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Author Topic: Defending Wildlife  (Read 8088 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Defending Wildlife
« Reply #120 on: June 02, 2021, 02:53:35 pm »

Nature Conservancy Photo Contest

MEMORABLE MOMENTS Fox kits on a log in Menasha, Wisconsin. © Christopher Appleby /TNC Photo Contest 2019

As excitement builds for this year’s Nature Conservancy Photo Contest, Photo Editor Alex Snyder reflects on a memorable moment from 2019: “The body language between the two is what really makes this frame. The use of a shallow depth of field helps separate the kits from the busy background of branches and leaves and lets us focus in on this interaction.”

Be the first to know when this year's Photo Contest opens, what the prizes are and more.

Agelbert NOTE: Scroll down to the plethora of fantastic photos at the Contest Web Page!

Here's a small selection of several you can feast your eyes on:






Light is sown for the righteous, and gladness for the upright in heart. Ps. 97:11

AGelbert

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Meet the Tiniest Owl in the World
« Reply #121 on: June 09, 2021, 04:34:34 pm »
National Audubon Society

Elf Owl (micrathene whitneyi)
Though small, an Elf Owl has no problem taking on a scorpion when it's dinner time. Photo: Bettina Arrigoni/Flickr CC (BY 2.0)

Meet the Tiniest Owl in the World
Native to the American Southwest, Elf Owls are slightly larger than a soda can, but that doesn't stop them from being determined predators. Flying out from its tree cavity at dusk, the Elf Owl hunts beetles, crickets, and spiders, plus the odd lizard or mouse. Larger prey such as scorpions — with the stingers carefully removed — may end up cached in the nest for later dining.


Standing less than six inches tall, feathered in gray with big yellow eyes, the Elf Owl weighs less than an ounce and a half — a bit less than a golf ball.


This audio story is brought to you by BirdNote, a partner of The National Audubon Society. BirdNote episodes air daily on public radio stations nationwide.

🔊 Podcast 

Credits:

Written by Bob Sundstrom

Producer: John Kessler

Executive Producer: Sallie Bodie

Narrator: Michael Stein

Bird sounds provided by The Macaulay Library of Natural Sounds at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York. 105533 recorded by Geoffrey A. Keller, 188270 recorded by Bob McGuire.

BirdNote’s theme music was composed and played by Nancy Rumbel and John Kessler.

© 2017 Tune In to Nature.org   March 2017   






Light is sown for the righteous, and gladness for the upright in heart. Ps. 97:11

AGelbert

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By Olivia Rosane Jun. 11, 2021
A gray wolf. John & Karen Hollingsworth / USFWS

First Wolf Litter Born in Colorado After 80 Years

The state of Colorado just welcomed its first wolf pups in the first 80 years.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) announced earlier this week that it had spotted at least three gray wolf pups in the wild. They were spotted by a CPW biologist and a CPW district wildlife manager alongside parents M2101, or "John," and F1084 , or "Jane." It's possible there could be more pups in the area. Wildlife officials are excited at the sight of the pups but are keeping their distance to protect the young wolves.

Read more:

https://www.ecowatch.com/wolf-litter-born-colorado-2653329162.html
Light is sown for the righteous, and gladness for the upright in heart. Ps. 97:11

AGelbert

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Greater Yellowlegs. Photo: Melissa James/Audubon Photography Awards

By Jessica Grannis
Interim Vice President, Coastal Conservation, National Audubon Society

A Decisive Victory for the Most Important Coastal Law You’ve Never Heard of

Audubon won a lawsuit to prevent sand mining on protected beaches and plans to expand this powerful policy.

SNIPPETS:

or decades, the CBRA also prevented removal or mining of sand from areas protected by the law to nourish beaches outside of the CBRA System. The drafters of the law recognized that beach nourishment—replacing sand on a beach after it has washed away—would be an expensive and never-ending undertaking in these highly dynamic, storm-prone areas of our coast. And for decades, Republican and Democratic administrations alike enforced these restrictions.

But in 2019, Trump’s Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt broke the law when he abruptly reversed this long-standing policy. Just six days after he received a letter from three Members of Congress asking him to “correct” the law, he illegally authorized sand to be taken from CBRA-protected areas, allowing the destabilization and erosion of America’s important barrier islands. ...  ...

