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Author Topic: Mechanisms of Prejudice: Hidden and Not Hidden  (Read 5961 times)

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AGelbert

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Militarizing US Schools and Society Only Creates More Gun Violence and Police Brutality

July 4, 2018

TRNNís Ben Norton continues his discussion with Boston teacher Nino Brown, of the ANSWER Coalition, on the links between US militarism, gun violence, and police brutality. Nino Brown argues militarizing schools and more heavily arming cops will only make the problem worse


https://therealnews.com/stories/militarizing-us-schools-and-society-only-creates-more-gun-violence-and-police-brutality
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Agelbert NOTE: Scholar Judy Klass tells it like it is. My hat is off to her for this expert accurate analysis of the inexcusable actions by Trump 🦀 and his wrecking crew .

Quote
How do you think history will look at the Trump administration's policy of separating families at the border and putting children in what could be called concentration camps?

Judy Klass  , Truman Scholar, D.Phil Political Science/Latin American Studies, bookish wonk


Answered Jun 26, 2018

Hyperbole is dangerous. Itís true that even Godwin has said that thoughtful, well-informed people might compare Trump Ďs rhetoric with Hitlerís without looking ridiculous via Godwinís Law ó and after all, Trumpís rhetoric since he launched his campaign has been all about scapegoating the Other, and may well be modeled on the rhetoric that brought Hitler to power.

Donald Trump 'kept book of Adolf Hitler's speeches in his bedside cabinet and may have read it for inspiration'

But itís tricky to talk about concentration camps. It bothers me when the internment camps in which Japanese Americans were held during World War II, as awful and unjust and un-American as they were, are called concentration camps ó because for most people, concentration camp = death camp. It means Auschwitz. (Or ďHolocaust Centers,Ē as Sean Spicer might say.) There are rotten, dehumanizing prisons for civilians in many places, but not many where huge numbers of people of all ages are gassed to death, their bodies then burned in crematoria. That was unusual. Iíd only compare a few things to that: the Killing Fields of Pol Pot in Cambodia, what the Serbian Christians did to Bosnian Muslims at Srebenica over the course of a few days in the 1990s ó the ugliest and most genocidal impulses that people have.

The internment camps that Japanese Americans were forced to live in may be a better analogy for the camps that the Trump administration now plans for parents and children who come here seeking asylum. (Those internment camps are the one thing that a lot of people condemn FDR for ó and the only thing about FDR that Trump has talked about admiringly.) And there are crummy facilities for refugees all over the world.

The policy of separating children at the border thatís been in place for months ó thatís kind of its own thing. Abusing refugee children to penalize their parents Ö I hadnít quite heard of that one before. Thatís something kind of distinctive and new that will be remembered about this administration. History will view it as being of a piece with numerous Trump era policies: framing various vulnerable minority groups as the dangerous ďinvading,Ē ďinfestingĒ Other; casually lying as smoothly as Hitler did and with the same gusto; appealing to peopleís lizard brains and basest impulses; incompetent and incoherent policies that do as much harm accidentally as the few well-organized policies do intentionally Ö itís of a piece with allowing 4,600 Americans to die in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria and lying wildly about the numbers. Itís of a piece with mocking a Gold Star family because they are Muslim. Itís as ugly and incoherent and unjustifiable as the travel ban that the Supreme Court has now upheld. And so on.

Sessions and Trump and Nielsen and Huckabee Sanders ó they can prevaricate and say oh, blame Democrats, blame the courts, this has been the policy all along, but itís a policy John Kelly and Stephen Miller and Jefferson Beauregard Sessions came up with and put in place, and Miller and Sessions have acknowledged as much in the past. Under Obama, if a family turned themselves in at the border, the parent would be given a court date for the misdemeanor ó and there was often someone they knew that they all could stay with until then, and most of the time theyíd show up for their hearing, and if they were considered a flight risk, the parent could wear an ankle bracelet. That cost a little money, but not the thousands weíre now paying every day for each parent and child housed separately ó and, soon, possibly housed together, indefinitely. Itís a waste of tax-payer dollars on an unnecessary policy because the system was working before and there were few crimes committed by those released on their own recognizance.

The Trump administration implemented this jarringly cruel policy of separating children from parents with no good system for keeping track of both, no long-term plan for how to reunite them, and now they have no clear plan for the changed policy theyíve announced Ö itís wasteful, mean-spirited incompetence tinged with racism, all the way down the line.

Thatís what history will remember about this policy and about this administration in general: no thought, no care, just the petulant, impulsive wrecking of long-standing policies and treaties that have been painstakingly assembled and were working well, casual violations of human rights, and cruelty for its own sake ó again and again.

https://www.quora.com/How-do-you-think-history-will-look-at-the-Trump-administrations-policy-of-separating-families-at-the-border-and-putting-children-in-what-could-be-called-concentration-camps

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Bodies of 95 black forced-labor prisoners from Jim Crow era unearthed in Sugar Land after one man's quest

By Meagan Flynn / The Washington Post Jul 18, 2018

Today the city of Sugar Land is a sprawling suburb southwest of Houston, home to Imperial Sugar Co., shopping malls and endless cul-de-sacs. ... But, more than a century ago, it was a sprawling network of sugar cane plantations and prison camps. Sugar Land was better known then as the Hellhole on the Brazos. From sun up to sun down, convicts who were leased by the state to plantation owners toiled in the fields chopping sugar cane sometimes until they "dropped dead in their tracks," as the State Convention of Colored Men of Texas complained in 1883.

