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Author Topic: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth  (Read 9647 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #300 on: February 16, 2018, 04:55:06 pm »

100% Renewable Electricity Worldwide Is A New Cost-Effective 🌟 Reality

February 16th, 2018 by The Beam

By Hans-Josef Fell, Energy Watch Group, and Prof. Dr. Christian Breyer, Lappeenranta University of Technology

Last year, Costa Rica beat its own record. The Central American country ran 300 days on electricity generated solely from renewable energy. Following the steps of Norway and Iceland, Costa Rica is about to showcase to the world how an emerging country can succeed in transitioning to a fossil-free electricity system.

Renewable energy is increasingly a success story in emerging and developing markets. Last year, they were leading in green energy investments. China will have added around 54 gigawatts (GW) of solar PV capacity in 2017  —  three times more than any other country has ever done, which tops China’s total amount to 120 GW of solar PV installed capacity. India is catching up too, as its government announced it would tender enough renewable energy projects to surpass 200 GW of new green capacity by 2022. According to financial analysts, by 2020 renewables will have become the cheapest form of power generation.

A global power system fully based on renewable energy is no longer a long-term vision, but a tangible reality. Yet critics of renewable energy and fossil fuels, as well as nuclear lobbyists, often use solar and wind fluctuations as their major argument to hold on to the old system.

A new groundbreaking study by the Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) and the Energy Watch Group (EWG) refutes this argument once and for all.


The first of its kind study* simulates a global electricity system based entirely on renewable energy on an hourly basis throughout a whole year. Its results prove that the existing renewable energy potential and technologies, including storage, are able to generate sufficient and secure power supply worldwide by 2050. Under favorable political conditions, a full decarbonization and nuclear phase-out of the global electricity system can succeed even earlier than that.

The study proves that 100% renewable electricity is more cost effective than the existing system, which is largely based on fossil fuels and nuclear energy. Total levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) on a global average for 100% renewable electricity will decline to 52 €/MWh (megawatt-hour) by 2050 (including curtailment, storage and some grid costs), compared to 70 €/MWh in 2015.

Due to rapidly falling costs, solar PV and battery storage will increasingly drive most of the electricity system, with solar PV reaching some 69%, wind energy 18%, hydropower 8% and bioenergy 2% of the total electricity mix in 2050 globally.

Share of electricity generation from renewable sources in 2015 and 2050. Gas capacities in 2050 only use renewable based gas. In 2050, nuclear power still accounts for a negligible 0.3% of the total electricity generation, due to the end of its assumed technical life, but could be phased out earlier.

A 100% renewable global electricity system is also way more efficient. It can reduce global greenhouse gas emissions in the electricity sector from about 11 GtCO2eq in 2015 to ZERO emissions by 2050. The total losses in a fully renewable electricity system are significantly lower than in the current system. And the global transition to a 100% renewable electricity system will create 36 million jobs by 2050, in comparison to 19 million jobs in 2015.

Total LCOE of global power supply in 2015 and 2050.

The global energy transition scenario is carried out in five-year time periods from 2015 until 2050 and provides handy roadmaps to 100% renewable electricity for major regions of the world: Europe, Eurasia, MENA, Sub-Saharan Africa, SAARC, Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, North America and South America. These are unique roadmaps, also showing the way to fulfilling the Paris Agreement targets, signed by nearly all countries in the world.

The study shows that there is no reason to invest any single dollar in fossil fuel or nuclear power production. It also proves that energy transition is no longer a question of technical feasibility or economic viability, but of political will.



The science has proven that it is feasible.    It is now the turn of politicians, businesses and civil society to push for immediate actions, accelerating the transition.


Gaining public support is the first and most decisive prerequisite for a successful transition to renewable energy. Therefore, policy makers should adopt favourable political frameworks and instruments, promoting fast and steady growth of renewables on the one hand and phasing out all subsidies to fossil fuel and nuclear power generation on the other hand.

The German Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG) with a fixed feed-in-tariff is one of the best-known and proven successful policies. We also need to implement new, innovative political measures encouraging investment in renewable energy, storage and network integration simultaneously. A reformed version of the EEG  —  a hybrid renewable power plant remuneration  —  enables just that.

On the economic side of the energy transition, sufficient flow of private investment in renewables and storage technologies needs to be ensured for a smooth, fast, and cost-effective transition to 100% renewable energy.


Tendering procedures are most prominent nowadays when it comes to commissioning renewable power projects. Yet science also shows that tendering is reasonable only for renewable energy capacities above 40 MW. Otherwise they limit investors to large companies and exclude investment from decentralized actors, such as cooperatives. Tenders also limit the overall installations, whereas the feed-in-tariffs allow more and faster dynamics in the deployment of renewables.

Last but not least, research and education in the sphere of renewable energy and zero-emission technologies needs to be boosted. This will ensure more effective power generation in the future and new technological breakthroughs in the field of renewables.

The study is part of a larger study analyzing the entire energy system, including electricity, heat, mobility, desalination, and industrial demand. Lappeenranta University of Technology and the Energy Watch Group will publish the findings of the entire study in 2018.

