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Author Topic: Corporate Mendacity and Duplicity  (Read 5105 times)

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AGelbert

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How "Essential" is Bottled Water? Ep. 6.163
« Reply #90 on: December 09, 2019, 12:02:57 pm »
How "Essential" is Bottled Water? Ep. 6.163
10,191 views•Dec 7, 2019


Steve Lehto
115K subscribers
Michigan court of appeals shoots down the argument that bottled water is "essential" in the same manner as electricity and sewers.

http://www.lehtoslaw.com
Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

Surly1

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Walmart Store Holding Thanksgiving Charity Food Drive -- For Its Own Employees!



Recently, Yahoo’s 24/7 Wall Street column sought to identify the nation’s 10 worst paying employers, based on the methodology ultizied by the National Employment Law Project in its 2012 report, “Big Business, Corporate Profits, and the Minimum Wage.”

To the surprise of nobody, Walmart came out on top, achieving the distinction of being the worst paying company in America.

Still, when it comes to Walmart, there are certain analysts and observers who can’t seem to remove the blinders. They continue to insist that Walmart pays its workers an average of over $18.00 per hour when even the company acknowledges that the average full time, hourly rate is $12.83—and that number includes the salaries of some of the highest paid employees in the averaging such as the CEO who earned $20.7 million last year.

Maybe, at long last, the blinders will come off when these deniers are forced to come to grips with the fact that Walmart associates are paid so poorly that a store in Canton, Ohio, located in the northeastern part of the state, now holds an annual, Thanksgiving drive to collect canned foods for fellow Walmart employees in need.

Walmart spokesperson, Kory Lundberg, thinks this is all just the most wonderful thing—bragging that the drive to collect holiday food for fellow employees shows just how much Walmart employees care about one another.

Do you imagine the spokesperson has yet to realize just how remarkable her statement is?

Surely, those in need at the Canton, Ohio store are benefitting from the good will of some fellow workers who care enough to drop off a can of cranberry sauce to help make their co-workers’ holiday meal a bit nicer, even though they too suffer from earning too little to take care of their own families.

However, what about the other employees at Walmart—say, for example, CEO Mike Duke who could make this in-house charitable effort unnecessary by simply paying his employees a livable wage so that they might afford a decent Thanksgiving dinner on their own?

While spokesperson Lundberg seems to be feeling all ‘Christmassy' as a result of the good works company employees are performing when it comes to their own modern day Tiny Tim story, other employees at the Walmart store in question are not quite so cheery.

One employee, who did not wish to divulge her name for fear of being fired, found the food drive containers in her locker a few weeks ago upon arriving at work. The employee, who found the campaign “demoralizing” and “kind of depressing”, snapped photos of the containers which are now making their way around social media outlets as proof positive of just how bad Walmart’s indifference to their employees' living circumstances has become.

If what is happening at the Canton, Ohio store is insufficient proof that this company’s wages are too low, then there is clearly no measure or metric that could possibly serve to make the point.

Says Kate Bronfenbrenner, director of labor education research at Cornell Univeristy’s school of labor, “That captures Wal-Mart right there. Wal-Mart is setting up bins because its employees don’t make enough to feed themselves and their families.”

Of course, the start of the holiday season will not be grim for everyone at Walmart as there will likely be ample goodies of bonus checks and stock options in the stockings of top employees at the company, as Walmart's net income rose to $17 billion last year.

If your idea of American capitalism is of the "bah humbug" variety, then I'm sure that this story will leave you saying, "They're damned lucky they have a job at all!" But for those Americans who still believe that free enterprise means that working hard at a job should be compensated with a livable wage, I hope you will let your feelings be known.

And if you happen to live in the Canton, Ohio area, drop by and make a contribution. The folks at Walmart who are helping you to pick out that nice turkey for your Thanksgiving family gathering will appreciate your helping to give them some happiness on that day as their own Ebenezer Scrooge of an employer won't be dropping by with a Christmas goose.

Contact Rick at thepolicypage@gmail.com and follow me on Twitter and Facebook.


AGelbert

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Is It Time To Reboot Facebook? (w/ Andrew Behar )
1,301 views•Dec 19, 2019


Thom Hartmann Program
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Is it time to reboot Facebook so the company is no longer a danger to democracies or people? 