In modern-day Sugar Land it was all easy to forget - but not for one man named Reggie Moore, who couldn't stop thinking about it. ... Moore started researching Sugar Land's slavery and convict-leasing history after spending time working as a prison guard at one of Texas's oldest prisons, but his curiosity evolved into obsession. He had a hunch. Based on what he learned, he believed that the bodies of former slaves and black prisoners were still buried in Sugar Land's backyard. He focused his attention on a site called the Imperial State Prison Farm, the one that bore the name of the country's premier sugar company.

For 19 years he searched for their bodies, stopping just short of sticking a shovel in the dirt himself. ... "I felt like I had to be a voice for the voiceless," said Moore, who is African American. ... This week, his quest produced results. ... At the former Imperial State Prison Farm site, archaeologists have unearthed an entire plot of precise rectangular graves for 95 souls, each buried 2 to 5 feet beneath the soil in nearly disintegrated pinewood caskets. The 19th century cemetery was unmarked, with no vestige of its existence visible from the surface.

And it was almost "truly lost to history," archaeologist Reign Clark of Goshawk Environmental Consulting told The Washington Post. ... The graves were found, really, by accident. The local Fort Bend Independent School District began construction on a new school at the former prison site in October. Then in February, a backhoe operator happened to see something jutting out of the dirt. He thought it was a human bone.
....

Read more: https://www.richmond.com/news/trending/bodies-of-black-forced-labor-prisoners-from-jim-crow-era/article_d16495ca-db43-550c-918f-0ac9b65fcb30.html


Just about the best book I've read in the last few years was "Slavery by Another Name." It was written by Douglas Blackmon, who at the time was the Atlanta bureau chief of The Wall Street Journal. He is now at the University of Virginia.

-- -- -- --

https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB120674340028272915

BOOKS EXCERPT

A Different Kind of Slavery

After Abolition, Forced Labor Thrived in South; Helping Rebuild Atlanta

By Douglas A. Blackmon

Updated March 29, 2008 12:01 a.m. ET

A Different Kind of Slavery

At the center of a massive new real-estate development in Atlanta, an $18 million monument designed to honor 2,000 years of human achievement is nearing completion. When it opens this summer, a museum inside the Millennium Gate also will pay special tribute to the accomplishments and philanthropy of some of the founding families of modern Atlanta. Organizers say plans for the exhibit don't include one overlooked aspect of two of the city's post-Civil War leaders: the extensive use of thousands of forced black laborers. The builders of the 73-foot archway say the museum is too small to convey every aspect of the city's founders and that it's appropriate to focus on the positive aspects of these men. In this adaptation from his new book, "Slavery by Another Name," Douglas A. Blackmon, Atlanta bureau chief of The Wall Street Journal, chronicles how companies owned by these two men used forced labor to help rebuild Atlanta -- a practice that was widespread through the South.

Millions of bricks used to make the sidewalks and streets of Atlanta's oldest neighborhoods -- many of them still in use today -- came from a factory owned by James W. English, the city's former mayor, and operated almost entirely with black forced laborers. Many had been convicted of frivolous or manufactured crimes and then leased by the city to Mr. English's company, Chattahoochee Brick Co.

Between the Emancipation Proclamation and the beginning of World War II, millions of African-Americans were compelled into or lived under the shadow of the South's new forms of coerced labor. Under laws enacted specifically to intimidate blacks, tens of thousands were arbitrarily detained, hit with high fines and charged with the costs of their arrests. With no means to pay such debts, prisoners were sold into coal mines, lumber camps, brickyards, railroad construction crews and plantations. Others were simply seized by southern landowners and pressed into years of involuntary servitude.

At the turn of the 20th century, at least 3,464 African-American men and 130 women lived in forced labor camps in Georgia, according to a 1905 report by the federal Commissioner of Labor.

-- -- -- --

https://millercenter.org/experts/douglas-blackmon

DOUGLAS BLACKMON
Director of Public Programs, Executive Producer of American Forum

Douglas A. Blackmon is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II , and co-executive producer of the acclaimed PBS documentary of the same name. He is also executive producer and host of American Forum, a public affairs program produced by the University of Virginiaís Miller Center and aired on more than 200 public television affiliates across the U.S.

His book, a searing examination of how the enslavement of African-Americans persisted deep into the 20th Century, was awarded the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction. The Slavery by Another Name documentary was broadcast in February 2012 and attracted an audience of 4.8 million viewers. Slavery by Another Name grew out of his 2001 article on slave labor in The Wall Street Journal. It revealed the use of forced labor by dozens of U.S. corporations and commercial interests in coal mines, timber camps, factories, and farms in cities and states across the South, beginning after the Civil War and continuing until the beginning of World War II.

Blackmon was the longtime chief of The Wall Street Journalís Atlanta bureau and the paperís Senior National Correspondent, and was a contributing editor at the Washington Post. He has written about or directed coverage of some of the most pivotal stories in American life, including the election of President Barack Obama, the rise of the tea party movement, and the BP oil spill. Overseeing coverage of 11 southeastern states for the Journal, he and his team of reporters were responsible for the Journalís acclaimed coverage of Hurricane Katrina and the failed federal response after that disaster; the Journalís investigation into the training and preparations of the 9/11 hijackers in Florida; immigration; poverty; politics; and daily reporting on more than 2,500 corporations based in the region.