*The study “Global Energy System based on 100% Renewable Energy” is co-funded by the German Federal Environmental Foundation (DBU) and the Stiftung Mercator.

Read more from The Beam.

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/02/16/100-renewable-electricity-worldwide-new-cost-effective-reality/
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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #301 on: February 17, 2018, 05:25:47 pm »
EcoWatch

Renewables 🌟 Now Contribute Nearly One-Fifth of U.S. Electricity Generation

By Lorraine Chow

Feb. 16, 2018 11:56AM EST

Renewable energy now makes up 18 percent of total electrical generation in the U.S., roughly double the amount a decade ago, a new report shows.

According to the sixth annual Sustainable Energy in America Factbook, which outlines key U.S. energy trends, renewable energy output in the power sector soared to a record high last year and could eventually rival nuclear.

The factbook, produced for the Business Council for Sustainable Energy by Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF), shows that renewable generation boomed 14 percent in 2017 to hit 717 terawatt hours (TWh). This increase was driven mostly by the West Coast's rebound in hydropower generation after years of drought as well as new wind and solar projects built in 2016 coming online in 2017.

Rachel Luo, senior analyst for U.S. utilities and market reform at BNEF and lead author of the report, told Greentech Media that 18 percent might not sound like a lot but it brings renewable energy "within striking distance" of nuclear, which contributes about 20 of total annual U.S. electricity generation.

"In 2017 it's a very significant story that renewables are making a lot of headway in pushing forward the decarbonization of the power sector, even as the natural gas share decreases," she said.

Indeed, as this chart below shows, natural gas slipped 2 percent last year, from 34 percent in 2016 to 32 percent in 2017. Coal, which used to dominate the U.S. energy landscape, has also shrunk to 30 percent.

2018 Sustainable Energy in America Factbook

Even though natural gas is still the number one producer of U.S. power, "[its] downtick could be from a variety of factors [such as] the increasing penetration of renewables, but load growth is also stalling and … natural gas prices have recovered a little," Luo told Greentech Media.

In summary, the factbook said: "The massive and historic transformation of the U.S. energy sector clicked into a higher gear in 2017, despite new policy uncertainties. Renewable deployment grew at a near-record pace, energy productivity and GDP growth both accelerated, and the U.S. became a serious player in the global liquefied natural gas market. All of this combined to squeeze U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to a 25-year low, while keeping costs in check for consumers."

Watch here to learn more:


https://www.ecowatch.com/renewable-energy-us-2535432605.html
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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #302 on: February 19, 2018, 04:56:21 pm »
Feast your eyes on the Virtual Power Plant ⚡💫 and other Renewable Energy Technoligies like Wave Power. 🌊

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #303 on: February 27, 2018, 07:19:04 pm »
EcoWatch

100+ Cities Now Powered by at Least 70% Renewables  ✨ 🎋 🎍

February 27, 2018

By Lorraine Chow

A growing list of cities and municipalities is leading a renewable energy revolution that their national governments either cannot—or will not—address.

More than 100 cities around the world now get at least 70 percent of their electricity from renewable sources such solar, wind, geothermal and hydropower, according to new research from the non-profit CDP. That's more than double the 40 cities reporting they were powered by at least 70 percent clean energy in 2015.

The list includes large cities with dense populations such as Auckland, New Zealand; Nairobi, Kenya; Oslo, Norway; Seattle, USA; and Vancouver, Canada.


Impressively, a remarkable 43 cities, including Burlington, Vermont; Reykjavik, Iceland; and Basel, Switzerland, are running on 100 percent renewables.

Burlington —Vermont's largest city, with a population of 42,000 people—became the first U.S. city to run entirely on renewable electricity back in 2015. The city gets all of its electricity from wind, solar, biomass and hydropower and even has its own utility and citywide grid.  

"We have seen first-hand that renewable energy boosts our local economy and creates a healthier place to work, live and raise a family," Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger said. "We encourage other cities around the globe to follow our innovative path as we all work toward a more sustainable energy future."

CDP, formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project, holds energy information on more than 570 of the world's cities. The research was released ahead of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change conference in Edmonton, Canada on March 5, where city governments and scientific leaders will meet on the role of cities in tackling climate change.
In the U.S., roughly 58 cities and towns, including major metropolises like Atlanta and San Diego, are rejecting fossil fuels and have announced plans to run entirely on clean energy.

And with some 275 cities now reporting the use of hydropower, 189 generating electricity from wind and 184 using solar photovoltaics, CDP expects to see more cities around the globe join this important movement.

The CDP said that much of the drive behind city climate action and reporting comes from the 7,000-plus mayors that signed up to the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy and have pledged to act on climate change.

"Cities are responsible for 70 percent of energy-related CO2 emissions and there is immense potential for them to lead on building a sustainable economy," said Kyra Appleby, director of cities at CDP.

"Reassuringly, our data shows much commitment and ambition. Cities not only want to shift to renewable energy but, most importantly—they can. We urge all cities to disclose to us, work together to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement and prioritize the development of ambitious renewable energy procurement strategies. The time to act is now."

You can find CDP's complete list below and learn more about the project here.

