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Author Topic: Defending Wildlife  (Read 1810 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #75 on: February 15, 2018, 01:59:32 pm »
 

This yearling ringed seal was rescued off Unalaska in 2017 and treated at Alaska SeaLife Center. (Alaska SeaLife Center)

Win:🌟 Protection Upheld for Arctic's Ringed Seals 

We celebrated this week when the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Endangered Species Act protection for ringed seals, Arctic ice seals threatened by climate change. The ruling reverses a 2016 lower-court decision that rejected protection for the seals, which give birth in snow caves built on top of sea ice. Global warming is causing caves to collapse and leaving pups vulnerable to death by freezing or predation.

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to protect these seals in 2008. Four years later they were put on the endangered species list — but the oil industry and the state of Alaska challenged that decision.

"The decision underscores the recklessness of the Trump 🦀 administration's proposal to open up the Arctic Ocean to oil drilling ," said the Center's Kristen Monsell. "Ringed seals have a shot at survival thanks to the Endangered Species Act, but only if we rapidly reduce the greenhouse pollution destroying their habitat."

Read more in Anchorage Daily News.

https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/environment/2018/02/12/court-approves-threatened-species-status-for-ringed-seals-in-alaska/

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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #76 on: March 11, 2018, 04:28:03 pm »
Something Mysterious Is Killing Captive Gorillas  :(

Just before 8 o’clock on a snowy Wednesday morning, deep in a maze of doors and steel fencing in the basement of the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, a 30-year-old gorilla named Mokolo is getting a heart ex…
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #77 on: March 11, 2018, 04:39:36 pm »


The Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced last week that it will now consider all permits for importing elephant trophies from African nations on a “case-by-case basis," breaking from President T…
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #78 on: March 30, 2018, 02:29:24 pm »
Victory! Turtles Return to Beach That Used to Be Covered in Plastic Trash After Massive Clean Up Effort

Aleksandra Pajda

March 30, 2018 



http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/turtles-return-beach-covered-plastic-trash/
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #79 on: April 03, 2018, 05:52:56 pm »
WildEarth GUARDIANS

VICTORY

Ensuring Lobos Will Roam their Southwestern Homelands

April 2, 2018

Celebrating a Win for Wolves

Last week we celebrated the 20th anniversary of the return of Mexican wolves to the wilds of Arizona and New Mexico. This week we celebrate the most significant legal victory for lobos in years. We couldn’t have done it without you.

In 2013, the federal government began a process to change how wolves, including Mexican wolves, were managed. We called on you to speak out against weakening protections and you answered: you signed petitions, sent comments, came to rallies and testified at hearings. Together, we laid the groundwork for a lawsuit challenging the government’s flawed plan that capped the Mexican wolf population at less than half what leading scientists say is necessary for recovery, limited where Mexican wolves can roam, liberalized trapping and killing wolves at the behest of the livestock industry and labeled the wolves “non-essential” to the species’ survival in the wild, a designation that allows weak protections.

Yesterday a federal judge agreed with us  and criticized the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for ignoring scientists who sounded the alarm. Now the Service must create management guidelines that do not merely keep lobos hovering on the brink, but will truly recover this critically imperiled species. At just 114 wolves in the wild, the need is urgent.

Today we celebrate. Tomorrow we go back to work.   

http://www.wildearthguardians.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=13424&news_iv_ctrl=1681#.WsP0LIjwY2y
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #80 on: April 13, 2018, 04:33:45 pm »
One Green Planet 🍃

April 13, 2018

Investigation Reveals California Fisheries Are Responsible for Killing Hundreds of Dolphins, Turtles, and Whales 😱

By Aleksandra Pajda

SNIPPET:

An undercover investigation carried out off the coast of California by animal rights and marine conservation groups Mercy for Animals, Turtle Island Restoration Network, SeaLegacy, and Sharkwater has discovered the shocking hidden effects of the driftnet fishing industry. It was found that besides the targeted swordfish, marine mammals like dolphins, sea lions, sea turtles, sharks, and even seabirds are dying in these massive nets that are essentially walls of floating netting. Some of these species are even considered threatened or endangered. In 2017, two endangered sperm whales were entangled in the California driftnet fishery – and died as a result.