As a writer and editor at large, Blackmon led the Journalís coverage of the tea party and the final hours before the BP oil spillófor which he and a team of other Journal writers were finalists for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting. Those stories received a Gerald Loeb Award in June 2011.

https://www.democraticunderground.com/10142112480
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AGelbert

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Re: Mechanisms of Prejudice: Hidden and Not Hidden
« Reply #304 on: September 09, 2018, 11:33:14 am »
Brett Kavanaugh is a Threat to Racial Justice and Voting Rights

BY Marjorie Cohn Truthout

PUBLISHED September 8, 2018

SNIPPET:

Quote
Hirono quoted an email in which Kavanaugh wrote, ďI think the testimony needs to make clear that any program targeting Native Hawaiians as a group is subject to strict scrutiny and of questionable validity under the Constitution.Ē

That email was one of tens of thousands of documents the GOP-led Senate Judiciary Committee had marked ďcommittee confidentialĒ in an unprecedented attempt to hide them from the public. By releasing that email, Hirono risked censure, discipline or removal from the Senate.

Hirono, who said Kavanaughís views on Native Hawaiians are ďfactually wrongĒ and incredibly offensive, told the nominee:

full article:

https://truthout.org/articles/brett-kavanaugh-is-a-threat-to-racial-justice-and-voting-rights/
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Re: Mechanisms of Prejudice: Hidden and Not Hidden
« Reply #305 on: September 25, 2018, 06:13:48 pm »
Debate Recap: 2018 Maryland Governorís Race

September 25, 2018

Incumbent Republican Larry Hogan 😈 and Sanders-backed Democrat Ben Jealous ✨square off in the only debate in the race for Maryland Governor


https://therealnews.com/stories/debate-recap-2018-maryland-governors-race
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Re: Mechanisms of Prejudice: Hidden and Not Hidden
« Reply #306 on: September 27, 2018, 10:48:03 pm »
Blasey Ford/Kavanaugh Testimony Exposes Deep Misogyny and Political Divides

September 27, 2018

An emotional day of testimony by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh displayed our political partisanship while exposing the raw nerve of sexual assault



https://therealnews.com/stories/blasey-ford-kavanaugh-testimony-exposes-deep-misogyny-and-political-divides
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Re: Mechanisms of Prejudice: Hidden and Not Hidden
« Reply #307 on: September 29, 2018, 07:16:56 pm »
Quote
🦍 👹 😈 Does anyone actually believe the allegations against Kavanaugh? Isn't it a little fishy that all of a sudden every Republican politician is under fire for things that no one can prove?

MG Berge 👍👍👍, Consultant

Answered Friday, September 28, 2018
 
Yesterday was a watershed moment for me as a Fat old privileged white man. My suggestion is that you listen carefully and digest before reveling in your partisan thoughts.

First off, I do believe the allegations against Kavanaugh, in part due to Fordís testimony, in part due to his, but even more so due to my personal realizations. His anger and tears were the emotions of a man caught in a lie. Have patience with me as I tell you a relevant story. It was just over 18 years ago that I met my lovely wife. During our short courtship period, she revealed her traumatic story to me. As a single young mother, several years before we met, she was assaulted in much the same manner as Ford claims. Having just started a new job one month prior, she was encouraged to attend a dinner with a good many co-workers as well as very senior executives in the conference room at a local hotel/convention center. People were laughing and showing off pictures of their families. It seemed to be a good team building moment. At the end of the two-hour event, she has a foggy recollection of being carried upstairs by two of the senior execs, unable to move. Now if you assume she had consumed too much, you would be wrong as she was a competitive bodybuilder/fitness athlete. She did not drink and was obsessive about her diet. Something was put into her water.

Those two senior execs, that had spent a great deal of time showing her pictures of their families and winning her trust, R A P E D HER. She recalls it very clearly. Having two kids to feed, she was worried about her job and struggled to go to work the next day, but she went. Noticing she was distraught, two female co-workers asked and she relayed the incident, whereby she was encouraged to go to the hospital. She did so only after finishing the day's work as she was afraid of losing her job. The police came, she was photographed (there were many marks) and in the end, she did not press charges. WHY? Again, she was afraid of losing her job and she knew that she would be condemned, not the senior execs. There were kids to feed.

I was certainly compassionate when I heard the story, but it just did not really register on me. Then we have yesterday. I had the TV on to the news (mostly for noise) while I worked in my home office. I had not one inkling that this hearing should have an effect on my wife. Oh, but did it have an effect. Ms. Fordís testimony had my wife transfixed, it brought everything back for her as if the event in question was yesterday. How in the sam hell could I be so blind, so inconsiderate and stupid?

The answer to the how is that I am one of the guilty, that being a privileged old white man. No, I have never assaulted or raped anyone, far from it, but I certainly have been callous to women's rights. I laughed at the life-sized Wile E Coyote doll in the trophy case of the team house. One arm cut off and a name tape across the chest and a spare silly looking hat on its head. It was a trophy that some worked hard to win, though I will let you all imagine how. I have told jokes at women's expense and unconsciously looked at women in the workplace as playing only a supporting role. I have bought into the sexual objectification of women as promoted by TV/print advertising as well as Hollywood and the conservative culture I grew up in. I was taught that us men were proper and conservative when in reality we were selfish p r i c k s.

Last night I realized my gross stupidity but it took the suffering of my wife watching this entire sordid affair to do so. I feel horrible.