Akureyri, Iceland
Alba-Iulia, Romania
Alcaldía de Córdoba, Venezuela
Angra dos Reis, Brazil
Aparecida, Brazil
Aracaju, Brazil
Arendal, Norway
Aspen, USA
Assis, Brazil
Asunción, Paraguay
Auckland , New Zealand
Bærum Kommune, Norway
Bangangté, Cameroon
Basel, Switzerland
Belém, Brazil
Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Birigui, Brazil
Bogotá , Colombia
Bolzano, Italy
Braga, Portugal
Brasília, Brazil
Brotas, Brazil
Brusque, Brazil
Burlington, USA 
Cabreúva, Brazil
Cajamar, Brazil
Campinas, Brazil
Campos de Goytacazes, Brazil
Canoas, Brazil
Capivari, Brazil
Cascais, Portugal
Caxias do Sul, Brazil
Cerquilho, Brazil
Chorrera, Panama
Curitiba, Brazil
Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania
Estância Climática de São Bento do Sapucaí, Brazil
Estância Hidromineral de Águas de São Pedro, Brazil
Estância Turística de Guaratinguetá, Brazil
Estância Turística de ITU, Brazil
Eugene, USA
Extrema, Brazil
Fafe, Portugal
Fernandópolis, Brazil
Florianópolis, Brazil
Foumban, Cameroon
Gladsaxe Kommune, Denmark
Goiânia, Brazil
Harare, Zimbabwe
Hobart, Australia
Ibagué, Colombia
Inje , South Korea
Jaboatão dos Guararapes, Brazil
Kapiti Coast , New Zealand
Kisumu, Kenya
Lausanne, Switzerland
León de los Aldamas, Mexico
Limeira, Brazil
Ljubljana, Slovenia
Lorena, Brazil
Maceió, Brazil
Mairiporã, Brazil
Medellín, Colombia
Moita, Portugal
Montes Claros, Brazil
Montreal, Canada
Nairobi, Kenya
Nakuru, Kenya
Niterói, Brazil
North Vancouver, Canada
Nova Odessa, Brazil
Nyon, Switzerland
Oristano, Italy
Oslo, Norway
Palmas, Brazil
Porto, Portugal
Prince George, BC, Canada
Quelimane, Mozambique
Quito, Ecuador
Reykjavík, Iceland
Salvador, Brazil
Santiago de Cali, Colombia
Santos, Brazil
São Caetano, Brazil
São Gonçalo, Brazil
São João da Boa Vista, Brazil
São José do Rio Preto, Brazil
São José dos Campos, Brazil
Seattle, USA
Stadt Zürich, Switzerland
Stockholm, Sweden
Tatuí, Brazil
Temuco, Chile
Uberlândia, Brazil
Vancouver, Canada
Vinhedo, Brazil
Vitória, Brazil
Wellington, New Zealand
Winnipeg, Canada


https://www.ecowatch.com/renewable-energy-cities-2540308563.html
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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #304 on: April 04, 2018, 08:35:12 pm »
Climate Nexus Energy Desk

mmiceli@climatenexus.org

April 4, 2018




Connecticut’s first offshore wind farm, states & auto companies urge drivers to go electric & more

April 4, 2018: Two power companies -- one Northeastern and one Danish -- are putting together plans for what would be Connecticut’s first offshore wind farm. JinkoSolar becomes the first Chinese solar company to build a U.S. manufacturing plant since Trump’s tariffs went into effect. A $1.5 million advertising campaign between seven states and 16 automakers will encourage greater adoption of electric vehicles by focusing on their benefits. Natural gas is facing increased competition from solar and wind, which continue to drop in price.

MULTIMEDIA
Poll: Americans’ views of the environment, global warming and energy

ENERGY GANG PODCAST
Greentech Media: Trouble for Silicon Valley’s Top Car Companies



Connecticut may get its first offshore wind farm, a 200-megawatt project from Eversource Energy and Denmark’s Orsted. Known as Constitution Wind, the project would generate enough electricity to power 100,000 homes and would help Connecticut meet its clean energy goals and become a leader in offshore wind. In other offshore wind news, a recent analysis by Moody’s finds that a combination of factors including declining costs and favorable regulation will lead to rapid growth in the U.S. offshore wind market, particularly in the Northeast. (New Haven Register, New Jersey Spotlight)




Chinese solar giant JinkoSolar made the first move into U.S. manufacturing, post Trump’s solar tariffs. Jinko will invest $50 million in a partnership with NextEra Energy Resources to build up to 2.75 gigawatts of solar panels at a Jacksonville, Fla. plant over the next four years. Other companies are reportedly considering similar moves. (Greentech Media)

A $1.5 million advertising campaign will urge U.S. drivers to go electric. The campaign, known as “Drive Change. Drive Electric,” includes seven Northeastern states and 16 auto companies and will educate customers on the benefits of electric vehicles. While EV sales rose 25 percent last year, they still only account for 1.2 percent of total U.S. car sales. Domestic automakers have announced at least $19 billion in EV investments to date, and are pointing to increased driving range, lower battery costs and increased charging infrastructure as among the many incentives to make the switch. (Reuters)