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Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

AGelbert

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BLACK BEAR NEWS: 👹 Amazon Warns Employees Who Spoke Out On Climate Change
473 views•Jan 8, 2020


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Amazon Warns Employees Who Spoke Out On Climate Change
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/amazon-warns-employees-climate-change_n_5e0e42bbc5b6b5a713b769a0

A Grim New Definition of Generation X
https://www.commondreams.org/views/2020/01/01/grim-new-definition-generation-x

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Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

Surly1

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Boeing's fired CEO got his $62 million payout confirmed the same day
2,800 people in the 737 Max supply chain were laid off




Kieran Corcoran
9 hours ago
  • Dennis Muilenburg, the recently-ousted CEO of Boeing, is leaving with a $62 million payout, the company said Friday.
  • The substantial award comes despite being fired for poor handling of the fatal crashes, aftermath, and continued suspension from service of the 737 Max.
  • Also on Friday other workers lost their jobs because of the 737 Max: 2,800 employees of Boeing supplier Spirit AeroSystems.
  • Spirit said the workers had to go because there was no work for them in light of Boeing suspending production of the 737 Max while it is grounded.
  • Unlike Muilenburg, they did not get large exit packages, and will instead receive 60 days' pay.
  • Visit Business Insider's home page for more stories.

The recently-fired CEO of Boeing is leaving the company with a package worth $62 million, the company said Friday — just hours after 2,800 workers lost their jobs over the 737 Max disaster.

Payout details for Dennis Muilenburg, who was ousted from Boeing in late December, were made public in a filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission.

Muilenburg lost his job over Boeing's disastrous handling of two fatal crashes by the 737 Max in which 346 people died.

The jet was grounded ten months ago, in March 2019. It has no firm date to return to service and Boeing has stopped building new ones.

On his departure, Boeing stripped him of his bonus, any severance pay, and other incentives worth nearly $15 million.

However, that still left him with a parting package of $62 million made up of Boeing stock, pension payments, and other deferred contributions.

Meanwhile, rank-and-file aviation workers in Boeing's supply chain were cut lose without anything like that kind of compensation.

Earlier on Friday, Spirit AeroSystems, a Kansas-based manufacturer, which gets more than half its revenue from the 737 Max, announced layoffs for 2,800 workers at its Wichita facility.

When Boeing froze the 737 Max production line, it promised not to lay off any of its own staff.

But the loss of work proved devastating for suppliers like Spirit, which said in a statement that the grounding and production freeze left them little.

"Spirit is taking this action because of the 737 MAX production suspension and ongoing uncertainty regarding the timing of when production will resume and the level of production when it does resume," the statement said.

Spirit said it plans to lay off an unspecified number of workers at two plants in Oklahoma, and may also have to shed more workers at its Wichita base if 737 Max production does not recommence.

The laid off are due to receive 60 days' pay, Spirit said.


Surly1

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Big Pharma Won’t Let Us Import Drugs From Canada, But Insists on Sending Carcinogen-Contaminated Pills to the Public

Yves here. I understand the desire of Americans to be able to re-import drugs from Canada. But this is at best an interim strategy, since meaningful orders from Canada could easily cause problems with supplies for Canadians and could thus lead the Canadian government to restrict or bar shipments to the US.

The point would be to pressure the US government to do what every other advanced economy government does: negotiate drug prices. The fact that we don’t when the US provides so much R&D support to Big Pharma is, as Lambert would say, wonderfully clarifying.

By Thom Hartmann, a talk-show host and the author of The Hidden History of the War on Voting and more than 25 other books in print. His most recent project is a science podcast called The Science Revolution. He is a writing fellow at the Independent Media Institute Produced by Economy for All, a project of the Independent Media Institute.

Big Pharma spends a small fortune every year buying politicians to make sure we can’t import prescription drugs from Canada, but they’re more than happy to sell us contaminated medications from countries with weak manufacturing controls and exploitable labor that ensure high profit margins.

A toxic compound that doesn’t belong anywhere near medicine known as NDMA was first discovered in some blood pressure medications in 2018, and the FDA issued an alert and wrote a complaint letter to the raw materials supplier to Big Pharma companies. It turns out the meds follow the very common pattern of being made in India with raw ingredients coming from China. And they are sold by big companies for obscenely high prices to U.S. consumers.

More recently, NDMA contamination provoked a nationwide recall of the popular anti-heartburn medication Zantacand all its generic versions.

And now the world’s most widely prescribed drug of all, which is used to treat and prevent Type 2 diabetes called metformin, is contaminated with NDMA.

NDMA (N-Nitrosodimethylamine) is, according to the World Health Organization, produced by “the degradation of dimethylhydrazine (a component of rocket fuel) as well as from several other industrial processes. It is also a contaminant of certain pesticides.”