Last month, we received some exciting news for birds and communities on our coasts. One year since Audubon filed suit against the Trump Administration’s illegal rule to allow sand mining on beaches protected by the Coastal Barrier Resources Act, the Biden Administration reversed this rule.

This is a crucial victory to keep our pristine, undeveloped beaches intact, where they provide a home for coastal birds and a buffer for nearby communities from storm surges and rising seas. But if you’ve never heard of the decades-old Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA) or why it’s so important, you’re not alone.

The CBRA is a little-known, bipartisan law, signed by President Reagan in 1982, and upheld by every presidential administration since then. It protects one of our nation’s most unique and important resources—the long, continuous chain of barrier islands and the associated beaches and wetlands that line the Atlantic Coast, the Gulf of Mexico, Great Lakes, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The CBRA System includes national treasures like Assateague Island and Cape Hatteras, known for their huge, sprawling sand dunes and unique wildlife.

Full article:

https://www.audubon.org/news/a-decisive-victory-most-important-coastal-law-youve-never-heard
Light is sown for the righteous, and gladness for the upright in heart. Ps. 97:11

AGelbert

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Sep 4, 2021

🐆 Ganesh & 🐅 Vithal's Heartwarming Bond

Wildlife SOS 51.9K subscribers

Rescued leopards Vithal (R) and Ganesh (L) are a rare example of a deep bond between two adult males.

Ganesh suffered a major eye injury when he was trapped in a conflict situation and has cataract on the left eye. On the other hand, Vithal had lost his right hind paw to a deadly snare trap.

As life in the wild was not feasible for either of them, Ganesh and Vithal were given a permanent home at the #ManikdohLeopardRescueCentre in Junnar, Maharashtra.

Today, they perform an important role as conservation ambassadors to sensitize people about the threats that leopards face in India.
Light is sown for the righteous, and gladness for the upright in heart. Ps. 97:11

AGelbert

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Wild, Incisive, Fearless

October 22, 2021


Vanishing: What Are Pikas Trying to Tell Us?

Sometimes the smallest animals have the 📢 biggest things to say. For our latest Vanishing essay, writer Laura Dassow Walls treks into the Cascade Mountains, her ear attuned for the eep! eep! of pikas.

Besides being ridiculously cute — and teaching us volumes about how we’re swiftly altering the planet — pikas are also a lesson in survival and resilience.

Read the essay and check out the rest in the Vanishing series  , which examines the human toll of the vanishing wild.

Mountain Moment: Call of the Pika
Light is sown for the righteous, and gladness for the upright in heart. Ps. 97:11

AGelbert

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Whiskered Screech-Owl by Amanda Guercio Shutterstock

Sky-Island Specialty:
Whiskered Screech-Owl


A well-camouflaged little raptor, the Whiskered Screech-Owl’s U.S. population even managed to hide from scientists until almost the dawn of the 20th century. It’s easy to see why it took a while: Although a bit smaller and with slightly more heavily scalloped underparts, the Whiskered Screech-Owl very closely resembles the two other U.S. screech-owls, the Western and the Eastern. Once documented, the bird currently known as the Whiskered Screech-Owl was initially called the Arizona Whiskered Owl and Spotted Screech-Owl.


In the U.S., the Whiskered Screech-Owl only occurs in the “Sky Islands,” mountains rising from the desert in southeastern Arizona and an adjacent dollop of southwestern New Mexico, but the species’ range extends far southward, through the mountains of Mexico and into Central America as far south as Nicaragua. Aptly named, this bird does have longer, thicker facial plumes than its cousins, but these are usually only seen with the bird “in hand,” or in close-up, zoomed-in photos.

The Whiskered Screech-Owl often lives at higher elevations than its look-alike neighbor the Western, but the two species do occur in some of the same places. In such situations, the best way for birders to parse out the two species is by listening to them because, usually, they are easily separated by sounds they make.

How can you identify two co-occurring, near-identical screech-owls with your eyes closed?

Read on to find out more:
https://abcbirds.org/bird/whiskered-screech-owl/

Light is sown for the righteous, and gladness for the upright in heart. Ps. 97:11

AGelbert

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Intelligent Survivor: American Crow
« Reply #127 on: November 05, 2021, 07:54:07 pm »
American Crow

Intelligent Survivor: American Crow

The American Crow is widespread in North America and, like the Blue Jay, is often maligned and misunderstood. In folklore, the crow is sometimes associated with witchcraft and evil, or is thought to signify misfortune and even death. One popular term for a group of crows is a "murder"! Often considered a pest, bird’s name is used in association with stuffed manikins and movie characters — scarecrows — meant to frighten them from crops. Other cultures appreciate the crow's intelligence and adaptability, portraying it as an ingenious trickster that can foresee the future, and that sometimes helps humankind.   