The economic case for fossil fuels is rapidly decreasing as the cost of renewables continues to drop. A new report by Bloomberg New Energy Finance finds that the levelized cost of energy -- which accounts for equipment, debt servicing and operating costs -- of solar and wind will be cheaper than coal in most places by 2023. The plunge in costs of lithium-ion batteries by almost 80 percent since 2010 will increase the opportunities for energy storage over the coming years. China and India currently have the cheapest solar and wind costs.  (Bloomberg)

Natural gas is facing increased competition from low-cost solar and wind. The shift is leading some utilities to abandon natural gas plans in favor of renewables. A recent report by Lazard found that power costs from utility-scale solar are now on par with those of natural gas, and that wind power has surpassed both to become the cheapest. In states like California, which has a goal of 50 percent renewable energy by 2050, regulation is further driving this trend. In 2017, natural-gas power generation decreased by 7.7 percent. (New York Times $)



The Environmental Protection Agency has opened the door for federal fuel efficiency standards to be lowered. The agency ruled that the current greenhouse gas and fuel efficiency standards are too high, a move that could harm the production of fuel-efficient and electric vehicles by removing the need for the credits that companies receive for producing them. Honda, Toyota and Tesla all surpass the current standards and make money from selling these types of credits. (Vox)


Quote
“It’s a very different world that we’re arriving at very quickly,” energy consultant Robert McCullough said in the above New York Times story on the increasing viability of renewables over fossil fuels. “That wind farm can literally be put on a train and brought online within a year. It is moving so fast that even critics of the old path like myself have been taken by surprise.”
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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #305 on: April 05, 2018, 11:27:23 pm »
EcoWatch

Renewable Energy
 
By Olivia Rosane

Apr. 04, 2018 12:25PM EST

Mainland Portugal Generated More Renewable Energy ⚡ Than It Needed  :o in March
 

Renewable energy sources ⚡ made up 103.6 percent of mainland Portugal's electricity use this March, according to industry information released Tuesday and reported by Reuters.

Portugal has been a leader in renewable energy since before 2016, when it broke records for running on renewable sources for 107 hours straight.

March's milestone indicates how far renewable technologies and capacity have come in two years.

The report, issued by the Portuguese Renewable Energy Association and the Sustainable Earth System Association, suggested March's feat is a sign of things to come.

"Last month's achievement is an example of what will happen more frequently in the near future. It is expected that by 2040 the production of renewable electricity will be able to guarantee, in a cost-effective way, the total annual electricity consumption of mainland Portugal," the report said, according to Reuters.

Portugal did still draw power from fossil fuel plants during the month to fill in between gaps in renewable supply, but those gaps were more than made up for by moments of increased renewable production.

55 percent of March's energy came from hydropower sources and 42 percent came from wind power. The month reduced the country's carbon dioxide emissions by 1.8 million tons.

"These data, besides indicating a historical milestone in the Portuguese electricity sector, demonstrate that renewable energy can be relied upon as a secure and viable source with which to completely meet the country's electricity demands," the report said.

Portugal was an early adapter and innovator in the renewable energy sector. In 2008, it switched on what was then Europe's largest onshore wind farm while continuing to construct what was then the world's largest solar farm, The Guardian reported.

According to data published by AlterNet in 2017, Portugal runs behind other European countries when it comes to renewable energy use. It is ranked No. 12 on the continent for the amount of energy it gets from renewable sources overall: 30.50 percent. Iceland, Europe's leader, meets 76.42 percent of its energy needs with renewables.

However, March's news means that Portugal is once again inspiring its neighbors. According to EURACTIV, Green European Member of Parliament Claude Turmes of Luxembourg used the milestone to argue that the EU should increase its 2030 renewable energy goal of 27 percent.

"Impressive news from Portugal: #renewables produced more than 100% of the country's electricity consumption throughout the month of March! That shows how ridiculous a 27% target for 2030 is. Who will be the next country to follow that path?" he tweeted.

https://www.ecowatch.com/portugal-renewable-energy-wind-hydropower-2556245355.html
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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #306 on: April 06, 2018, 02:06:44 pm »
Renewables Surged Ahead of Fossil Fuels in 2017

The world invested more in renewable energy in 2017 than in all fossil fuels combined, according to a new report from the UN and Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

A record 98 GW of solar energy was installed worldwide in 2017, with China leading the way with 53 GW of solar power installed. Globally, solar also generated $160.8 billion in investments, up 18 percent from 2016, while new coal and gas projects generated only $103 billion. Renewables combined added 157 GW ⚡ worldwide  , while all fossil fuels added only 70 GW.

https://www.carbonbrief.org/global-solar-capacity-grew-faster-than-fossil-fuels-2017-report
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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #307 on: April 13, 2018, 03:18:39 pm »
Carbon Brief

TECHNOLOGY 12 April 2018  13:45

Explainer: These six metals are key to a low-carbon future🕊

SNIPPET:

The deployment of renewables and electric vehicles is expected to skyrocket as the world strives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

These low-carbon technologies currently rely on a handful of key metals, some of which have been little-used to date. This raises questions over whether enough of these materials can be mined to ensure a large-scale rollout. Others are concerned that bottlenecks could appear, as metal output rises to meet demand, or that the environmental impacts of mining could undermine carbon savings elsewhere.

