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Author Topic: Defending Wildlife  (Read 1692 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #75 on: February 15, 2018, 01:59:32 pm »
 

This yearling ringed seal was rescued off Unalaska in 2017 and treated at Alaska SeaLife Center. (Alaska SeaLife Center)

Win:🌟 Protection Upheld for Arctic's Ringed Seals 

We celebrated this week when the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Endangered Species Act protection for ringed seals, Arctic ice seals threatened by climate change. The ruling reverses a 2016 lower-court decision that rejected protection for the seals, which give birth in snow caves built on top of sea ice. Global warming is causing caves to collapse and leaving pups vulnerable to death by freezing or predation.

The Center for Biological Diversity petitioned to protect these seals in 2008. Four years later they were put on the endangered species list — but the oil industry and the state of Alaska challenged that decision.

"The decision underscores the recklessness of the Trump 🦀 administration's proposal to open up the Arctic Ocean to oil drilling ," said the Center's Kristen Monsell. "Ringed seals have a shot at survival thanks to the Endangered Species Act, but only if we rapidly reduce the greenhouse pollution destroying their habitat."

Read more in Anchorage Daily News.

https://www.adn.com/alaska-news/environment/2018/02/12/court-approves-threatened-species-status-for-ringed-seals-in-alaska/

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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #76 on: March 11, 2018, 04:28:03 pm »
Something Mysterious Is Killing Captive Gorillas  :(

Just before 8 o’clock on a snowy Wednesday morning, deep in a maze of doors and steel fencing in the basement of the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, a 30-year-old gorilla named Mokolo is getting a heart ex…
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #77 on: March 11, 2018, 04:39:36 pm »


The Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced last week that it will now consider all permits for importing elephant trophies from African nations on a “case-by-case basis," breaking from President T…
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #78 on: March 30, 2018, 02:29:24 pm »
Victory! Turtles Return to Beach That Used to Be Covered in Plastic Trash After Massive Clean Up Effort

Aleksandra Pajda

March 30, 2018 



http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/turtles-return-beach-covered-plastic-trash/
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #79 on: April 03, 2018, 05:52:56 pm »
WildEarth GUARDIANS

VICTORY

Ensuring Lobos Will Roam their Southwestern Homelands

April 2, 2018

Celebrating a Win for Wolves

Last week we celebrated the 20th anniversary of the return of Mexican wolves to the wilds of Arizona and New Mexico. This week we celebrate the most significant legal victory for lobos in years. We couldn’t have done it without you.

In 2013, the federal government began a process to change how wolves, including Mexican wolves, were managed. We called on you to speak out against weakening protections and you answered: you signed petitions, sent comments, came to rallies and testified at hearings. Together, we laid the groundwork for a lawsuit challenging the government’s flawed plan that capped the Mexican wolf population at less than half what leading scientists say is necessary for recovery, limited where Mexican wolves can roam, liberalized trapping and killing wolves at the behest of the livestock industry and labeled the wolves “non-essential” to the species’ survival in the wild, a designation that allows weak protections.

Yesterday a federal judge agreed with us  and criticized the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for ignoring scientists who sounded the alarm. Now the Service must create management guidelines that do not merely keep lobos hovering on the brink, but will truly recover this critically imperiled species. At just 114 wolves in the wild, the need is urgent.

Today we celebrate. Tomorrow we go back to work.   

http://www.wildearthguardians.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=13424&news_iv_ctrl=1681#.WsP0LIjwY2y
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #80 on: April 13, 2018, 04:33:45 pm »
One Green Planet 🍃

April 13, 2018

Investigation Reveals California Fisheries Are Responsible for Killing Hundreds of Dolphins, Turtles, and Whales 😱

By Aleksandra Pajda

SNIPPET:

An undercover investigation carried out off the coast of California by animal rights and marine conservation groups Mercy for Animals, Turtle Island Restoration Network, SeaLegacy, and Sharkwater has discovered the shocking hidden effects of the driftnet fishing industry. It was found that besides the targeted swordfish, marine mammals like dolphins, sea lions, sea turtles, sharks, and even seabirds are dying in these massive nets that are essentially walls of floating netting. Some of these species are even considered threatened or endangered. In 2017, two endangered sperm whales were entangled in the California driftnet fishery – and died as a result.

Quote
“These driftnets are over a mile long, 100 feet deep, and designed to kill everything in their path,” said Paul Nicklen, SeaLegacy co-founder.
😟

The bycatch rate of driftnet fishing is staggeringly high. For some nets, the estimates are as high as seven to one – which means that for every swordfish, as many as seven other animals may be caught in the net. The California driftnet fishery has an estimated 65 percent bycatch rate – which, as Nicklen points out, makes it “the most destructive fishery in the U.S.” 😠
 
Many animals die when they become entangled in the huge nets, but not all do. As undercover observers found out, in some cases, instead of being freed with basic respect, live bycatch animals are severely maimed and discarded overboard – as if the animals were nothing but waste. 



http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/california-fisheries-responsible-killing-dolphins-turtles-whales/
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #81 on: May 02, 2018, 06:43:22 pm »


In Kenya, a Local Tribe Is Saving the Elephants 🐘 It Once Killed 😇

May 1, 2018

Yessenia Funes

SNIPPET:

The Samburu people of Kenya’s northern plains have been in conflict with elephants for years. Elephants and people both need water, and drought means there’s less to go around. The majestic animals also tear down acacia trees the Samburus’ livestock eat.

