we can help turn the tide away from fossil fuel toward 100% electric power consumption.

What we can do as individuals is reduce our own consumption of power as much as possible and convert the rest to 100% electricity.

Individuals should start with the biggest or at least the easiest things first:

֍ 1. Upgrade your house to use as little energy as possible through increased insulation, low-heat-loss windows, and sealing of all air leaks.
֍ 2. Convert all light bulbs to LEDs. (LEDs use 1/10 the power of incandescent bulbs.)
֍ 3. Convert gas stovetops to electricity if needed.
֍ 4. Replace all fossil-fuel-consuming vehicles with electric vehicles.
֍ 5. Replace your gas furnace with a heat pump.
֍ 6. Replace your water heater with a heat pump.
֍ 7. Convert all yard and workshop tools to battery electric.
֍ 8. Install solar panels on your roof so that the electricity you use now comes from a clean source and you don’t have to wait for the power grid to become clean.
֍ 9. Install a home electricity storage system from companies like Tesla and Generac for backup power in emergencies and complete independence from your local power company.

Figure 1: Photo taken soon after I had solar panels installed on my house in Lindon, Utah. I could then say: I’m driving my EV on sunshine. March 12, 2016. Photo by Fritz Hasler.

Converting your fossil gas furnace was something I covered in part two. Replacing your gasoline-burning car is covered in parts one, two, three, and four. I installed solar panels on my roof 8 years ago. At that time, it cost $20,000 for my 20 panel system after the federal government subsidy. Solar power prices have dropped almost 90% in the last 10 years, so you could spend much less for a new installation. Even with an electric car, my electric bill is as low as $10/month in the spring when sun is already high in the sky but air conditioning isn’t needed. I have saved many thousands of dollars over the last 8 years.

Challenges for Converting All Vehicles to Electricity

Cost: The cost of EVs is coming down and will reach parity within the next five years. In some classes, they are already at parity. Also, the fuel and maintenance costs for EVs are much lower, so the total cost of ownership is already at parity or far past it.

Cross country driving: The Tesla Supercharging network already makes it practical to drive a Tesla cross-country. Cross-country driving for other brands will be possible in the next five years. Also, Tesla plans to open its Supercharging network to other brands. at least in some regions.

Charging: Those with garages wired for 220-volt service can install “quick charging” for about $200. If needed, it will cost about $500 depending on the distance to run 220 volt AC to your garage. A splitter for the clothes dryer outlet will solve the problem for others. If you live in a condo, work with other residents to get power extended to your parking garage. If getting 220 volt service is prohibitively expensive or impossible, or just not needed, you can charge at 110 volts for local driving and use nearby fast charging or Supercharging for longer trips. Those with on-street parking may be able to run a power cord from the house to the street. Others will have to rely exclusively on nearby fast charging.

Supplemental Products

There are a couple of specific products or concepts that can support electrifying transport that I have not yet covered. See below.

Range Extenders and Electric Trailers

When the first electrified vehicles came out with the Toyota Prius in 1997, the batteries were so small that you were lucky to proceed at idle speed for a few minutes solely on electric power. Enterprising owners rigged up trailers with battery packs or generators to increase the all-electric range of their cars.

Figure 2: EV range extender trailer. Image courtesy of EP Tender.

As you can see in Figure 2, range-extending trailers are still available today for making long trips in short-range cars. From personal experience, I know that I have lost 40% of my range by putting two big e-bikes on the back of my long-range Tesla Model 3. I can still travel cross-country, but I must plan carefully. You can imagine how much range you would lose pulling a decent-sized trailer. The obvious solution is to pull a trailer that has its own electric drive system. One company has developed just the electric drive system, and Air Stream has developed the whole package.

Figure 3: eStream electric drive trailer. Image courtesy of Airstream.

The Airstream eStream senses the speed and acceleration of the towing vehicle and adjusts its power assist accordingly. It also comes with a remote so that you can park the trailer without using the tow vehicle. The battery is big enough to match the range of the towing vehicle.

Everything Electric Updates

Since the first three parts of “Everything Electric” were written, there has been further progress in electrification.

Electric Aircraft

Figure 4: Embraer prototype electric aircraft. Artwork by Embraer.