The whole confirmation/Republican/Democrat thing is nothing but bullshit. I was sickened by both Republicans and Democrats yesterday as both used Dr. Ford as nothing but an expendable tool in order to get their way. I often think we have fallen so far, but then again, maybe we have never climbed out of the stinking hole filled with s h i t that we have always been in.

My concept is ďwhen in doubt, throw it outĒ. 👍 This is a job interview and the Judge is owed nothing. The response should be ďThank you Mr. Kavanaugh, you are impressive but we need to look elsewhereĒ. There is no shortage of candidates that have no baggage. I am happy that all of this is coming out, painful though it may be. Change is needed and the privileged white guy needs to be taken down a notch or 50.

It is time we start acting like dignified people pulling in a unified direction. This selfishness and tribal mentality will quickly destroy a great nation. We can be better than this!!!!!!!

Edit:

While I am trying to keep up with comments and clarify where I can, it is getting a bit out of my hands, so I thought I would add a couple points here. In regards to women's, rights, I am heartened to see the groundswell of activity and attitude that has occurred over the last several years. Writing the words ďwomen's rightsĒ seems odd to me as those rights should be expected, taken for granted. But they have not been and we are now seeing the results. I say it is about time.

As to Judge Kavanaugh, I have said enough about him already. There are enough words floating around out there professing his guilt or innocence, how this is right or wrong so that I do not need to add any more insight. What I see this being about is full disclosure. Not by Kavanaugh but by all women. There has been so much abuse specifically because us men have not been held accountable. Understandably. most women HAVE BEEN afraid to come forward after an assault.

Even today, my wife does not want anyone to know about her assault. In fact, I am feeling bad about this written story right now and it may have to come down. She is afraid of how it could affect her in the workplace, how it could affect the opinions of friends and family. Embarrassed, ashamed, scared or maybe just fearful of having to continually face the memories are all reasons for staying silent. Then we have the knowledge that for so long, the victim will be held to blame and the assaulter will face no repercussions.

Us men have gotten away with our poor behavior for so long, comfortable in the knowledge that no one will say anything, and if they do we can just deny it. This confirmation process is stoking the fires of anger in many, many women. They are sharing their story, opening the floodgates. Doing this by many will change the calculation. When aggressors realize it will be much harder to get away with poor behavior, there will be less poor behavior to try and get away with.

To be sure, there will be collateral damage, impacts to undeserving men, it is inevitable. Maybe that collateral damage will be to Kavanaugh, maybe to me. If so, that's fine as everything good in life comes at a cost.

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As Far Right 🦍👹 Marches in London, UK Teachers Organize Against Racism

October 15, 2018

Educators gathered in Leeds to share strategies on how to combat growing racism, xenophobia and and Islamophobia across the UK


https://therealnews.com/stories/as-far-right-marches-in-london-uk-teachers-organize-against-racism
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After White Supremacist Terror, Trump Doubles Down from Birthright to the Border

October 30, 2018

In the aftermath of a spate of white supremacist violence from Florida to Kentucky to Pittsburgh, President Trump is ramping up nativism and xenophobia. The U.S. is deploying up to 14,000 troops to the U.S.-Mexico border, purportedly in response to a caravan of Central American asylum seekers. Trump also says he might revoke birthright citizenship for the babies of non-citizens. We are joined by historian Gerald Horne of the University of Houston


Story Transcript

AARON MATE: Itís The Real News. Iím Aaron Mate.

From pipe bombs in the mail, to the killing of two black shoppers in Kentucky, to the synagogue massacre in Pittsburgh, the U.S. is grappling with yet a new round of white supremacist terror. But in the aftermath of this incident, and just days before the midterms, President Trump is ramping up the nativism and xenophobia that has stoked white supremacists. First, on Monday, federal officials announced plans to send 5,200 active duty troops to the U.S.-Mexico border in response to a caravan of Central American asylum seekers fleeing violence in dire conditions at home.

SPEAKER: Our message to the organizers and participants of this caravan is simple: As the President and Secretary Nielsen have made clear, we will not allow a large group to enter the United States in an unsafe and unlawful manner. For those that seek to cross the border illegally. We will apprehend them and fully enforce the laws of the United States. For those that seek to make an asylum claim safely and lawfully in a port of entry, the governor of Mexico has already offered you protection and employment authorization. If you are fleeing alleged persecution at home, you have arrived at a safe place to make your claim.

AARON MATE: According to Newsweek, the size of the U.S. force on the border could top 14,000. This comes amid reports that Trump is mulling executive actions to shut down border entry entirely, and even suspend habeas corpus, which grants detainees the right to appear before a judge.

Then on Tuesday, Trump announced yet another potential executive action. Speaking to AXIOS, Trump said he might revoke birthright citizenship for babies of noncitizens and undocumented immigrants.

DONALD TRUMP: Now theyíre saying I can do it just with an executive order. Now, how ridiculous- weíre the only country in the world where a person comes in, has a baby, and the baby is essentially a citizen of the United States for 85 years with all of those benefits. Itís ridiculous. Itís ridiculous. And it has to end.

REPORTER: Have you talked about that with counsel?

DONALD TRUMP: Yeah, I have.

REPORTER: So where in the process is-

DONALD TRUMP: Itís in the process. Itíll happen. With an executive order. Thatís what youíre talking about, right?

Yeah, thatís exactly what I was talking about.

Thatís very interesting. I didnít think anybody knew that but me. I thought I was the only one.