These are just a few of the reasons people in the region have a history of killing elephants.

But recently, the conflict has transformed into community. My Africa, a virtual reality film released Monday, puts viewers into the plains to see what a local, indigenous-led effort to protect elephants looks like.

The Samburu, who are nomadic livestock herders, have partnered with their local government since 2016 to raise and release injured and orphaned baby elephants in the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary. They now take care of more than 12 of these little kings and queens, forging a new relationship between humans and animals. It’s the first elephant orphanage in Africa that a local community owns and runs.

Released by Conservation International and narrated by Academy Award-winning actress Lupita Nyong’o, My Africa tells the tale of Kenya’s wildlife conservation as elephants fight for their very existence in the face of poaching and human-wildlife conflict.




Full article

https://earther.com/in-kenya-a-local-tribe-is-saving-the-elephants-it-once-1825693138
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #82 on: May 03, 2018, 04:43:10 pm »
National Parks Conservation Association

The Art and Science of Camera Trapping

Ryan Valdez, Ph.D.  Apr 27, 2018

SNIPPET:

The rise of camera trapping has allowed a growing number of volunteers to make significant contributions to academic research. Here’s a look at the practice, how these devices are used, and ways to get your own glimpses at wildlife “selfies” and help with ongoing research.

NPCA uses camera trapping to monitor pronghorn antelope crossing through modified fences throughout the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.    Photo by NPCA.


Our national parks and protected areas are vital habitat for numerous species of wildlife, and the ability to accurately survey and monitor them is important for their survival. A not-so-new technology is now sharply on the rise — camera trapping, a method by which a camera armed with infrared sensors is placed in the field to remotely capture time-lapsed images and video whenever the devices sense motion.

It can be difficult for wildlife biologists and park rangers to keep up with emerging threats to wildlife. Particularly with mammals, accurately documenting their presence and estimating their populations remains a challenge. Many of these species are nocturnal, travel great distances, have complex behavior and avoid humans. Additionally, species like the endangered jaguarundi in south Texas or the red wolf in North Carolina are so rare and elusive they are almost never seen. Camera traps allow people to see animals in the wild in ways that they otherwise simply could not.

Educational article with lots of great pictures:  👀  ;D

https://www.npca.org/resources/3236-the-art-and-science-of-camera-trapping
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #83 on: May 27, 2018, 12:03:55 pm »
Deadly Disease Threatens Deer, Elk, and Moose

LAUREN ANDERSON   |   MAY 22, 2018

Mule Deer. Credit: Greg Ochocki.

Wildlife face a host of threats in today’s changing world. Invasive species, habitat loss, and disease are often at the top of the list when wildlife managers talk about the pressures with which wildlife must contend. Wildlife disease is by far one of the scariest dangers. Many people have heard of chytrid fungus, which has decimated native frog species, and white-nose syndrome, which has had severe consequences for native bats. But there is another wildlife disease that has gotten less attention, though it poses an equal threat.

It is called chronic wasting disease (CWD) and it heavily impacts deer, elk, and moose in North America.

TAKE ACTION

Chronic wasting disease is a fatal disease with no known cure. Once contracted, there is not pathway back to health. It is a prion disease, like mad cow disease, that affects cervids (deer, elk, and moose), and symptoms include drastic weight loss (wasting), stumbling, listlessness and other neurologic symptoms.

White tailed deer. Credit: USFWS

The Spread of Chronic Wasting Disease

To date, chronic wasting disease has been detected in 24 states. The disease was first discovered in a captive breeding facility in 1967. It was then found in free-ranging elk in 1981 and was next found in free-ranging white-tailed deer in 1990.

More recently, chronic wasting disease was detected in Montana’s wildlife in late 2017 and just this year Mississippi had its first confirmed case when an infected white-tailed deer was found in Issaquena County. If the disease continues to spread and establish itself in new wild cervid populations, there is potential for a conservation crisis that could decimate wildlife populations.

Please join us is calling on the U. S. Department of Agriculture to ensure adequate surveillance, and prevent this devastating disease from spreading further.


https://blog.nwf.org/2018/05/deadly-disease-threatens-deer-elk-and-moose/
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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #84 on: June 11, 2018, 09:10:11 pm »
June 11, 2018

Guardians and allies call for ending the War on Wildlife in new film

Watch, share, and engage
Across the American West, Guardians is fighting to protect wildlife from the many threats. From Ending the War on Wildlife by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s secretive “Wildlife Services” program to freeing our public lands from dangerous, indiscriminate traps and snares, we work tirelessly to create a new paradigm in wildlife conservation free of archaic tools of cruelty.

Because many people are not aware of the risks to wildlife and people on OUR public lands, we made a film to spread the word. Partnering with Mountain Standard Creative, we traveled across New Mexico talking to wildlife scientists, advocates, and people whose dogs were caught in traps. The result is a film that presents some of the most challenging issues in wildlife protection today and how we can move toward a brighter future.

We are proud to share our new film with you. Please watch and share far and wide.

For the Wolves,

Bethany Cotton, Wildlife Program Director

WATCH THE FILM


WildEarth Guardians ✨ protects and restores the wildlife, wild places, wild rivers, and health of the American West.

© 2018 WildEarth Guardians | MAIN OFFICE: 516 Alto Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501
p) 505.988.9126

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