And it’s one of the world’s most potent carcinogens, at least for humans and other mammals. Our livers produce an enzyme that converts it to methyldiazonium that then leads to O6-methylguanine, both of which alter a process at the cellular level called methylation that is a cancer turbocharger.

Because it’s such a potent biological agent, NDMA is also extremely poisonous; a Chinese medical student put a few drops in his roommate’s water and killed him. Ditto for a Canadian grad student, who injected it into a colleague’s apple pie.

It’s so poisonous that the FDA has set the “acceptable” amount for human daily intake at 96 nanograms, or 0.000096 of 1 milligram (a single grain of salt is about a milligram). In some of the generic brands of the blood pressure medication, just one tablet was found to have NDMA levels almost 20 times higher than the “acceptable” 96 nanograms, and nearly all were drugs that are taken daily.

Once it gets into groundwater, NDMA is wicked hard to get out, as citizens of numerous California cities found out in the late 1990s. Its “miscibility” (rapid solubility) with water is extreme, meaning that a few drops of it rapidly spreads through miles of underground aquifers or other water supplies in a matter of hours or days at most. Because of this, it’s nearly impossible to isolate the contamination once it happens, the only solution then being radical and expensive water treatment everywhere in the aquafer, principally using ultraviolet light.

Ever since 1987 when Congress and the Reagan administration cut a corrupt deal with Big Pharma to ban the retail import of pharmaceuticals into the U.S., Democrats have pushed to allow Americans to get their prescription drugs from other countries when they’re too expensive here (which is nearly always the case; we pay about twice as muchfor drugs as any other country in the world).

In 2000, Congress passed a law to allow imported retail drugs, but the Clinton administration, heavily funded by the health care industry, killed it administratively.

Nonetheless, progressive Democrats have pushed for years for the elimination of the ban. I first met Bernie Sanders when I lived in Montpelier, Vermont, around the turn of the century and he was organizing busloads of Vermontseniors to travel the two hours to Montreal to fill their prescriptions.

And now, in another popular policy position “borrowed” from progressive Democrats (who have also opposed neoliberal trade deals for decades), the Trump administration is talking about letting American consumers buy drugs from Canada or overseas.

The downside of this is that generic drugs sold in Canada are just as likely to be made in India and China, and thus just as contaminated, as drugs sold here. The upside is that because Canadian drugs will be cheaper, some of us can afford to buy the name-brand versions made in Germany, Switzerland or Ireland and sold in Canada, and not worry about getting cancer from NDMA in our generic drugs. (Yes, I mean this sarcastically.)

There was a time when virtually all drugs sold in the U.S. were manufactured here, including generics, or in Switzerland and Germany. Congress passed a special tax break for American drug manufacturers who’d move their factories to Puerto Rico, and for decades that was the hub of U.S. drug manufacturing. But in past decades neoliberalism has won out, and only a fraction of the pharma facilities in and around San Juan remain in operation.

Trump ran on the traditionally Democratic and progressive position of bringing manufacturing back to the U.S., a project that progressive senators including Sherrod Brown and Bernie Sanders have worked on their entire modern political careers.

It’s time to apply it to manufacturing pharmaceuticals or at least insist on global regulations that can protect everyone.


AGelbert

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Yves here. I understand the desire of Americans to be able to re-import drugs from Canada. But this is at best an interim strategy, since meaningful orders from Canada could easily cause problems with supplies for Canadians and could thus lead the Canadian government to restrict or bar shipments to the US.

The point would be to pressure the US government to do what every other advanced economy government does: negotiate drug prices. The fact that we don’t when the US provides so much R&D support to Big Pharma is, as Lambert would say, wonderfully clarifying.

By Thom Hartmann, a talk-show host and the author of The Hidden History of the War on Voting and more than 25 other books in print. His most recent project is a science podcast called The Science Revolution. He is a writing fellow at the Independent Media Institute Produced by Economy for All, a project of the Independent Media Institute.

Big Pharma spends a small fortune every year buying politicians to make sure we can’t import prescription drugs from Canada, but they’re more than happy to sell us contaminated medications from countries with weak manufacturing controls and exploitable labor that ensure high profit margins.

A toxic compound that doesn’t belong anywhere near medicine known as NDMA was first discovered in some blood pressure medications in 2018, and the FDA issued an alert and wrote a complaint letter to the raw materials supplier to Big Pharma companies. It turns out the meds follow the very common pattern of being made in India with raw ingredients coming from China. And they are sold by big companies for obscenely high prices to U.S. consumers.