AARON MATE: Joining me to discuss Trumpís latest anti-immigrant actions is Gerald Horne, historian and professor of history and African-American studies at the University of Houston. Welcome, Dr. Horne. Let me ask you first about this latest announcement from Trump today about birthright citizenship. Do you think that he even has the constitutional authority to end birthright citizenship for noncitizens? And if he doesnít, then as a historian, what do you make of what heís doing here?

GERALD HORNE: Apparently he does not have the authority to end birthright citizenship via an executive order. That is the impression I got from the words not only of Speaker Paul Ryan, but also from a survey of a number of leading constitutional scholars.

Having said that, we all know that the Republicans have packed the courts, the federal courts, in recent months and years. And many of these federal judges owe a debt of gratitude to the Republicans and Mr. Trump personally for him placing them on the court. And so itís possible that there could be a wildcard federal judge, and certainly a wildcard Supreme Court, that could pass on that. I doubt it. But weíre in a different age right now. Itís obvious that many of our liberal friends have miscalculated when they overestimated the democratic potential nature of the United States of America, and the Bill of Rights, particularly. And Iím afraid to say that many of us are going to pay the price for that miscalculation.

AARON MATE: As a historian, when you hear Trump speak like this, what historical parallels come up for you? Iíll just say for myself that my thought today was I was recalling how the Nazis, back when they were formulating their own so-called racial purification laws, that they looked to the United States for inspiration.

GERALD HORNE: Thatís true. Thereís been a good deal of scholarship with regard to that, particularly how the Nazis looked the United States for so-called antimiscegenation laws. That is to say, laws in the United States that basically made it verboten for those defined as white to marry those defined as black. Obviously in Germany that was transferred to the German non-Jewish population and the Jewish population.

That is one striking parallel, but of course there are striking parallels from U.S. history itself. We should not forget the fact that when the Ku Klux Klan arose post-1865 in the wake of the U.S. Civil War, in many ways they were the armed wing of the Democratic Party. That is to say, the Democratic Party then being the party of Jim Crow, the party of Dixie. And that kind of terrorism that was inflicted, not least on black people post-1865, we hear echoes at least of that kind of policy in 2018 as enunciated by the present occupant of the White House.

AARON MATE: OK. So you mentioned 1865. So just 13 years later, in 1878, you have the signing of the Posse Comitatus Act, which bars military forces from playing a role in domestic law enforcement. Now there is talk of that being suspended, along with the suspension of habeas corpus, as I mentioned earlier, giving people the right to appear before a judge in this crackdown on the border, with Trump sending thousands of troops there, possibly over 14,000, which is about as many as are in Afghanistan right now.

And yesterday at the White House, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders was asked about this, and whether these drastic steps, these suspensions of constitutional protections, is on the table.

REPORTER: Now those are options on the table?

SARAH HUCKABEE SANDERS: Look, Iím not going to get into specific policies that weíre considering. Thereís a number of actions that weíre looking at taking. When weíre ready to make an announcement on that front, weíll let you know.

AARON MATE: Thatís Sarah Huckabee Sanders. So Dr. Horne, if Trump is sending thousands of troops to the border, is he violating Posse Comitatus? And would there be a historical parallel for such an infringement, as heís apparently doing that?

GERALD HORNE: Well, once again Iíd have to give a similar response as I gave to the previous question; that is to say, that there is an argument that he is in violation of the law, but there is a counter argument that if he goes before the so-called right judge, that will not matter. It reminds me of what Trumpís lawyer Roy Cohn, the late Roy Cohn, the anticommunist fixer and colleague of Senator Joe McCarthy, once said. When he went into court he didnít want to know what the law is, he wanted to know who the judge is. And I think that thatís the kind of philosophy that you see taking place with regard to Mr. Trumpís actions.

Secondly, this removal or threat to remove habeas corpus is particularly dangerous. That is a long-standing writ that goes back to England hundreds of years ago which allows a prisoner improperly detained to go before a judge and be released. That suggests that there will be a mass roundup of some sort where people will not be able to go to a federal judge to be released.

And then thirdly, I think you have to look at the fact or the possibility that what Mr. Trump is saying is a desperate electoral gambit. That is to say, the midterm elections are taking place on Tuesday. There are polls that suggest that the Republicans will lose the House. More to the point, the Houston papers in particular are talking about a Beto bump; that is to say, senatorial candidate Beto OíRourke, whoís running against incumbent Ted Cruz. Heís behind in the polls. But the so-called Beto bump might wipe out Republican Congressman Will Hurd, a former CIA analyst who is now in the Congress. Heís running against a very strong Democratic candidate who is expected to benefit from the Beto bump. And itís possible that Mr. Trump is trying to prevent other Beto bumps by ginning up the right-wing base, particularly in southern Texas.

AARON MATE: So in terms of these threats to all these basic rights, now, there is a growing fear that this is not just being done to target undocumented people, but this is also part of a process that wants to gin up fear in order to justify cracking down on dissent on progressives at home, working people, to crush strikes. And Iím wondering, in this context, to what extent is the historical crackdown on working people, the crushing of unions- a huge theme especially in the 20th century- how has that contributed to what weíre seeing today, and actually to the appeal and the power of white supremacy across the country?

GERALD HORNE: Well, I couldnít have asked a better question myself. One of the things Iíve been stressing in recent days, months, and indeed, years, is that you cannot underestimate the potency of the Red Scare, which not least routed progressive labor. I oftentimes cite the case of Harry Bridges, the leader of West Coast Longshore, who led the San Francisco General Strike of 1934. Happened to be born in Melbourne, Australia. And therefore it led to repeated efforts not only to deport him, but to weaken his progressive leadership. The Union, the International Longshore and Warehousemanís Union, had to spent a pretty penny out of its treasury in order to keep their leader from being deported. I could also cite the case of Ferdinand Smith, a black Jamaican who was number two in the National Maritime Union, who actually was deported in the early 1950s, which led to the demolishing, virtually, of the National Maritime Union, which he led, turning ships into floating slums.

