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Author Topic: Defending Wildlife  (Read 897 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #60 on: April 04, 2017, 02:15:10 pm »
 


Just a handful of tiger subspecies remain in the wild — here they are

Elena Motivans March 28, 2017

Tigers are the largest felines in the world. At the start of the 20th century, there were 100,000 tigers in the wild. Now between 3,000 and 4,000 tigers remain due to hunting and habitat loss. Although there is only one species of tiger, Panthera tigris, there are different subspecies, not different enough to be separate species but have subtle differences.

Tigers have only dispersed from Siberia relatively recently, in the past few to 70,000 years. This is enough time for genetic differences to arise but not enough time for them to look really different from each other. Nine subspecies are genetically justified and recognized. Three subspecies are extinct already and the other six subspecies are classified as endangered by the IUCN. In 2015, a controversial study claimed that based on morphology and ecology, there are only two subspecies of tigers. However, this suggestion has not been adopted and the nine subspecies are officially recognized:

Bengal tiger  


Image credits: Mmkhan.mmk.

The Bengal tiger (P.t. tigris) is the most common type of tiger. There are still about 2,500 left in the wild. They live on the Indian subcontinent, in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Bhutan. Bengal tigers are the second largest tiger subspecies and enjoy eating pigs, deer, and other hoofed animals. They live in grasslands, subtropical and tropical rainforests, deciduous forests, and mangroves. Perhaps one reason that they have survived is that they don’t need much space compared to other tigers; about 18 tigers can live in 100 square km (39 square miles).



The Golden Tabby Bengal tiger. Image credits: Dave Pape.

There are 4 different types of Bengals, which interestingly, look even more different from each other than the other subspecies combined. The Standard Bengal is the typical orange and black type, while the other types now only exist in captivity. The Royal White Bengal (white with black stripes) only have 300-400 members left. Thirty Golden Tabby Bengals (red to pale orange cream stripes) are in captivity. The Snow White Bengals (all white or with ghost stripes) are the most threatened type; there are only a dozen left.

Indochinese tiger

Image credits: Accipiter.

The Indochinese tiger (P.t. corbetti) lives in southeast Asia. It used to live in China and Cambodia but is extinct in those regions. In 2010, there were 350 tigers left in the wild. They prefer to live in mountainous or hilly areas. Lots of poaching in the area has really caused the population of Indochinese tiger to drop drastically. Roads, dams, and mines have cut away some of their territories.Their prey has also been wiped out by hunting so it’s hard for the remaining tigers to find food, such as wild pigs and deer.  Luckily, the tropical forests are still intact and they have a place to live.


Malayan Tiger

Image credits: Ted.

The Malayan tiger (P.t. jacksoni) is found only in the Southern part of Malay Peninsula. It used to live in Thailand and Singapore also but is extinct there now. Genetic studies in 2004 named the Malayan tiger a distinct subspecies. Before they were thought to be Indochinese tigers. Morphologically, both species are hard to tell apart. There are fewer than 500 left in the wild, though the number is possibly more between 200 and 300. Their rainforest habitat is disappearing making it hard for them to have the space that they need. Deer and boars aren’t so common, so one tiger lives in 100 square km (39 square miles). The Malaysian government is actively conserving their tiger by introducing wildlife corridors and taking measures to double its population by 2022.

Siberian tiger

Image credits: Appaloosa.

The Siberian tiger (P.t. altaica) is also called the Amur tiger. It lives in Eastern Siberia, with a small population in northeastern China and North Korea. It calls the taiga and eastern Russian birch forest its home. About 500 Siberian tigers exist in the wild. They are adapted to live in the cold Siberian landscape. They are the largest tigers and have thicker fur to survive the cold. The tigers are also paler and have fewer stripes, which are dark brown instead of black. One thing going for them is that they live in the largest unfragmented tiger habitat with the fewest humans. They need the most space of any of the other tiger subspecies, one male needs 1000 square km (386 square miles).

Sumatran tiger

Image credits: Captain Herbert.

The Sumatran tiger (P.t. sumatrae) is found only on Sumatra island. The other two subspecies only found on Indonesian islands have already gone completely extinct. This tiger was found to be a distinct subspecies in 1998 through genetic testing. There are between 400 and 500 left in the wild, mostly in national parks. The Sumatran tiger is the smallest subspecies due to thick forests and small prey. It has dark fur, with closely spaced stripes and a longer mane. One male needs 100 square kilometers (39 square miles) of space.

South China tiger

Image credits: J. Patrick Fischer.

The South China tiger (P.t. amoyensis) is the most endangered subspecies of tiger. It’s also in the top 10 most endangered species in the world. It is officially extinct in the wild, about 65 tigers exist in captivity. There could be a lone few left in the wild; unconfirmed sighting and footprints have been reported. In the 1950s there were supposedly 4,000 South China tigers in the wild. Unfortunately, most of them were killed in the 1950s when the Chinese government labeled them as a pest that should be eradicated. Hunting was banned in 1979, and the government applied some conservation measures in the 1990s, but it was too little too late. That shows you how quickly a species can go extinct if it specifically hunted. The South China tiger is a bright orange colour and has a narrow skull.


Extinct tigers

The extinct Caspian Tiger. Image credits: http://www.petermaas.nl/extinct/animals.htm.