Quote
“These driftnets are over a mile long, 100 feet deep, and designed to kill everything in their path,” said Paul Nicklen, SeaLegacy co-founder.
😟

The bycatch rate of driftnet fishing is staggeringly high. For some nets, the estimates are as high as seven to one – which means that for every swordfish, as many as seven other animals may be caught in the net. The California driftnet fishery has an estimated 65 percent bycatch rate – which, as Nicklen points out, makes it “the most destructive fishery in the U.S.” 😠
 
Many animals die when they become entangled in the huge nets, but not all do. As undercover observers found out, in some cases, instead of being freed with basic respect, live bycatch animals are severely maimed and discarded overboard – as if the animals were nothing but waste. 



http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/california-fisheries-responsible-killing-dolphins-turtles-whales/
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #81 on: May 02, 2018, 06:43:22 pm »


In Kenya, a Local Tribe Is Saving the Elephants 🐘 It Once Killed 😇

May 1, 2018

Yessenia Funes

SNIPPET:

The Samburu people of Kenya’s northern plains have been in conflict with elephants for years. Elephants and people both need water, and drought means there’s less to go around. The majestic animals also tear down acacia trees the Samburus’ livestock eat.

These are just a few of the reasons people in the region have a history of killing elephants.

But recently, the conflict has transformed into community. My Africa, a virtual reality film released Monday, puts viewers into the plains to see what a local, indigenous-led effort to protect elephants looks like.

The Samburu, who are nomadic livestock herders, have partnered with their local government since 2016 to raise and release injured and orphaned baby elephants in the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary. They now take care of more than 12 of these little kings and queens, forging a new relationship between humans and animals. It’s the first elephant orphanage in Africa that a local community owns and runs.

Released by Conservation International and narrated by Academy Award-winning actress Lupita Nyong’o, My Africa tells the tale of Kenya’s wildlife conservation as elephants fight for their very existence in the face of poaching and human-wildlife conflict.




Full article

https://earther.com/in-kenya-a-local-tribe-is-saving-the-elephants-it-once-1825693138
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #82 on: May 03, 2018, 04:43:10 pm »
National Parks Conservation Association

The Art and Science of Camera Trapping

Ryan Valdez, Ph.D.  Apr 27, 2018

SNIPPET:

The rise of camera trapping has allowed a growing number of volunteers to make significant contributions to academic research. Here’s a look at the practice, how these devices are used, and ways to get your own glimpses at wildlife “selfies” and help with ongoing research.

NPCA uses camera trapping to monitor pronghorn antelope crossing through modified fences throughout the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.    Photo by NPCA.


Our national parks and protected areas are vital habitat for numerous species of wildlife, and the ability to accurately survey and monitor them is important for their survival. A not-so-new technology is now sharply on the rise — camera trapping, a method by which a camera armed with infrared sensors is placed in the field to remotely capture time-lapsed images and video whenever the devices sense motion.

It can be difficult for wildlife biologists and park rangers to keep up with emerging threats to wildlife. Particularly with mammals, accurately documenting their presence and estimating their populations remains a challenge. Many of these species are nocturnal, travel great distances, have complex behavior and avoid humans. Additionally, species like the endangered jaguarundi in south Texas or the red wolf in North Carolina are so rare and elusive they are almost never seen. Camera traps allow people to see animals in the wild in ways that they otherwise simply could not.

Educational article with lots of great pictures:  👀  ;D

https://www.npca.org/resources/3236-the-art-and-science-of-camera-trapping
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #83 on: May 27, 2018, 12:03:55 pm »
Deadly Disease Threatens Deer, Elk, and Moose

LAUREN ANDERSON   |   MAY 22, 2018

Mule Deer. Credit: Greg Ochocki.

Wildlife face a host of threats in today’s changing world. Invasive species, habitat loss, and disease are often at the top of the list when wildlife managers talk about the pressures with which wildlife must contend. Wildlife disease is by far one of the scariest dangers. Many people have heard of chytrid fungus, which has decimated native frog species, and white-nose syndrome, which has had severe consequences for native bats. But there is another wildlife disease that has gotten less attention, though it poses an equal threat.

It is called chronic wasting disease (CWD) and it heavily impacts deer, elk, and moose in North America.

TAKE ACTION

Chronic wasting disease is a fatal disease with no known cure. Once contracted, there is not pathway back to health. It is a prion disease, like mad cow disease, that affects cervids (deer, elk, and moose), and symptoms include drastic weight loss (wasting), stumbling, listlessness and other neurologic symptoms.

White tailed deer. Credit: USFWS

The Spread of Chronic Wasting Disease

To date, chronic wasting disease has been detected in 24 states. The disease was first discovered in a captive breeding facility in 1967. It was then found in free-ranging elk in 1981 and was next found in free-ranging white-tailed deer in 1990.