That also led to a devastation of political education which has been particularly harmful to the working class. Particularly, I would say, those working-class voters who were seduced and [traduced] into voting for Mr. Trump in places like Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, et cetera. And it created an overall atmosphere of backwardness whereby the class question was downgraded, which inevitably lead like a seesaw to the rising of ultra right-wing white nationalism, which you just saw manifested in Pittsburgh, not least.

AARON MATE: I want to go to a clip of some of the xenophobia and chauvinism that has stoked by the media. Because itís not just Trump, itís also his allies on Fox News, especially. So I want to go to Lou Dobbs speaking recently on his show on the Fox Business Network.

LOU DOBBS: The fear is, to be clear, the fear is that some of them are radical Islamist terrorists that have intermingled with this group of Central Americans. A further fear is that many of the, you know, so many of these, these migrants from Central America, frankly, are radical left-wingers. Their leaders are left-wing party members, for crying out loud, out of Honduras. This is- and no one other than the President at this point, we- you know, I keep expecting to hear Chuck Schumer Nancy Pelosi express their concern for America. But with a caravan that seems to be doubling every few days in size, they have said nothing.

AARON MATE: So thatís Lou Dobbs speaking on the Fox Business Channel about the migrant caravan comprised of hundreds of people fleeing violence and persecution in Central America. Dr. Horne, As we wrap, where do you rate this moment right now in history, in terms of the level of white supremacy and chauvinism weíre seeing being mainstreamed across the country? And if you have any comments on what Lou Dobbs said there, and especially about the role that thatís stoking fear of immigrants has played in a historical context.

GERALD HORNE: Well, obviously Lou Dobbs is introducing a canard when heís speaking about so-called Middle Easterners who are part of this caravan of hope, which is making its way through Mexico as we speak. I find it also striking that the speaker in waiting, Kevin McCarthy, has demonized Jewish billionaires such as George Soros, Michael Bloomberg, Tom Steyer, whoís leading the struggle to impeach Mr. Trump; and deleted his tweet demonizing them, but the stain still remains. Note as well that the New York Times just reported this morning that a leading executive of Campbellís Soup Company was recently ousted because he singled out George Soros as financing this caravan thatís heading North. That is to say, like Kevin McCarthy, helping to whip up the kind of anti-Semitism that you saw recently manifested in Pittsburgh.

I would say this is a particularly dangerous moment, because unlike previous dangerous moments we donít have the necessary kind of international solidarity that the black liberation movement, for example, enjoyed for decades, but does not necessarily enjoy today. That means that the ultra right-wing white nationalists have wind in their sails as a result, and our climb as a result will be uphill, Iím afraid.


AARON MATE: Weíll leave it there. Gerald Horne, historian, professor of history and African-American studies at the University of Houston, thanks very much.

GERALD HORNE: Thank you.

AARON MATE: And thank you for joining us on The Real News.

https://therealnews.com/stories/after-white-supremacist-terror-trump-doubles-down-from-birthright-to-the-border
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AGelbert

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Re: Mechanisms of Prejudice: Hidden and Not Hidden
« Reply #310 on: November 13, 2018, 09:38:38 pm »
Vote Recount in Georgia and Florida Defined by Racism and Voter Suppression

November 13, 2018

A new political movement is born in the South in the wake of Trump and Republicansí efforts to stop vote recounts. Democracy is on trial


Story Transcript

MARC STEINER: Welcome to The Real News Network. Iím Marc Steiner.

This election is not really over, especially in places like Georgia and Florida. And given the history of this nation thatís not surprising Georgia House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams, the Democratic candidate for governor, is facing off with Republican Brian Kemp, who is- or was, until the other day- Secretary of State in the state of Georgia. Part of the responsibility of that office is to oversee voter registration and elections. Kemp, whose ads while running against Abrams show him wielding a shotgun next to his pickup truck, has a political history, penchant, and strategy of voter suppression. He purged more than 1.5 million- thatís 10.6 percent of all registered voters- between 2016 and 2018. He carries on the grand old tradition in Georgia that dates back from the end of the Civil War to ensure that black people do not get to vote. As an example, Kemp put on hold the voter registration of 53,000 people, 70 percent of them African Americans.

The race between Abrams and Kemp is razor thin. If he falls below 50.1 percent of the vote, there has to be a special election. Kemp declared victory and is trying to get Abrams to concede, saying thereís a liberal conspiracy to deny him victory. And in Florida, the home of the hanging chad, made famous in the 2000 Gore v. Bush battle for the U.S. presidency, a recount has been ordered in both the race for the United States Senate between Governor Rick Scott and sitting Senator Bill Nelson, and in the race for governor between Congressman Ron DeSantis and Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum. The courts ordered the recount of eight million ballots by this Thursday. The larger metropolitan areas and communities like Broward County say they cannot possibly make that deadline of Thursday for the recount. Itís impossible; too many people. However, if they donít, then all those votes- the majority of which might go to Andrew Gillum- for one, may not be counted at all.