More recently, NDMA contamination provoked a nationwide recall of the popular anti-heartburn medication Zantacand all its generic versions.

And now the world’s most widely prescribed drug of all, which is used to treat and prevent Type 2 diabetes called metformin, is contaminated with NDMA.

NDMA (N-Nitrosodimethylamine) is, according to the World Health Organization, produced by “the degradation of dimethylhydrazine (a component of rocket fuel) as well as from several other industrial processes. It is also a contaminant of certain pesticides.”

And it’s one of the world’s most potent carcinogens, at least for humans and other mammals. Our livers produce an enzyme that converts it to methyldiazonium that then leads to O6-methylguanine, both of which alter a process at the cellular level called methylation that is a cancer turbocharger.

Because it’s such a potent biological agent, NDMA is also extremely poisonous; a Chinese medical student put a few drops in his roommate’s water and killed him. Ditto for a Canadian grad student, who injected it into a colleague’s apple pie.

It’s so poisonous that the FDA has set the “acceptable” amount for human daily intake at 96 nanograms, or 0.000096 of 1 milligram (a single grain of salt is about a milligram). In some of the generic brands of the blood pressure medication, just one tablet was found to have NDMA levels almost 20 times higher than the “acceptable” 96 nanograms, and nearly all were drugs that are taken daily.

Once it gets into groundwater, NDMA is wicked hard to get out, as citizens of numerous California cities found out in the late 1990s. Its “miscibility” (rapid solubility) with water is extreme, meaning that a few drops of it rapidly spreads through miles of underground aquifers or other water supplies in a matter of hours or days at most. Because of this, it’s nearly impossible to isolate the contamination once it happens, the only solution then being radical and expensive water treatment everywhere in the aquafer, principally using ultraviolet light.

Ever since 1987 when Congress and the Reagan administration cut a corrupt deal with Big Pharma to ban the retail import of pharmaceuticals into the U.S., Democrats have pushed to allow Americans to get their prescription drugs from other countries when they’re too expensive here (which is nearly always the case; we pay about twice as muchfor drugs as any other country in the world).

In 2000, Congress passed a law to allow imported retail drugs, but the Clinton administration, heavily funded by the health care industry, killed it administratively.

Nonetheless, progressive Democrats have pushed for years for the elimination of the ban. I first met Bernie Sanders when I lived in Montpelier, Vermont, around the turn of the century and he was organizing busloads of Vermontseniors to travel the two hours to Montreal to fill their prescriptions.

And now, in another popular policy position “borrowed” from progressive Democrats (who have also opposed neoliberal trade deals for decades), the Trump administration is talking about letting American consumers buy drugs from Canada or overseas.

The downside of this is that generic drugs sold in Canada are just as likely to be made in India and China, and thus just as contaminated, as drugs sold here. The upside is that because Canadian drugs will be cheaper, some of us can afford to buy the name-brand versions made in Germany, Switzerland or Ireland and sold in Canada, and not worry about getting cancer from NDMA in our generic drugs. (Yes, I mean this sarcastically.)

There was a time when virtually all drugs sold in the U.S. were manufactured here, including generics, or in Switzerland and Germany. Congress passed a special tax break for American drug manufacturers who’d move their factories to Puerto Rico, and for decades that was the hub of U.S. drug manufacturing. But in past decades neoliberalism has won out, and only a fraction of the pharma facilities in and around San Juan remain in operation.

Trump ran on the traditionally Democratic and progressive position of bringing manufacturing back to the U.S., a project that progressive senators including Sherrod Brown and Bernie Sanders have worked on their entire modern political careers.

It’s time to apply it to manufacturing pharmaceuticals or at least insist on global regulations that can protect everyone.


Yep, it turns out that a component of rocket fuel (i.e. NDMA) can rocket cancer in humans. Who coulda knowed, say our venerable pinnacle of human intelligence evolution, superior, smart, sapient, genius (and so on) rocket scientists .

  This is just one more of a nearly continuous exposure of proofs, for the last 150 years or so (SEE: Industrial pollution suicide Revolution), that the Precautionary Principle has been 1000% ignored on behalf of profit over people and planet.


Have a nice day.

« Last Edit: January 11, 2020, 05:38:52 pm by AGelbert »
Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

Surly1

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Debt will kill the global economy. But it seems no one cares

Phillip Inman  Sat 4 Jan 2020 12.00 EST

Warnings from the IMF and World Bank have been dismissed. But even if they are wrong, a demographic crisis looms


IMF logo
The IMF says that large amounts of corporate debt in eight key economies could become unserviceable in the event of a recession. Photograph: Yuri Gripas/Reuters

The warning signs are clear. Debt is rising on every continent and especially in the business sector, which has spent the past decade ramping up its borrowing to previously unheard-of levels.