More recently, chronic wasting disease was detected in Montana’s wildlife in late 2017 and just this year Mississippi had its first confirmed case when an infected white-tailed deer was found in Issaquena County. If the disease continues to spread and establish itself in new wild cervid populations, there is potential for a conservation crisis that could decimate wildlife populations.

Please join us is calling on the U. S. Department of Agriculture to ensure adequate surveillance, and prevent this devastating disease from spreading further.


https://blog.nwf.org/2018/05/deadly-disease-threatens-deer-elk-and-moose/
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #84 on: June 11, 2018, 09:10:11 pm »
June 11, 2018

Guardians and allies call for ending the War on Wildlife in new film

Watch, share, and engage
Across the American West, Guardians is fighting to protect wildlife from the many threats. From Ending the War on Wildlife by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s secretive “Wildlife Services” program to freeing our public lands from dangerous, indiscriminate traps and snares, we work tirelessly to create a new paradigm in wildlife conservation free of archaic tools of cruelty.

Because many people are not aware of the risks to wildlife and people on OUR public lands, we made a film to spread the word. Partnering with Mountain Standard Creative, we traveled across New Mexico talking to wildlife scientists, advocates, and people whose dogs were caught in traps. The result is a film that presents some of the most challenging issues in wildlife protection today and how we can move toward a brighter future.

We are proud to share our new film with you. Please watch and share far and wide.

For the Wolves,

Bethany Cotton, Wildlife Program Director

WATCH THE FILM


WildEarth Guardians ✨ protects and restores the wildlife, wild places, wild rivers, and health of the American West.

© 2018 WildEarth Guardians | MAIN OFFICE: 516 Alto Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501
p) 505.988.9126

http://wg.convio.net/site/MessageViewer?em_id=24441.0&dlv_id=41767&current=true&em_id=24441.0#.Wx8do4pKg2w
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #85 on: July 23, 2018, 01:32:37 pm »
The above is a picture of a dik dik. For the incredibly cute and cudly pictures of an orphaned baby dik dik (they are tiny!) walking over a keyboard and being given loving care, go here:






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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #86 on: July 31, 2018, 02:28:22 pm »
Grieving Mother Orca Has Been Carrying Her Calf’s Body for the Past 7 Days 😟

Estelle Rayburn

July 31, 2018 

In her research on orca whales (also known as “killer whales” though they are known for being quite the opposite), neurobiologist Lori Marino discovered that the limbic system — a group of structures in the brain which deal with emotions and the formation of memories — of these whales is “so large it erupts into the cortex in the form of an extra paralimbic lobe.” In plain words, this means that these majestic aquatic creatures may just be more emotionally aware than us humans.

In light of the orca’s high capacity for emotion, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that when a mother orca recently lost her just-born calf near Vancouver Island, she has reportedly been carrying the baby for the past seven days. This heartbreaking act of grief was witnessed by researchers from the Center for Whale Research, who were tracking the mother killer whale and her pod at the time of the calf’s death.

As the Center for Whale Research reportedly stated, “The baby’s carcass was sinking and being repeatedly retrieved by the mother, who was supporting it on her forehead and pushing it in choppy seas. The mother continued supporting and pushing the dead baby whale throughout the day until at least sunset.”

The incredibly sad death of this baby orca clearly had profound emotional impacts on the calf’s mother. And unfortunately, this type of occurrence — a killer whale calf dying mere days after birth — is not at all uncommon in the present day.

As far as scientists can tell, Southern Resident killer whales like the mother in this story have not had a successful birth in three years. In fact, over the last two decades, the Center for Whale Research estimates that only 25 percent of the newborn calves have survived.

Ken Balcomb, Founder of the research center, offered some insight into how humans are playing a major role in the plight of these gentle giants. “The cause [of the birth rate] is lack of sufficient food resources in their foraging area,” Balcomb reportedly told CNN. He added, “There’s not enough food, and that’s due to environmental reasons.”

More specifically, humans are rapidly lowering the population of Chinook salmon — the orca’s main food source — by polluting and destroying their oceanic habitats, not to mention harvesting the fish at rapid rates.

In turn, we are causing widespread food scarcity for these whales, thus resulting in an unprecedentedly high rate of miscarriages and making it extremely difficult for the whales to give their surviving young the proper nutrition. With the population growth of this species seriously stunted, only 75 Southern Resident orcas remain in the wild, putting these precious creatures at a high risk of disappearing from the planet for good if we don’t soon take action to protect them.