Numerous companies are now developing vertical takeoff and conventional tube electric aircraft with either battery or fuel cell power sources. Some of the companies are Embraer, Eviation, magniX, Pipistrela, Bye Aerospace, Ampaire, Zunum Aero, and Heart Aerospace. Heart Aerospace has taken orders for 200 planes from United Airlines. Look into those companies’ websites or social media accounts for continuing news on what they are doing. One spicy piece of news regarding Eviation is that, even as it is approaching a historic first flight, the CEO has been ousted.

Electric Freight Locomotives

Figure 5: Rio Tinto orders electric locomotives. Image courtesy of Wabtech.

Especially in North America and Australia, very few routes have overhead pantograph power delivery systems. Therefore, in those areas, another delivery system is needed for electrification. Numerous companies are converting diesel electric freight train locomotives to battery or fuel cell power. Companies like Wabtech are taking orders for e-locomotives in Canada, Australia, and Europe. Just this year already, Wabtech has taken orders from BHP Western Australia Iron Ore (WAIO), Rio Tinto, Union Pacific Railroad, and perhaps others.

Tesla Progress

Figure 6: Tesla Texas Gigafactory. Photo courtesy of Tesla.

Tesla has immense factories in Austin, Texas, and Berlin, Germany, that have completed construction and are on the verge of starting serial production. Both factories have produced a small number of finished Model Y vehicles. Tesla delivered 936,132 vehicles and produced almost as many in 2021. If the Austin and Berlin factories gear up quickly, Tesla should reach a rate of 2 million vehicles/year soon. Auto companies around the world are making massive increases in the number and types of EVs to be produced in 2022 and beyond, still led by Tesla.


EV Market Share Keeps Growing

In December 2021, plugin electric vehicle sales in Norway were 90% of auto sales. In Sweden, they were 54.3%; in Germany, 34.7%; in the Netherlands, 30%; in China, 21.3%; and in California, probably 15%. The world and California have reached the tipping point and the rest of the US will follow soon.

My advice for individuals: Don’t buy another gas vehicleYou don’t want to get stuck with a fossil gasoline car that has no resale value.

Electric Truck Progress

Figure 7: Kenworth electric trucks. Image courtesy of Kenworth.

When Tesla revealed two prototype battery electric semis in 2017, many observers thought the idea was preposterous. In some sense, they were correct, since here we are 5 years later and Tesla has yet to begin serial production. It seems Tesla delivered a few prototypes to PepsiCo recently, but true serial production won’t happen until 2023, because Tesla’s new, denser, more powerful battery cells won’t be prolific enough until then. However, numerous other companies — like Kenworth (See Figure 7), Volvo, Mercedes, Rivian, Chrysler Ram, Arrival, BYD, Daimler, Ford, Nikola, Workhorse — and many others are already building or planning to build battery electric trucks.

Electric School Bus Progress

Figure 8: Electric school buses. Image courtesy of Lion Electric.

There are nearly 500,000 school buses in the US. School buses are only used for a few hours every day and sit idle for hours when kids are at school as well as at night. Many have very short routes. Idling school buses subject young children to harmful combustion products. For these reasons, school buses are an ideal place for electrification. However, as of now, only a very small fraction of US buses are electric drive.

At this time, there are 1700 electric school buses in the US. Most states have at least one or two. California has 850 and Maryland has 331. The important thing is the tide is beginning to turn. The recently passed US Infrastructure Bill allocates $5 billion to upgrade school buses, with half set aside for zero-emission buses. This will mean that we will reach the tipping point on the conversion of school buses from fossil fuel to battery electric.

$6 Billion Contract for New USPS Vehicles: Fossil Gasoline or Battery Electric?

Figure 9: Proposed electric US Postal Service vehicle. Image courtesy of Workhorse.

The USPS has more that 230,000 vehicles. 190,000 are the kind that we see delivering mail 6 days per week. Many of the current vehicles are 35 years old. President Biden has a goal of converting the entire current public and private fleet of vehicles to battery electric drive ASAP. What better way to start than to make all government vehicle purchases 100% electric. There is a $6 billion contract to update the current fleet of USPS vehicles, and Biden would love to see these all be electric. However, under the direction of Postmaster General 🦖 Louis DeJoy, a Trump appointee that Democrats would love to get rid of, the contract has been awarded to Oshkosh Defense, which has specified that only 10% of the new vehicles will be electric.