Last October, the International Monetary Fund said that almost 40% of the corporate debt in eight leading countries – the US, China, Japan, Germany, Britain, France, Italy and Spain – would become so expensive during a recession that it would be impossible to service. In other words, tens of thousands of businesses, employing millions of people, would have gambled with high levels of borrowing and lost, making themselves insolvent.

Worse, the IMF said the risks were “elevated” in eight out of 10 countries that boasted systemically important financial sectors, adding that this situation was a repeat of the years running up to the last financial crisis.

Last month, the World Bank joined in. It said emerging-market and developing economies (EMDEs) had pushed their borrowing to a record $55 trillion (£42tn) in 2018.

Unlike the richer nations already mentioned, the 100 EMDEs across Africa, Asia and South America covered by the report were affected by rising private-sector debt coupled with higher government borrowing. And this extra state borrowing is not only larger, it has also changed in character. First, it has gone from being largely directed to investment spending to, more recently, being used simply to cope with the costs of health, education and welfare. Second, it is being more commonly borrowed from international investors hungry to lend developing countries cash at, relatively speaking, sky-high rates of interest.

There is little evidence that anyone is paying any attention to the dire misgivings expressed by either organisation. This year, the US S&P 500 stock market resumed its long-term (100-year) upward trend following a near 200% increase since 2010. Likewise, the German Dax has soared over the past 10 years from 5,500 to over 13,000 while the Paris CAC 40 has almost doubled to 6,000.

Britain’s main market in shares has struggled to make any headway over the past three years while Brexit uncertainty dominated. Yet the FTSE 100 shows a gain from less than 4,000 in 2009 to 7,600 today.

Some analysts have argued that the IMF and World Bank are over-cooking their analysis after missing the last financial crash – seeing danger around every corner. Others dismiss them as archaic remnants of the postwar consensus that fail to understand how the global economy has entered a new phase, one that keeps stock markets humming along and bad recessions at bay.

In the short term at least, the optimists could be right. And that is largely down to the actions of the US central bank, which was on course to repeat the mistake of 2005-07, when it matched rising debt levels (especially in sub-prime mortgage loans) with rising interest rates, triggering the kind of financial crash that the IMF and World Bank now fear is around the corner. This time, the Federal Reserve retreated after pushing base rates to almost 2.5% – still well short of the pre-crash normality of 4%-5%, but higher than almost everywhere else. After three rate cuts last year, the US economy starts 2020 with the base rate back in a range between 1.5% and 1.75%.

Without higher interest rates, everyone can keep merrily borrowing. And when, for most businesses, borrowing rates remain below their potential income growth rate – even when that is lacklustre – there is not the usual imperative to boost growth through investment in order to afford higher debt repayments.

But really, this is a back-to-front way of discussing the issue. Most of the problems afflicting the global economy relate to a lack of demand for goods and services, at least on average, compared with the years prior to the 2008 crash. And much of the weak demand relates to our ageing populations, which, in the main, focus more on storing up savings for retirement than on spending.

They are also in the habit of voting for governments that promise to keep taxes low and property prices high, allowing them to accumulate even more wealth. Donald Trump and Boris Johnson fit that bill.

Through their pensions and private investments they treat companies like cash machines, demanding a higher dividend every six months. Much of the borrowing by companies has been to pay these dividends, not to invest.

Baby boomers will pretty much all have retired by the end of this new decade, so most will have stopped investing and just be withdrawing investment funds. And it is this turn of the wheel of fortune that will wreck the global economy – if the accumulation of debt and the climate crisis haven’t got there first.


AGelbert

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The Internet is Controlling YOU! (w/ Ramesh Srinivasan)
« Reply #98 on: January 15, 2020, 04:21:09 pm »
The Internet is Controlling YOU! (w/ Ramesh Srinivasan)
1,680 views•Jan 14, 2020


Thom Hartmann Program
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Has anything changed since 2016 ahead of the 2020 election cycle? We use the internet and social media to keep ourselves up with the news and the world.

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If those websites and social media sites promote fake news and lies, how can we trust anything? Algorithms are set to promote political lies with advertising and if you see enough, you will believe them to be the truth.

How is it that corporations like Facebook decide what you and I see and are they trying to control us?

Thom spoke with Ramesh Srinivasan, Professor and Director of UC Digital Cultures Lab – Department of Information Studies and Design.

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Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

 

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