Three tigers were brought to extinction in the past 100 years. The Bali (P. t. balica) and Java tigers (P. t. sondaica) lived on the islands after which they were named. Bali tigers were hunted to extinction in 1937. Javan tigers lost most of their habitat and were killed. The Caspian tiger (P.t. virgate) lived in Eastern Europe and West Asia and went extinct in the early 1970s. It was hunted due to a Soviet Union land reclamation program. Additionally, its prey was hunted and its natural habitat was destroyed. We need to be careful that the living tigers don’t fall to the same fate.

What do you think, should the tigers be considered nine different subspecies or two? If they were considered as two, conservation would be easier, but the unique characteristics of each would be lost.

http://www.zmescience.com/ecology/animals-ecology/different-tigers-world/

Agelbert NOTE: It is sad testament to the success of the empathy deficit disordered fossil fuel industry's mindless, ruinously stupid and irresponsible profit over planet 'business model' that, even while those greedballs are busy destroying the habitat of these majestic animals, the tigers of the world, they can then have the mens rea to associate a tiger with their polluting, biosphere degrading hydrocarbon products (see Esso "put a tiger in your tank" BULLSHIT which morphed into Exxon  ).

Exxon's profit over planet is helping to make us EXTINCT! DON'T LET THEM GET AWAY WITH IT! Bankrupt the fossil fuel fascists with Renewable Energy!

Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #61 on: April 06, 2017, 04:44:59 pm »
The Imperiled American Wolf


Predator Defense

Published on Dec 12, 2012

America's gray wolves were rescued from the brink of extinction over 35 years ago when they gained federal protection under the Endangered Species Act. But these majestic animals have been under attack since April 2011, when President Obama removed them from the endangered species list and turned management over to state wildlife agencies.

By April 2015 over 3,600 wolves had been senselessly slaughtered by sport hunters and trappers in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Minnesota and Wisconsin. This "kill tally" does not include the scores of wolves slaughtered by federal and state predator control programs.

Predator Defense's film, "The Imperiled American Wolf," explains the reasons wolves cannot be successfully managed by state wildlife agencies: not only do their methods ignore the core biology of how wolves hunt and breed, but their funding depends on hunting and trapping fees. In fact, current wolf management may actually lead to wolves' demise. Predator Defense and this film make a bold call for federal relisting of these important apex predators as endangered species.

The war being waged against wolves is senseless and tragic, and it is up to all of us to speak out now on their behalf. Learn more on our website at http://predatordefense.org/wolves.htm.


Agelbert NOTE: As if it wasn't bad enough under Obama, with Trump, it has gotten WORSE for wolves.

Did We Only Bring Wolves Back So We Can Kill Them Again?
http://www.predatordefense.org/wolves.htm
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #62 on: April 06, 2017, 05:02:16 pm »
Coyote Peterson meets a Wolf Pack


Published on Feb 24, 2015


Please SUBSCRIBE NOW! http://bit.ly/BWchannel

On this week's episode Coyote Peterson meets a Wolf Pack!

It goes without saying that Coyote and the crew are extremely thankful to visit some pretty cool locations when making Breaking Trail and as often as they can they try to team up with wildlife preserves or sanctuaries to help support the animals featured on the show. In this particular episode they are taking up residence at Howlers Inn, an Alaskan Tundra Wolf Preserve in Bozeman, Montana.

Five wolves make up the pack and Coyote is hoping to become the sixth member as he has an up-close encounter that is truly a once in a life time experience. If you love wolves this is totally the episode for you!

For more information about these amazing wolves at Howlers, or to schedule a visit of your own please visit www.howlersinn.com


Breaking Trail leaves the map behind and follows adventurer and animal enthusiast Coyote Peterson and his crew as they encounter a variety of wildlife in the most amazing environments throughout North America!

Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #63 on: April 06, 2017, 05:18:50 pm »
Friendly Baby Fox! (in Alaska)


Published on Nov 1, 2016

Please SUBSCRIBE - http://bit.ly/BWchannel
Watch More - http://bit.ly/BTocelot

On this episode of Breaking Trail, Coyote gets up close with an adorable baby Fox!

While visiting Steve Kroschel’s Wildlife Center in Haines, Alaska the Brave Wilderness team were privileged to meet many amazing rescued animals…one of their favorites was Lupin, an orphaned Red Fox.

Lupin was as energized and as playful as they come, and she eagerly entertained the crew for hours with all her pouncing and leaping while running in circles around the cameras!

Get ready to get up close with one friendly baby Fox!


HUGE THANKS to Steve Kroschel and his amazing team for hosting the Brave Wilderness crew and making this video possible. Please visit his website for information on booking a visit to his wildlife center today! - http://bit.ly/stevekroschel


Breaking Trail leaves the map behind and follows adventurer and animal expert Coyote Peterson and his crew as they encounter a variety of wildlife in the most amazing environments on the planet!

The Brave Wilderness Channel is your one stop connection to a wild world of adventure and amazing up close animal encounters!

Follow along with adventurer and animal expert Coyote Peterson and his crew as they lead you on three exciting expedition series - Emmy Award Winning Breaking Trail, Dragon Tails and Coyote’s Backyard - featuring everything from Grizzly Bears and Crocodiles to Rattlesnakes and Tarantulas…each episode offers an opportunity to learn something new.
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

 

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