Will there be a happy ending?
https://cleantechnica.com/2022/02/15/electric-everything-part-4-some-updates/
He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. Matt 10:37

AGelbert

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CleanTechnica

February 20, 2022 By David Waterworth

Will Elon Musk End The Fossil Fuel Industry? Tesla Vs. 🦖 Exxon

Are 🦖 oil and car executives hiding their heads in the sand? (Looking for more oil reserves perhaps?) Is Musk right about the end of the fossil fuel industry? UK-based research and analysis group Rethink Energy (no affiliation with RethinkX) believes so.

In a recent email from Lead Analyst Peter White, he states: “Come 2027/8 the Electric Vehicle sales will overcome the rise of pandemic fossil fuel recovery and oil will get squeezed 💩👍.
Bankruptcy for oil follows swiftly . If total car sales do NOT recover from the pandemic (which I expect) within 5 years, then oil begins to falter sooner. Either way, only one or two oil companies survive 2030, but as ailing players whose time has come. Our forecasts assume total car sales globally recover to pre-pandemic levels in 5 years, and that 2025 or 2026 oil sales get close to 2019 levels, and then fall away rapidly at a rate of 5% per annum (the pandemic was only 9.5%).”

As the graphs above delineate, the oil industry will not recover to pre-2019 levels, and EVs will rule the highways globally long before any bans come into play. It won’t just be in Norway.

Graph courtesy of Rethink Energy.

The potential for global oil infighting inside and outside OPEC+, and the desecration of a number of emerging economies still reliant on oil but unable to compete with Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Russia, and the US as the price falls, will lead to huge international unrest, debt defaults, and falling currencies. A global crash is not out of the question, despite the fact that investors and government debt agencies are perfectly clear that this has been on the cards for a while. It will be its suddenness that will make it so shocking.

Once prices fall, they will never come back, and keeping oil flowing in ever smaller amounts until the last 100 million ICE vehicles are on the world’s roads will prove more than a challenge, with rewards for only a handful of companies employing a relatively low number of people. For all intents and purposes, the oil industry will be in the past and its asset base will be destroyed. From around 2035 onwards, there will be so much wealth creation in the cleantech industry that investors will barely notice the passing of oil, nor gas when it follows it shortly after.

White anticipates the potential of the US EV market accelerating faster than the rest of the globe. New players like Tesla, Rivian, Fisker, and Lucid have optimistic expansion plans. Both Ford and GM are announcing new EVs regularly and are desperate to keep market share. Ford’s F-150 Lightning and Mustang Mach-E are good examples where demand has outstripped production and plans have had to be frequently upgraded.

Volkswagen will soon be building EVs on American soil, and Asian manufacturers are aiming to import as well (Vinfast from Vietnam is a recent example). This year’s Super Bowl had 8 commercials for EVs — and they were worth watching. Automakers are collaborating with battery manufacturers, and many new factories are being built.

By 2036, 100% of all cars sold in the US will be electric vehicles, and by 2037 more than half of all the cars on US roads will be EVs. By 2049, all cars in the US will be zero-emission vehicles, the great bulk of them EVs. We see the US increasing its total car fleet more slowly, but still ending this period just shy of 383 million cars compared to 287 million today. For the first time, this is a report which focuses on the speed at which the EV transition is happening, and doesn’t preserve any optimism for the oil majors just because they are customers. We hope you enjoy it.

Will Musk End Fossil Fuels?

Yes, I think Musk will end the fossil fuel industry, or at least be one of the major destructors.
https://cleantechnica.com/2022/02/20/will-elon-musk-end-the-fossil-fuel-industry-tesla-vs-exxon/

Agelbert COMMENT:
This is not hard. All you have to do is look at where, exactly, the profits made by the hydrocarbon industry come from as shown in the typical oil refinery product output breakdown per barrel of crude oil:


IOW, no fuel profits due to massive EV adoption 👍👍👍, no hydrocarbon industry, period.