Male and female American Crows look alike, with all-black plumage that has an iridescent purple sheen in direct light. Corvus, the first part of the American Crow's scientific name, simply means “crow,” and its species name brachyrhynchos means "short beak" — which is true only in comparison to its larger, similar-looking relative the Common Raven. The crow's beak is actually fairly large — 2.5 inches long — stout, and slightly hooked, with stiff bristles over the nostrils.

This common bird is an uncommonly intelligent survivor, able to cope with human pressures that have almost eradicated many bird species. Find out how the American Crow even managed to outlast an introduced avian epidemic!


Read On to Find Out More:
Light is sown for the righteous, and gladness for the upright in heart. Ps. 97:11

AGelbert

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The Birds I Never Met | North America's Extinct Birds
« Reply #128 on: November 14, 2021, 05:37:08 pm »
Nov 9, 2021 115,189 views :o👍

The Birds I Never Met | North America's Extinct Birds


Atlas Pro 965K subscribers

Recently I looked into a number of extinct birds from all around the world, but few of them shed light on those that I would've lived alongside. Today we're "borrowing" my mom's field guide on the Birds of Eastern and Central North America to learn about those birds that I might've witnessed had I been alive only a century ago!

Support me on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/atlaspro

Agelbert COMMENT:
SNIPPET:
👍👍👍 Excellent video!
As to those irresponsible greedballs who irrationally criticized you by pushing the "justification" for new extinctions (CAUSED BY HUMANS) as "no big deal because, uh, Darwin",  I suspect they work for the 🦖 Hydrocarbon 😈 Hellspawn (otherwise known as the Fossil Fuel "Industry"). These Profit over Planet Biosphere Destroyers will stoop to any cheap rationalization to "justify" IGNORING the Catastrophic Climate Change FACTS. 😠

"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." -- Aldous Huxley
« Last Edit: November 14, 2021, 07:43:02 pm by AGelbert »
Light is sown for the righteous, and gladness for the upright in heart. Ps. 97:11

AGelbert

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Biodiversity: Nature by Another Name
« Reply #129 on: December 01, 2021, 05:40:52 pm »
Agelbert RANT: Beyond the usual wishful thinking about how "solvable" the climate crisis is AND the complete lack of finger pointing at the profit over planet polluters (i.e. NO demands for prosecuting/bankrupting the polluters and NO recommended TEETH for laws and regulations to prevent continued degradation of the biosphere for short term profit) that are TOTALLY (NOT "partially") responsible for Catastrophic Climate Change, this article is based on facts. The problem with stating the biosphere degradation facts resulting from our climate crisis, while studiously ignoring the gigantic elephant in the room FACT that the 😈🦖🐍 humans in charge of the polluter corporations are NOT going to stop as long as they are not prosecuted for their profit over planet ecocide is that we-the-people will accomplsh NADA to stop the ‘Insect Armageddon’ discussed here or any other extinction causing result of Catastrophic Climate Change. Yeah, that is a problem, to put it mildly. What really burns me is how these scientists can harbor the incredibly naive opinion that we can fix this "together" because, uh. we are "all" in this together.

NO, we are NOT all in this together. The polluters have every reason, based on their morally bankrupt ideology, to not care a hoot what happens to most of the biosphere, including the extinction of several high order mammalian vertebrate species, as long as their profit over planet corruption of governments all over the world continues unpunished and unabated. The polluters are morally depraved Social Darwinists. They will, with a straight face, calmly tell you that species have gone extinct since life has "evolved" on this planet and apex predaters like them need not be concerned with ANY species that goes extinct due to pollution from a 😈 profitable "business Model". These moral reprobates actually believe that any species that goes extinct, no matter how important scientists think that species is, "deserves" to go extinct if it went extinct. This is circular thinking insanity in the extreme, but ALL 🦍 Social Darwinsits swear by this irrational rejection of altruistic behavior on behalf of the biosphere in general (and humans they exploit in particular) in order to "justifiy" their wanton degradation of the biosphere for short term profit. They are true believers in technofixes, even if scientists tell them there ain't no technofix for the extinction of a keystone species. ANYTHING that questions their morally bankrupt "might equals right" ideology is rejected.