And to top it all off, Trump has weighed in, saying and tweeting, quote, the Florida election should be called in favor of Rick Scott and Ron DeSantis, because large numbers of new ballots showed up out of nowhere- which, by the way, is a bald-faced lie. And then went on to tweet and say many ballots are missing or forged; another lie. And it goes on to say, tweet, an honest vote count is no longer possible. Ballots massively infected; must go on with election night results.

So the battle is on between the legacy of the Confederacy, slavery, and violence, and the forces of a new progressive South which could possibly be on the verge of electing the first black governors since Reconstruction, and the first black woman governor in the history of this country; and all this is coming now as no surprise.

Gerald Horne holds the John J. and Rebecca Moores Chair of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston; a frequent guest and contributor here on The Real News. And Gerald, welcome. Good to have you with us.

GERALD HORNE: Thank you for inviting me.

MARC STEINER: So, Gerald, letís just take this from the top, here. The state of Georgia and Florida, and these recounts that are taking place at the moment. Now, what weíre seeing here- I want to start with this. I mean, how deeply do we understand how voter suppression, especially in Georgia, may have played in whatís going on between Kemp and Abrams at this moment?

GERALD HORNE: Well, the Abrams camp- quite correctly, in my opinion- has charged that Brian Kemp, who up until a few days ago was secretary of state of Georgia, and thereby, therefore helping to supervise and administer these elections, was involved in a rather crass and blatant attempt to purge from the voter roles particularly those who were considered to be African American, which would thereby tip the scales in his favor.

As we speak, the struggle consists of this: Stacey Abrams is trying to make sure that if Brian Kemp wins, he wins 50 percent-plus, as opposed to, as it now stands, where he may be below 50 percent. And if that is the case, that he is below 50 percent, that means that there should be a runoff. That is what is at stake as we speak.

Florida is a different kettle of fish. As of now, Rick Scott, the governor, and who you could see as being the agent in charge of these elections as governor, is now in a battle for the U.S. Senate with the 75-year old incumbent Bill Nelson. He has a 0.15 margin of victory as we speak, which automatically means that there will be a recount of some sort. It is apparent, as a judge has suggested, that the Republicans are trying to intimidate the recount process, going after local officials, particularly in Broward County. This campaign has been joined by Senator Marco Rubio, and also by the 45th president of the United States of America, who as you know has a second home in Florida, is very close to the man who is running for governor, and also has a slight lead, that is subject to a runoff- Iím speaking of Ron DeSantis. And according to press reports, Mr. Trump will consider it to be a personal affront and a personal rebuke if Ron DeSantis, in particular, is not dragged across the finish line.

MARC STEINER: Iím going to go- think of the race had happened 2000, when Al Gore, for most peopleís consideration, won that race in Florida, but clearly didnít fight it in the Supreme Court. If, for argumentís sake, Abrams and Gillum lose-and Nelson- lose in these recounts, and they take it to the courts, we have a very different situation in the courts than we did in 2000 in 2018. The courts have shifted right in America. The Supreme Court has shifted right and very conservative in America. If it goes that far, I mean, Iím wondering what you think politically it could set up.

GERALD HORNE: Well, you are correct to suggest that Mr. Trump has appointed a number of Supreme Court justices; Mr. Kavanaugh most recently. Heís appointed a record number of federal district court judges and federal appellate judges. That is true. However, I do feel that Ms. Abrams has attained some victories in the courts, and we should not rule out the possibility that she can attain further victories.

I agree with your supposition that Al Gore did the Democratic party no favors when he failed to challenge aggressively the recount in Florida in the year 2000 that led to George W. Bush being president. And I would say the same thing for John Kerry in 2004, where he could have challenged the result aggressively in the state of Ohio. We are now paying a very stiff penalty and price for their lack of aggressiveness.

MARC STEINER: To Florida for a moment, as we work our back up to Georgia. One of the things that I have been reading this morning in the papers is that Broward County, other counties that probably would lean for Gillum and lean for Nelson, most likely, are saying we need more time. We have too many voters here. We have too many ballots to count. It cannot be done by Thursday. So itís clear that theyíre being set up for failure, it seems to me, and being set up to ensure a Republican win.

GERALD HORNE: I do not disagree with what you say. Not only that, but consider what happened on election day approximately a week ago. If you went to voting precincts and voting sites in the center of Georgia, for example the area around Morehouse College, Spelman College, the historically black campuses, you would have found long lines, you would have found voting machines that did not work precisely, not to mention not perfectly. However, if you had gone to some of the more conservative areas in the state of Georgia, such as Macon, or heading southward towards the Florida state line, you would not have encountered such a problem. Obviously that tips the scales in favor of the Republicans, just like the fact that the courts have been impacted by Mr. Trump also tips the scales in favor of Republicans.

MARC STEINER: Now, this race is very tight, and Kemp has been- Brian Kemp has been after Abrams and her work since the beginning with the new Georgia Voters Project that he took to court, tried to stop them from registering voters. He has banned people, one estimate is 1.5 million voters over a four year period; 35,000 more before this election started. And so Iím curious, I mean, this is- you know, Georgia has a history here. Georgia has a history of voter suppression, from the end of the Confederacy on. And it just seems to rear its head in whatever fashion or form it takes given the historical moment. So the battle in Georgia, to me, is indicative of a much larger battle that weíre facing. But it really is very intense in Georgia.