He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. Matt 10:37

AGelbert

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Re: Electric Vehicles
« Reply #694 on: March 05, 2022, 05:41:24 pm »
CleanTechnica

March 4, 2022 By Steve Hanley

Honda & Sony Will Build Electric Cars Together

SNIPPET:

“Sony’s purpose is to fill the world with emotion through the power of creativity and technology,” Sony CEO Kenichiro Yoshida said in a statement. “Through this alliance with Honda, which has accumulated extensive global experience and achievements in the automobile industry over many years and continues to make revolutionary advancements in this field, we intend to build on our vision to ‘make the mobility space an emotional one,’ and contribute to the evolution of mobility centered around safety, entertainment, and adaptability.”

Full article:
https://cleantechnica.com/2022/03/04/honda-sony-will-build-electric-cars-together/
He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. Matt 10:37

AGelbert

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March 11, 2022


Solar and wind rollout doesn't depend on Russian exports but e-cars doGerman industry

#Renewables    #Solar    #Wind    #Cars    #Resources & Recycling   

The rollout of solar panels and wind turbines is unlikely to be hampered by supply problems caused by the war in Ukraine, but the production of electric cars could take a hit, German business associations told Clean Energy Wire.

The country's solar and wind industries said they don't depend on supply chains that involve Russia or Ukraine. But the car industry warned that the war is already disrupting production and could interfere with the transition to electric mobility, as battery production depends on Russian nickel.

👉 Read more:

Quote
“War does not determine who is right. Only who is left.” -- Bertrand Russell


He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. Matt 10:37

AGelbert

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MARCH 18, 2022 by ROBERT DUFFER



First drive review: 2023 Subaru ⚡ Solterra sheds Toyota’s skin off-road 🤠

SNIPPETS:

Bridging sun and earth, the 2023 Subaru Solterra arrives late to the electric party, and makes more inroads for the brand than it does for the EV marketplace. Built in partnership with Toyota and mechanically and cosmetically related to the Toyota BZ4X, which is also Toyota’s first mass-produced global electric vehicle, the Solterra lives in the shadow of its twin.

But the Solterra sheds Toyota’s skin doing what Subaru’s are known for: taking its off-road prowess on trail. Getting to the access roads beyond Scottsdale required more everyday driving, and Subaru’s dual-motor system proved adequate if not anodyne. Each 80-kw motor powers an axle, and the 249 lb-ft of torque has a variable split, shifting torque 40/60 between front and rear axles under heavy acceleration, and 70/30 when braking to prevent understeer.

From a stop, it can accelerate to 60 mph in about 6.5 seconds and it’s lighter than some rivals, topping out at 4,505 lb in top Touring trim (the base Premium weighs 4,365). When it comes to acceleration, there isn’t much difference in the normal, Eco, or Sport drive mode settings that can be activated with a simple button push on the console. 

It’s not just remarkably quiet for a Subaru, whose flat-4s can run loud with a CVT, it’s quiet for an electric car , lacking any motor whir. It’s well-insulated from the road as well, with only a bit of highway noise coming from the all-season tires wrapped around the tester’s 20-inch wheels (18s are standard). It rides quietly and composed as well, with MacPherson struts up front and a double-wishbone setup in back, but it can be willowy on undulating terrain. I wasn’t pushing it hard on the paved 90-degree intersections outside Scottsdale, but Solterra owners won’t mistake this for an autocross car, unless or until the STI performance department gets a shot at it. Steering doesn’t provide much feedback, but the small-diameter wheel points and goes where directed. ... ...



Some other oddities about the Solterra, which has Toyota’s DNA all over the cockpit, is that there’s no glovebox and the instrument cluster sits at the end of a plastic tray extending from the front of the dash until it nearly touches the windshield. It feels as distant as a head-up display, and the small power meter alongside Toyota’s even smaller vertical menu bar for vehicle info is an odd use of real estate. The top of the wheel can block some of the display, but seat and steering wheel adjustments resolve it. ... ...

It all felt very Toyota, until the pavement ended 🤠 and the access road descended into the desert valley. Even with all the traction control settings active, the rear tapped out and went a bit sideways on the loose dusty gravel.