Carbon Brief takes a look at some of the metals attracting most attention and examines where they come from, the quantities available and whether they could pose risks to meeting the climate targets of the Paris Agreement.

Which metals are needed for low-carbon technology?

How much of these metals will be needed?

Where do metals for low-carbon tech come from?
 
Do price rises mean the world is running short of key metals?

Could shortages hold up decarbonisation?

What problems are caused by extraction?



Full article with detailed graphics:

https://www.carbonbrief.org/explainer-these-six-metals-are-key-to-a-low-carbon-future
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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #308 on: April 27, 2018, 06:49:59 pm »



California State Senator: 100 Percent Renewable Energy is ‘Within Reach’ ✨
April 26, 2018

By John J. Berger
     
Whereas research reports by the world’s most eminent climatologists seem almost daily to bring foreboding climate news, renewable energy proponents who met at UC Berkeley in mid-April were decidedly upbeat about clean energy prospects.

The expert gathering, “Toward Electrification of All Sectors: Getting Across the Finish Line,” was all about getting to 100 percent renewable, affordable, and reliable electricity for all.

Convened by the Renewables 100 Policy Institute of Santa Monica, the day-and-a-half-long plenary was part strategy session, part victory lap, and part mustering evidence that speedily attaining 100 percent renewable power is feasible and practical.

Ken Alex, the governor’s senior policy advisor, began the meeting on a somber note by telling the audience that we will likely lose the late-summer Arctic sea ice cover by 2050.

Loss of the ice darkens the surface of the Arctic, increasing the absorption of heat and amplifying global heating. New unpublished research, Alex said, indicates that Arctic sea ice loss will have a substantially more powerful heating effect on the Earth than generally realized.

Supporters of clean energy were nonetheless buoyed by the rapid technological progress and steep price drops in renewable energy and electric vehicles. Both utility-scale wind and solar power have now become cheaper than coal and some natural gas power plants. More new wind and solar utility generation is now being built in the U.S. than fossil-fueled plants.

Related: Wind, Solar Provide 98 Percent of New US Generating Capacity in Jan/Feb

In a keynote to the gathering, California State Sen. Kevin de Léon, until recently the Senate President pro tempore, shared his reasons for optimism about the transition to renewable energy.

Because the state’s environmental and energy policies have turned environmental challenges into economic opportunities, he said, Californians now enjoy cleaner air, healthier water, and billions of dollars in savings on energy bills, keeping “Californians’ energy spending among the lowest in the nation.”

Since the state’s cap-and-trade carbon bill, AB 32 passed in 2006, de Léon noted, the state’s per capita GDP “has grown by nearly twice the national average—and we’ve easily outpaced the nation in job creation.”

De Léon singled out the state’s decades long record of passing the nation’s toughest vehicle emission standards, coastal protections, and energy efficiency standards, along with some of the country’s most ambitious clean energy goals.

At the forefront of these efforts, de Léon last year introduced Senate Bill 100 which would require California to get 100 percent of its power from renewable sources by 2045. SB 100 is currently in the Assembly Utilities and Energy Committee awaiting a vote.

“All the evidence suggests 100 percent clean energy is within reach,” de Léon declared.

Whereas California is currently committed under SB 350 (also by de Léon) to getting 50 percent of its power from renewables by 2030, SB 100 would raise the 2030 requirement to 60 percent. It would, however, count existing hydropower toward the 100 percent goal. Since the state’s power mix was 15 percent hydro in 2016, by 2030 the state could already be getting at least 75 percent of its power from renewable and zero-carbon sources.

In addition, if carbon capture and sequestration could be done “in a way that is affordable and truly clean,” de Léon said, “that would count under this bill.”

Under Senate Bill 350, California in 2015 raised its 2030 renewable electricity goal to 50 percent. The state’s prior goal had been 33 percent renewables by 2020. California’s major utilities are already close to or above 40 percent renewable power and will soon be at 50 percent.

The bill also calls for a 50 percent increase in energy efficiency in existing buildings and seeks to accelerate the electrification of the state’s transportation sector.

Representative Chris Lee of Hawaii told the conference that Hawaii, now at 30 percent renewable power, has committed to 100 percent renewables and to phase out fossil fuel power in ground transportation by 2045.

Lee said that while the state is committed to 100 percent renewables by 2045, it will achieve it by 2040—and at a savings of $5 billion, which is 8 percent of Hawaii’s GDP.

“Saving the climate is to preserve our way of life,” he stated. “It is for our survival..These problems are soluble,” he added. “Having the vision of getting to 100 percent renewable energy is what we need.”

Like Hawaii, San Francisco has committed to getting 100 percent of its power from renewables by 2045. More than 50 other U.S. cities are also committed to 100 percent renewable power.