The problem with too many scientists is that they think of the Climate Crisis as a biological math problem to be solved. rather than a DIRECT CAUSE of the moral depravity of polluters. As long as the climate Crisis is not labelled as  a MORAL CRISIS, asking we-the-people to do our part to save nature, something 90% PLUS of humanity already DOES, will not work BECAUSE LESS than 5% of humanity is doing over 99% of the pollution! It is like these scientists, people who are great at math from the time they were knee high to a grasshopper, deciding to forget how to add and subtract when the blame for worldwide (OVERWHELMINGLY CAUSED BY THE HYDROCARBON "Industry") biosphere degradation needs to be SPECIFICALLY tallied up.

Nature underpins every aspect of human existenceand it is in crisis

KEY TAKEAWAYS

📢 Biodiversity underpins every aspect of life on our planet—but it's currently declining at an unprecedented rate.
֍ To reverse this trend, we must find better ways to manage humanity's footprint on land and sea—and new ways to fund this work.
֍ The year ahead will be crucial, as members of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity reconvene in China in 2021 and early 2022 to agree on a new global framework for protecting nature.

Whether you live in a large coastal city or a small town in the foothills; work in agriculture, engineering or finance; live off the land or consider yourself an urban warrior; whether you consciously realize it or not, we all need nature.


BIODIVERSITY EXPLAINED (3:05) What if all the variety on the planet disappeared? It could happen. Extinctions are happening faster than ever. If we remove too many pieces the health of our environment, food supply, and economies could crumble. But if we can agree to prioritize biodiversity, we can save the planet and ourselves.

This variety of life, the communities they form, and habitats in which they live make up the fabric of life—biodiversity. It underpins planetary health and informs everything down to the taste of a grain, the strand of a cloth and a sip of water, supporting our most basic needs. Yet, nature and wildlife are declining around the world at an unprecedented rate.


THE COST OF LOSING NATURE

The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) recently warned that we are exploiting nature far more rapidly than it can renew itself, driving extinctions up to 1,000 times faster than the background “natural rate.” The report also spells out that up to one million known species could disappear by 2050. Invertebrates, in particular, are disappearing so quickly that some scientists are warning of a looming ‘Insect Armageddon.’

That species loss comes at a price—both literally and figuratively. While the intrinsic value of nature is priceless, economists have estimated that nature also contributes trillions of dollars  to the global economy each year, in the form of ecosystem services – natural processes like pollination and the provision of water. We know, for instance, that 75 percent of global food crops rely on pollination; that forests filter and store 40 percent of the water for the world’s largest urban areas; and coastal habitats like coral reefs and mangroves buffer us from floods and storms while also absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Beyond these essential services, other cultural and physical aspects of our relationship to nature, although less easy to quantify, are arguably just as important to our quality of life.

PROTECT THE BEST—BUT ALSO MANAGE THE REST

Climate breakdown is already making it clear that the future of human development depends on rethinking our relationship with the natural world. The biodiversity crisis further reinforces the need for urgency. The Nature Conservancy (TNC) is part of a global effort to preserve the world’s remaining wild and near-natural habitats, with the goal of protecting 30 percent of the planet by 2030. But it’s not enough to simply create more protected areas on land and at sea—we also need to address the root causes of biodiversity loss.

The biggest direct drivers causing this steep decline are massive land-use changes, climate change, pollution, resource use and exploitation, and invasive species. Agricultural expansion in the past fifty years has resulted in the degradation of intact forests, especially in the tropics, but cities and roads have also encroached upon natural landscapes. Marine ecosystems, meanwhile, are in a dire state from the cumulative impacts of overfishing, pollution, and climate-related drivers like ocean warming, acidification and deoxygenation.

ESPIRITU SANTO ISLAND A sea lion hunts in Los Islotes in Espiritu Santo Island in La Paz Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico © Alfredo Martinez Fernandez/TNC Photo Contest 2019

Addressing these issues means fundamentally changing the way we manage humanity’s footprint on land and sea. We can—and must—grow more food through regenerative agricultural practices that seek to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and protect soil and biodiversity. In addition to halting deforestation and other habitat conversion, we can better manage working forests in ways that preserve as many species as possible without sacrificing sustainable production. In areas that have already been degraded, we must restore and regenerate forests and other landscapes. Degraded lands also offer opportunities to site infrastructure in ways that meet human needs with minimal impact to nature.