GERALD HORNE: I think youíre on to something. Thereís a battle for small Ďdí democracy. The battle was tipped in the favor of the right wing when a few years ago the U.S. Supreme Court, led by Supreme Court Justice John Roberts, the chief justice, ripped the heart out of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Fundamentally, as per the Voting Rights Act of 1965, until the Shelby decision that the Roberts Court helped to ram through, if a state like Georgia, which had a long-demonstrated record of racism and white supremacy in terms of keeping people away from the polls, if they made changes in terms of how many voting machines would be cited in a particular precinct, this had to be pre-cleared, so to speak, by the U.S. Justice Department. After the Roberts-engineered decision, preclearance went out of the window. And in its wake you saw a number of states move to have voter ID laws. For example, in the state of Texas, from where Iím speaking now, the legislature tried to have a voter ID law where a college ID was deemed not to be acceptable as a voter ID, but a hunting license was deemed to be acceptable, with the premise being that students might be prone to vote for the opponents of the Republicans, and hunters might be prone to vote for the Republicans.

This is the dire state of affairs that weíre encountering, not only in the state of Georgia, but Iím afraid to say all across Dixie.

GERALD HORNE: [Inaudible] said in the Atlantic, if the Georgia race had taken place in another country, say the Republic of Georgia, U.S. media and the U.S. State Department would not have hesitated to question its legitimacy. I mean, and even Jimmy Carter has said similar things, having monitored elections across the globe.

So no matter who ends up winning this in these cases right now in Georgia or Florida, letís take Georgia again, what does it set up politically if Abrams wins? But what does it set up politically if Abrams is denied the win because of voter suppression? Because it interrupts a whole new political struggle that is also based on the reality that this Georgia race is so close. I mean, weíre talking about Georgia, where a black woman could win- can almost win, or win the governorship. So Iím curious what you think this sets up politically in terms of the struggle in this country.

GERALD HORNE: Well, an Abrams victory would be highly significant. I would even go so far as to say that the Abrams race to this point has been very significant. Recall that in recent elections in the state of Georgia the Democrats have sought to appeal to the mythical suburban swing voters. They have tipped to the right. They ran a relative of President Jimmy Carter; they ran a relative of former conservative Democratic hawk Senator Sam Nunn of Georgia. Both lost spectacularly.

And now you have Stacey Abrams, along with Andrew Gillum in Florida, who are running as true blue progressives. Andrew Gillum has even gone so far as to come out for Medicare for All. He campaigned alongside Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who endorsed him. So they basically helped to blazed a new trail for the Democratic Party in Dixie. So win or lose, it seems to me that the Democrats now have a recipe and a prescription for getting closer to the finish line than they have gotten to this point. Let us hope that they follow the logic of what Iím saying.

MARC STEINER: If you look at the history of this country and the power that the South has played politically in this country from the very founding of this nation, from three fifths of a vote so they can count the people who they had enslaved to ensure that they had political power, to what happened in the civil rights movement of the í60s, to what this struggle is about now and the form itís taking at this moment in the South, the fact that you have this progressive mass of people who are who are at least half the population in both states, if not a majority, this is a really different political dynamic for the future. Itís built also around the black struggle in the south via a Gillum and Abrams personifying it in their races. So I just want to take a step further, what this might say for the inside of the Democratic Party, what this says for the continuing struggle in America, for a progressive America, in the face of this kind of real right-wing nationalist pushback embodied in Trump, but actually started much earlier.

GERALD HORNE: Well there is also a message for the GOP, for the Republican Party. Iím not saying that demographics is destiny, but itís apparent that the Trump recipe of ginning up a white right base, which he did successfully in November 2016, is basically reaching a point of expiration. That is one of the major messages that one can glean not only from the Abrams and Gillum races, but I would say from the results last Tuesday more generally.

I think that thereís a lesson for the progressive movement, as well. That is to say, that oftentimes our friends in the progressive movement have a rather dewy-eyed, overly idealized analysis of the history of this country. They tend to point to the Bill of Rights as being this great leap forward for humanity. Whereas if you look at the Bill of Rights with more careful scrutiny, youíll find that it was devised without the black population in mind, or it was devised to target the black population, and I would also say the Native American population. That is the import of the ballyhooed Second Amendment, which basically authorized the use of militias to suppress revolts of the enslaved, and uprising by the indigenous population. Therefore I think that the races that weíre talking about in Florida and Texas not only have significance in import for the GOP and for the Democratic Party; it has significance and import as well. For those to the left of the Democratic Party.

MARC STEINER: So I donít know whether you are or not; my guess is you may not be a betting man. But Iím curious what you think the outcome might be of all this in the next week.

GERALD HORNE: Well, itís hard to say. If you look closely at the numbers, I think that there is a distinct possibility that a recount a count of absentee ballots and provisional ballots, can drive Brian Kempís numbers below 50 percent, causing a runoff which would then allow Stacey Abrams to do a major mobilization and win the gubernatorial race in the state of Georgia. Things in Florida seemingly are different, but Iím rather reluctant to make a prediction and stare into my crystal ball, because we all know about the hanky panky and shenanigans that the Republicans are notorious for in the state of Florida, and they can upset and destabilize the most accurate of prognosticators.

MARC STEINER: It is always a pleasure to have you with us here on The Real News. I really enjoy your thoughts and hearing what you had to say about all this. I appreciate your time.

GERALD HORNE: Thank you.

MARC STEINER: And Iím Marc Steiner here for The Real News Network. Clearly weíre going to stay on top of this one. Take care.

https://therealnews.com/stories/vote-recount-in-georgia-and-florida-defined-by-racism-and-voter-suppression
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

 

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