Much to the delight of renewable energy advocates, since electric vehicles can be powered by clean electricity, Gov. Brown on January 26, 2018 issued an executive order raising the state’s 2030 target from 1.5 million zero emission vehicles to 5 million. The order will also boost the supply of charging and refueling stations for zero-emission vehicles, and it calls for the investment of $1.25 billion in cap-and-trade auction revenues in combatting carbon pollution from cars and trucks.

Assemblyman Phil Ting of San Francisco told conferees, “If you want clean air, you absolutely have to have clean cars.”    According to the Governor’s Office, fifty percent of California’s greenhouse gases currently come from the transportation sector along with 80 percent of its smog-forming gases. Ting is sponsoring a bill in the Assembly to ban internal combustion engines in California by 2040.

China, France, the U.K., India, and Norway have announced similar or earlier deadlines for phasing out internal combustion engines.

California already has almost 400,000 electric vehicles, and many jurisdictions are converting diesel bus lines to electric buses. Ryan Popple, president and CEO of electric bus company Proterra, told the conference that business is booming and the technology is improving rapidly, with battery electric buses now capable of eliminating their fossil-fueled competitors. 


Electric buses produced by 2020 will have a 225-mile range, he said, while most transit bus routes require less than 130 miles of travel per day. With electric drivelines now already cheaper than diesels, diesel and compressed natural gas bus market shares “are going to go to zero,” he predicted.

De Léon’s closing remarks were an outspoken rebuke to President Trump 🦀.

“If the President really wants to put people to work and make America the world’s energy super power, he should follow our lead…We didn’t grow into the world’s sixth largest economy and the epicenter of innovation by embracing ‘alternative facts,’ or pseudo-scientific nonsense.”

https://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2018/04/california-state-senator-100-percent-renewable-energy-is-within-reach.html
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Global renewable jobs reach record high, wind farms are boosting local taxes, India installed more renewables than coal and more.

May 9, 2018: U.S. solar and wind companies are increasingly supporting Republican candidates, and vice versa. Global renewable energy jobs hit an all-time high of 10.3 million last year. Wind farms are boosting local tax bases across the U.S., in some areas by as much as 30 percent. Universities that have long offered fossil-fuel related degrees are now offering diplomas in solar and wind amid growing demand. India installed more renewable energy capacity than coal last year for the first time.



Quote
Renewable energy has become a pillar of low-carbon economic growth for governments all over the world...” said Adnan Z. Amin, director-general of the International Renewable Energy Agency, on the growth of renewable energy jobs as detailed in their latest report.



In a first, India installed more renewable energy capacity than coal last year. The country added almost 11,800 megawatts of renewables, more than double the amount of other fuels. The largest additions came from ground-mounted solar and wind, although these have not met national targets. While accounting for a smaller amount overall, rooftop solar, biomass, small hydro and waste-to-energy have surpassed target capacity additions. The government is aiming for 175,000 megawatts of added renewable power by 2022. (Quartz)



Wind farms are giving a boost to local tax bases in the U.S., generating new revenue for needed capital expenditures. Almost half of total installed wind capacity is located in Texas, Iowa, Oklahoma and California. In one county in Iowa, the tax base grew nearly 30 percent due to new wind projects. Tech companies such as Apple and Facebook invested almost $10 billion in data centers in the state due to the abundance of wind power. Government incentives, clean energy requirements and strength of wind power all play a role in where wind gets built. (Reuters)

An increasing number of U.S. universities that offer fossil-fuels related degrees are now offering diplomas in wind and solar technology. Although the starting salary for clean energy jobs may not be as high as those in oil and gas, many students are opting for the renewable energy jobs because of the opportunities the growing field offers. While need for workers in the oil and gas industry decreases with automation, the renewable energy industry needs skilled workers now, and educators expect that these programs will increase in size as renewables become increasingly competitive with fossil fuels. (Wall Street Journal $)



Domestic solar and wind energy companies have donated more money to Republicans than to Democrats in congressional races for the current election cycle. These industries are becoming more mainstream and receiving increasing Republican support as their economic benefits are realized. Solar and wind employ about 300,000 people across the country, almost six times more than coal mining. Polling shows that support for clean energy is widespread among voters. (Reuters)

Global renewable energy employment hit an all-time high of 10.3 million last year, according to a new report by IRENA. The total represents a 5.3 percent increase over 2016, with over 500,000 new jobs created. The solar industry accounted for the highest number overall, largely driven by China. Altogether, China, Brazil, the U.S., India, Germany and Japan accounted for 70 percent of the world’s renewable energy jobs. (CNBC)

An increasing number of Americans say their next car will be electric, according to AAA. Twenty percent of Americans now see themselves purchasing an EV when the time comes, a five percent increase from 2017. This is partially attributable to less concern about running out of battery power while driving, a fear that AAA finds to be largely unfounded. Lower maintenance costs for electric vehicles and increasing gas prices have also fueled this upward trend. While the vehicles still have higher upfront prices, credits can help offset the cost and the EV market is growing every year. (USA Today)



The dissolution of Suniva continues as the company received approval to auction off its parts. Equipment controlled by both SQN Capital Management and Suniva Wanxiang America Corp. will be sold, although there doesn’t appear to be eager buyers for the equipment.. Suniva was one of two solar companies to petition the Trump administration to place a tariff on imported solar products, but the tariffs did not help revive the company. (Greentech Media)

https://mailchi.mp/climatenexus/global-renewable-jobs-reach-record-high-wind-farms-are-boosting-local-tax-bases-india-installed-more-renewables-than-coal-and-more
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GLOBAL CITIZEN

May 10, 2018

Costa Rica's New President Just Banned Fossil Fuels

By Joe McCarthy  and  Erica Sanchez

Quote
"We have the titanic and beautiful task of abolishing the use of fossil fuels.”