At sea, we need to better manage fisheries, create safe havens in the ocean, and build resilience along our coasts. One bright spot: a new agreement for biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction (more than 200 nautical miles from shore) aims to protect the world’s high seas. The agreement should be completed during the fourth and final round of talks in spring 2020.


INVEST IN SUSTAINABLE PATHWAYS

Make no mistake: achieving all this within the timescales required to avert ecological catastrophe will require massive and transformative changes in our global economies and financial systems. For example, the hundreds of billions of dollars in public subsidies currently directed towards the agriculture sector, originally intended to make food cheaper and more plentiful, have hidden costs for both nature and human health by too often effectively incentivizing unsustainable farming practices and unhealthy eating. Such funds should ideally be reallocated in ways that support healthy food production while also benefiting nature.

Rethinking public spending alone isn’t enough, though—we’ll also have to unlock or redirect new sources of funding for nature, including from the private sector. Too often the economic value of the services nature provides—the way forests filter and recharge groundwater, for example—go unrecognized and unvalued. But quantifying these values opens the door to investing directly in nature in ways that can deliver both financial returns and conservation benefits. To start to manage the conservation crisis, we need to be looking for conservation finance solutions that can easily scale to deliver billions of dollars per year, every year.

The Nature Conservancy has pioneered the use of water funds—localized arrangements where urban water users pay into a fund that then invests in conservation and improved agricultural practices in the upper watershed.  Source watersheds provide water for the largest cities on the planet; they represent one third of the Earth’s surface, sustain more than 1.7 billion people and are home to more than 50 percent of the planet’s endangered terrestrial species.

In many cases, these investments in “natural infrastructure” are a more cost-effective way to secure water quality improvements compared with traditional ‘gray infrastructure’ solutions like water filtration plants.  Considering that the world spends around half a trillion dollars a year on water infrastructure, nature can improve the return on that investment by providing cleaner drinking water for hundreds of cities for less.  That’s a multi-billion dollar investment proposition with a negative financial cost.

PORTRAIT OF SAM 'OHUKANI'ŌHI' A GON III Senior Scientist and Cultural Advisor at the Nature Conservancy, Hawai'i Program, Maunawili Falls Trail, Oíahu, Hawai'i © Ian Shive

COMMIT TO NATURE

The year ahead is crucial for tackling these major ecological and systemic threats. In early 2021, when the UN Convention on Biodiversity reconvenes in Kunming, China, 196 national governments will have the opportunity to make an ambitious commitment to biodiversity protection—one that fully recognizes the value of nature across society and government. Momentum is also building through a public voice and a movement creating a demand for nature.



The natural world is not a faraway place: it is our world. Large-scale ecological collapse in such a short period of time has happened just five times in geological history. Historically, however, mass extinctions were caused by catastrophic events like asteroid collisions and volcanos. This time, human activities and the planet’s runaway transformation is happening on our watch.

The good news is that the way forward is in our hands, too—but only if we are willing to make the creative, political and financial decisions necessary today to avoid almost unimaginable consequences in the future. The nature we need is under threat; but it is also profoundly resilient and can regenerate if we work with it instead of against it.  A strong agreement between countries charting a way forward, underpinned with the financial wherewithal to make it stick, would be two credible and necessary steps to change course next year and truly mobilize for nature.

https://www.nature.org/en-us/what-we-do/our-insights/perspectives/biodiversity-crisis-nature-underpins-human-existence/

Agelbert NOTE: As long as the "WE" mentioned above does not include the polluters degrading the biosphere for profit 24/7 AND corrupting our governmetns 24/7 to force we-the-people to PAY THEM "subsidies" so they can make even more money while they poison us, NO credible and necessary steps to change course next year, or any other year, to mobilze for nature, will take place. This is not hard to figure out; If you don't stop a murdering crook, he will murder and steal more, PERIOD.







« Last Edit: December 03, 2021, 12:43:13 pm by AGelbert »
Light is sown for the righteous, and gladness for the upright in heart. Ps. 97:11

 

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