It corrected itself quickly, proving its Subaru system, and turning off the first level of stability control gave power back to the driver. The higher-speed off-roading was the highlight of my time in the Solterra, and it proved itself equally capable on more challenging terrain.




With X-Mode set to the Snow/Dirt setting, it climbed up uneven ascents strewn with loose rock and all the dusty desert dirt. A third X-Mode setting called Grip Control behaves like an off-road cruise control so drivers can focus on the obstacles, not the pedals, both uphill and downhill. Three settings between 3 and 5 mph can be controlled through a toggle in the console, and the driver can override the setting with the accelerator, then the system will reactivate once below the threshold. It works well, but must be activated from a stop with the gear setting in drive. When one wheel slipped, or articulated off the ground, the other wheels pulsed and grabbed until it righted itself. It would help newcomers get a taste for deeper off-road terrain and instilled confidence in its abilities. 



Full article:
https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1135358_first-drive-review-2023-subaru-solterra-sheds-toyota-s-skin-off-road

Agelbert NOTE: Green Car Reports has a seriously flawed comment moderation algorithm . SEE comments on their moderation policy, after the happy talk boilerplate, HERE . If you try to complain to a poster that attacks you that he is violating the commenting policy with ad hom, YOU get YOUR post "under moderation" while the abusive 👿 poster's post is left to stand.

So, while the articles are good reading, the comments largely favor a group that says whatever abusive or ridiculous baloney they wish to come up with while everyone who challenges them is "put in moderation".

Enjoy the articles but don't waste your time responding in the comments section.

Agelbert added NOTE: March 21, 2022 UPDATE on irrational, biased, just plain stupid,  "moderation" at Green Car Reports. Today this comment I made two days ago, was removed: 
Quote
AGelbert > john1701a  2 days ago Removed
Mr. Briggs is not, as you can see, objective, knowledge based or reasonable. Thank you, John1701a, for your excellent objective, knowledgeable and reasonable comments.

If the above "violates" any moderation policy anywhere, I'll eat my hat. Mr. Briggs is the 👿 author of the sarcastic and demeaning reply to me that was left to stand.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2022, 06:13:12 pm by AGelbert »
He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. Matt 10:37

AGelbert

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CleanTechnica


March 21, 2022 By Steve Hanley

Electricity Prices Are Up, But An ⚡ EV Is Still Much Cheaper Than A 🦕Conventional Car

SNIPPETS:

The EPA says the average new vehicle sold in the US in 2020 (the latest year for which information is available) had a combined fuel economy rating of 25.7 miles per gallon. Therefore, driving 100 miles in an average vehicle would use 3.9 gallons of gas. The EPA also says the average MPGe rating for 2022 model year EVs sold in the US is about 97. MPGe estimates how far an electric car can travel on 33.7 kWh of electricity — the amount deemed equivalent to one gallon of gasoline. Therefore, driving 100 miles in that hypothetical average electric vehicle would use 34.7 kWh of electricity.

The rest is simple. Calculate the cost of 3.9 gallons of gasoline and 34.7 kWh of electricity over time, then compare them to see which is cheaper. The result? Driving a conventional car 100 miles costs $14 for gasoline on average, but only a little over $5 using electricity. The data also shows the 😈🦖 turbulent price of gasoline versus the relatively steady price of ⚡ electricity . Even in San Francisco, where the cost of electricity is the high, the cost of “fuel” for an electric car is still about a third of an equivalent amount of 🦖 gasoline. ... ...

I saw a T-shirt recently that said, “If you voted for Biden, you owe me gas money.”
📢 Wrong. If you bought a 🦖 gas guzzler, that’s on you.

Full article:
https://cleantechnica.com/2022/03/21/electricity-prices-are-up-but-an-ev-is-still-much-cheaper-than-a-conventional-car/
He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. Matt 10:37

AGelbert

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A detailed look inside the German Tesla factory
« Reply #698 on: March 27, 2022, 02:27:28 pm »
CleanTechnica

March 27, 2022 By Johnna Crider

Video: Inside Look At Tesla’s Giga Berlin


Associated artcle:
https://cleantechnica.com/2022/03/26/video-inside-look-at-teslas-giga-berlin/
He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. Matt 10:37

 

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