SNIPPET:

Costa Rica’s new president Carlos Alvarado announced a ban on fossil fuels Wednesday, establishing the small country as a major trailblazer in the global fight against climate change, according to Telesur TV.

More than 2,000 people crowded the Plaza de la Democracy in the capital San Jose to witness the historic announcement. Alvarado, who officially took office Tuesday, underlined his commitment by arriving in a hydrogen-powered bus.

"Decarbonization is the great task of our generation and Costa Rica must be one of the first countries in the world to accomplish it, if not the first," Alvarado said during the event.

"We have the titanic and beautiful task of abolishing the use of fossil fuels in our economy to make way for the use of clean and renewable energies,” he added.

Full article:

https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/costa-ricas-new-president-banned-fossil-fuels/
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CleanTechnica
Support CleanTechnica’s work via donations on Patreon or PayPal!

Or just go buy a cool t-shirt, cup, baby outfit, bag, or hoodie.


Costa Rica: 1st Country To Achieve Independence From Fossil Fuels?

May 13th, 2018 by Steve Hanley


City in Costa Rica image via The Real Deal Tours

Costa Rica, nestled between Nicaragua to the north and Panama to the south, is making plans to be entirely free of fossil fuels in the very near future. New President Carlos Alvarado, age 38, told a cheering crowd at his inauguration last week, “Decarbonization is the great task of our generation and Costa Rica must be one of the first countries in the world to accomplish it, if not the first. We have the titanic and beautiful task of abolishing the use of fossil fuels in our economy to make way for the use of clean and renewable energies.”


Geothermal plant in Costa Rica

Costa Rica has made impressive strides in its campaign to rely strictly on renewable energy for its electricity. In 2017, it had 300 days in which renewables met its entire demand for electricity. It is at the forefront of geothermal energy and has taken a leading role in the world community when it comes to banning plastics.

Yet it suffers from the same curse as every other nation in the world — too damn many automobiles. On a percentage basis, Costa Rica’s new car market is growing faster than China’s, at about 25% a year, and the streets of its capitol city, San José, are choked with traffic that seems to grow worse by the day. As a result, while carbon emissions from electricity generation are falling, emissions from internal combustion engines are soaring.

Less than 2% of the cars in Costa Rica are electrics and hybrids. Last year, demand for gasoline was up 11% according to The Guardian. But president Alvarado has a plan to deal with the curse of fossil fuel powered cars. During his campaign, he announced a goal of ending fossil fuel usage by 2021. “When we reach 200 years of independent life, we will take Costa Rica forward and celebrate … that we’ve removed gasoline and diesel from our transportation,” he promised, according to a report in The Independent.


While that goal is laudable, it will be hard to reach, says José Daniel Lara, a Costa Rican energy researcher at the University of California-Berkeley who claims completely eliminating fossil fuels within just a few years is probably unrealistic, even though the plan will lay the groundwork for faster action towards that goal. “It must be seen by its rhetoric value and not by its technical precision,” Mr Lara said.


Bill McKibben

@billmckibben
 Costa Rica, which has no army, now plans to get off fossil fuel entirely in the next few years. This is what leadership looks like. https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/costa-rica-fossil-fuels-ban-president-carlos-alvarado-climate-change-global-warming-a8344541.html?amp

3:59 AM - May 12, 2018
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Regular CleanTechnica collaborator Monica Araya, who is an economist and director of Costa Rica Limpia, says her country’s plan to wean itself off of fossil fuels in all sectors, including transportation, sends a powerful message to the world. As most of the world’s developed countries dodge and weave around the subject of fossil fuels and their impact on the COP21 agreements they all agreed to, Costa Rica is holding up a mirror and saying, “Look. If we can do this, so can you!”

View image on TwitterView image on Twitter

Monica Araya
@MonicaArayaTica
 #Podcast by @Monocle24 talks about #CostaRica's vision to move beyond #fossilfuels. Here's a brief interview I did.  Our (new) President's decision is an idea whose time has come. It was several years in the making. It is hard but doable! (Last 6-7 min)https://monocle.com/radio/shows/the-globalist/1705/ …

9:10 AM - May 12, 2018
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Araya is also a champion of the C40 Cities program, whose mission is to change the world, one city block at a time. Cities have been leaders of climate action in recent years, and Milan is now taking a leadership role by looking at a similar target to Costa Rica’s.


C40 Cities

@c40cities
 #Milan will have a zero-emission historical city centre by 2030, banning all fossil fuel vehicles from the city centre by 2029. By signing the C40 Fossil-Fuel-Free Streets Declaration, the pioneering city pledged to ensure that a major area of their city is zero emission by 2030.