If you’d like to learn more about what these poor whales are up against and find out how you can help give them a fighting chance for survival, check out these helpful resources: (at article link)

• There Will be More Plastic in the Oceans Than Fish by 2050 – Here’s How You Can Help!

• 10 Alarming Facts About Overfishing

• Vivid and Stunning Photo Campaign Reveals the True Cost of Holding Orcas and Dolphins Captive

• 10 Simple Actions That Just Might Save Our World’s Oceans From Plastic

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/grieving-mother-orca-carrying-calfs-body/
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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #87 on: July 31, 2018, 08:24:52 pm »


Hapag-Lloyd Cruises Faces Outrage After Guard Kills Polar Bear During Arctic Cruise Excursion

July 30, 2018 by gCaptain

MS Bremen. Photo: Hapag-Lloyd Cruises

German cruise line operator Hapag-Lloyd Cruises has found itself in the middle of an online firestorm after a guard shot and killed a polar bear during a shore excursion to an Arctic archipelago from one of its expedition cruise ships over the weekend.

In a statement posted to Facebook on Sunday, Hapag-Lloyd Cruises says it “very much regrets” the incident but made clear that lethal measures against the polar bear were taken purely out of self-defense.

The incident occurred Saturday as the company’s cruise ship Bremen was stopped in Spitsbergen, the largest island of the Svalbard archipelago, for an excursion.

According to the cruise line, a four-man armed security detail was securing the landing area in preparation for guests when out of nowhere the polar bear attacked one of the guards, inflicting non-lethal injuries that required medical attention.

“The guard suffered head injuries, however, he was responsive after the attack and was airlifted. He is out of danger, with no threat to life. In an act of self-defence, unfortunately, it was necessary for the polar bear to be shot dead. We very much regret this incident. Hapag-Lloyd Cruises is very aware of its responsibility when travelling in environmentally-sensitive areas and respects all nature and wildlife,” Hapag-Lloyd said.

In its statement, the cruise operator provided the following account of the incident:

“The incident occurred when the four-person polar bear guard team, who are always on board for these expedition cruises as required by law, prepared for a shore leave. One of the guards was unexpectedly attacked by a polar bear that had not been spotted and he was unable to react himself. As the attempts of the other guards to evict the animal, unfortunately, were not successful, there had to be intervention for reasons of self-defence and to protect the life of the attacked person. The injured person was immediately provided with medical care and flown to a hospital with a rescue helicopter. We are in personal, direct contact with him. His condition is stable and he remains responsive.”

Despite its explanation, the cruise line was intensely criticized online over the incident, with many calling for a boycott of the company.

“‘Let’s get too close to a polar bear in its natural environment and then kill it if it gets too close,’ Morons,” tweeted comedian Ricky Gervais. Others also accused the company of exploiting polar bears for profit.

In its statement, Hapag-Lloyd Cruises defended its shore excursion practices, insisting that they are not meant for polar bear observation.

“To illustrate the situation: Spitzbergen is a large geographical area, about one and a half times the size of Denmark. Landings are possible only in a few places; these are not there to serve the purpose of polar bear observation, on the contrary: polar bears are only observed from aboard ships, from a safe distance. To prepare for a shore leave, the polar bear guards go ashore in advance after sighting the landing site as a group and without passengers. They then set up a land station and check the area again to make sure that there are no polar bears in sight. As soon as such an animal approaches, the shore leave would be stopped immediately,” the company wrote on Facebook.

As of Monday, Hapag-Lloyd Cruises’ Facebook post about the incident had over 1,000 comments, many of them negative.

The MS Bremen was built in 1990 and can hold 155 passengers and 100 crew.

Hapag-Lloyd Cruises says it is working with Norwegian authorities to fully investigate the circumstances of the incident.

http://gcaptain.com/hapag-lloyd-cruises-faces-outrage-after-guard-kills-polar-bear-during-arctic-cruise/
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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #88 on: August 13, 2018, 02:16:35 pm »
🐻 Grizzly Bear technique for relieving back itch: ;D 

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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #89 on: September 27, 2018, 04:56:09 pm »
 

September 27, 2018

Judge Blocks 'Energy Dominance' Policy on Public Land


Sage grouse

Win for the West

A federal judge has blocked a Trump "energy dominance" policy slashing public and environmental review of oil and gas leasing on public lands. The injunction bans the Bureau of Land Management from using the policy on more than 67 million acres in 11 western states.

Lease sales slated for December — spanning hundreds of thousands of acres of sage-grouse habitat — must now face full public and environmental review.

"This is good news for public lands and the millions of people who love them," said the Center's Taylor McKinnon. Read more.
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