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Is there any guarantee that Costa Rica will succeed in banning fossil fuels by 2021? No, there is not. But establishing such a goal is an important step in moving Costa Rica and the world toward a future in which carbon emissions no longer threaten to destroy the world and all living things who depend on it for survival. If Costa Rica misses its goal by a few years or even a decade, at least it will be helping change people’s minds about fossil fuels. Attitudes change slowly, but as the Chinese saying goes, “A journey of a thousand miles begins with but a single step.”

Related: Busting Electric Car Myths In Costa Rica & Globally (CleanTechnica Video)


https://cleantechnica.com/2018/05/13/costa-rica-1st-country-to-achieve-independence-from-fossil-fuels/
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May 15, 2018

INT'L RENEWABLES: Almost half of Australian big business moving to renewables (The Guardian), why a 100-year-old Indian company is investing billions into renewable energy (Quartz), solar power could save water in thirsty Middle East, North Africa, analysis says (Thomson Reuters Foundation), almost half of Australian big business moving to renewables (The Guardian), German offshore wind pioneer said to plan $1 billion stake sale (Bloomberg)

OIL & GAS: Arctic oil 'undrillable' amid global warming: U.N.'s ex-climate chief (Reuters), Statoil to become Equinor, dropping 'oil' to attract young talent (Reuters), Shell spreads its bets around as it prepares for a greener future (New York Times $), linguistic analysis shows oil companies are giving up on climate change (Quartz), Powder River Basin sees 10,000 permit drilling battle (AP), Shell faces shareholder outcry over incident that killed 200 (Bloomberg), investors urge fossil fuel firms to shun Trump's Arctic drilling plans (The Guardian)
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May 18, 2018

#Energiewende #Renewables

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

100-percent renewable German energy system possible – study

Powering a large country like Germany entirely with renewable energy is possible, and could even be cheaper than conventional energy sources, according to a study by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).

Technical solutions for all of the well-known problems that come with “a full energy transition” already exist, says co-author and physicist Tom Brown in a KIT press release.

Blackouts are not a problem either, Brown says, as renewables could be used to create hydrogen or methane gas reserves stored for emergencies or times of low output from wind and solar power plants.   

Find the study in English here.

https://www.cleanenergywire.org/news/reactions-eu-air-quality-lawsuit-100-renewables-possible-study
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Agelbert NOTE: This article answers the question that has ALWAYS been in the category of "Do wild bears poop in the woods".



Can we get 100% of our energy from renewable sources? 

By Michelle Froese | May 18, 2018

This article comes from Science Daily, with materials provided by Lappeenranta University of Technology.


Scientists have demonstrated that there are no roadblocks on the way to a 100% renewable future.

֍ Is there enough space for all the wind turbines and solar panels to provide all our energy needs?

֍ What happens when the sun doesn’t shine and the wind doesn’t blow? 🤔

֍ Won’t renewables destabilize the grid and cause blackouts?    

In a review paper last year in the high-ranking journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Master of Science Benjamin Heard 🐉 and colleagues 🦕 🦖 presented their case  against 100% renewable electricity systems. They doubted the feasibility of many of the recent scenarios for high shares of renewable energy, questioning everything from whether renewables-based systems can survive extreme weather events with low sun and low wind, to the ability to keep the grid stable with so much variable generation.

Now scientists have hit back with their response to the points raised by Heard and colleagues. The researchers from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Delft University of Technology and Aalborg University have analysed hundreds of studies from across the scientific literature to answer each of the apparent issues.

They demonstrate that there are no roadblocks on the way to a 100% renewable future.

“While several of the issues raised by the Heard paper are important, you have to realise that there are technical solutions to all the points they raised, using today’s technology,” says the lead author of the response, Dr. Tom Brown of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology.

Quote
“Furthermore, these solutions are absolutely affordable, especially given the sinking costs of wind and solar power,” adds Professor Christian Breyer of Lappeenranta University of Technology, who co-authored the response.

Brown cites the worst-case solution of hydrogen or synthetic gas produced with renewable electricity for times when imports, hydroelectricity, batteries, and other storage fail to bridge the gap during low wind and solar periods during the winter. For maintaining stability there is a series of technical solutions, from rotating grid stabilisers to newer electronics-based solutions. The scientists have collected examples of best practice by grid operators from across the world, from Denmark to Tasmania.

Furthermore, these solutions are absolutely affordable, especially given the sinking costs of wind and solar power.

The response by the scientists has now appeared in the same journal as the original article by Heard and colleagues.

There are some persistent myths that 100% renewable systems are not possible,” says Professor Brian Vad Mathiesen of Aalborg University, who is a co-author of the response. “Our contribution deals with these myths one-by-one, using all the latest research. Now let’s get back to the business of modeling low-cost scenarios to eliminate fossil fuels from our energy system, so we can tackle the climate and health challenges they pose.”   


https://www.windpowerengineering.com/business-news-projects/can-we-get-100-of-our-energy-from-renewable-sources/


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