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Author Topic: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth  (Read 9814 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #330 on: August 09, 2018, 09:09:32 pm »


Renewables reach 1 trillion ⚡ watts, corporations purchase record levels of clean energy, auto suppliers see money in EVs ⚡ and more

SNIPPET:

August 8, 2018: Giant wind and solar projects are powering energy-intensive mining operations in Chile’s Atacama Desert. Wind and solar installations have reached one trillion watts, drawing in $2.3 trillion in investment over the last 40 years. Corporate purchasing of clean energy so far this year has reached 7.2 gigawatts, surpassing the record set in 2017. Auto suppliers are adapting their efforts to take advantage of the rise of electric vehicles.

Quote
"Hitting one terrawatt is a tremendous achievement for the wind and solar industries, but as far as we’re concerned, it’s just the start," said Albert Cheung, BloombergNEF’s head of analysis in London on the two industries reaching one trillion watts this year.

Read more:

https://mailchi.mp/climatenexus/renewables-reach-1-trillion-watts-corporations-purchase-record-levels-of-clean-energy-auto-suppliers-see-money-in-evs-and-more

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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #331 on: August 15, 2018, 05:31:39 pm »


August 15, 2018



Investment in residential solar companies took off this year, as Trump’s tariffs drive Wall Street to be more discerning with their money. While solar panel manufacturers struggle with the impact of the solar tariffs, rooftop developers such as Sunrun and Vivint Solar are faring much better as investors take the time to understand the differences among companies in the maturing industry. Contributing to the rooftop solar investment boost are state-level policies such as California’s recent mandate that all new homes include solar panels by 2020, as well as the extension of federal tax incentives. (Bloomberg)


The Midwest is a hotbed for clean energy, adding nearly 4,000 new jobs across the sector last year, according to a new analysis. While total U.S. clean energy jobs stalled, the Midwest saw five percent growth and now employs over 714,000 people in the sector — four times as many as fossil fuels. Michigan, Illinois and Ohio ranked in the top 10 nationwide for clean energy jobs, with more than 100,000 in each state. Nearly 12 percent of Midwesterners employed in the sector are veterans. (North American Windpower)




Midwest utilities are phasing out coal and investing in more wind and solar. State-mandated renewable portfolio standards are helping drive the trend, but an increasing number of utilities are setting voluntary emissions reduction targets. This month Wisconsin’s two largest public utilities raised their emissions reduction goals from 40 to 80 percent below 2005 levels by mid-century, and plan to meet the goal with more investment in renewables and natural gas. Despite these advancements, environmental advocates across the Midwest argue that utilities need to wean off of coal much sooner. (Greentech Media)



Up to 40 million EV ⚡ charging points will be installed worldwide by 2030, according to a new forecast from GTM research. The report estimates that 11 percent of new vehicle sales will be electric by then. In the U.S., California’s favorable state policies have been driving investment in charging infrastructure and helped create a network that extends up to Canada. Buildout has been slower on the East Coast, but progress is ramping up. Last week Virginia announced it will work with EVgo to build a network of charging stations across the state, using $14 million from Volkswagen settlement funds. (Greentech Media)
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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #332 on: August 29, 2018, 10:58:16 am »
 
Make Nexus Hot News part of your morning: click here to subscribe.

August 29, 2018

California Assembly Passes 100 Percent Renewables Mandate

California lawmakers have voted to mandate that 100 percent of the state's electricity come from renewable sources by 2045. The aggressive new bill passed by the State Assembly Tuesday also requires utilities to get half of their energy from renewables by 2026, four years ahead of the current schedule.

If passed by Gov. Jerry Brown as expected, California would join Hawaii, the first state to pass an all-renewables mandate, and lawmakers say it could help influence Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York and DC, which are all currently considering similar mandates. "We have to be a leader. We have to show what can be done," said Assemblyman Bill Quirk told the AP. "If we can get to 100 percent renewables, others will as well."

https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article217397360.html
« Last Edit: August 29, 2018, 05:31:56 pm by AGelbert »
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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #333 on: September 11, 2018, 06:48:32 pm »
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California Governor Brown Signs Law Requiring 100% Clean Energy By 2045 😀

September 11th, 2018 by Joshua S Hill

California Governor Edmund “Jerry” Brown on Monday signed Senate Bill 100 into law, setting in place a 100% renewable electricity target for the state by 2045, and doubled down on his clean energy commitment by issuing an executive order establishing a new target to achieve carbon neutrality over the same time frame.

Less than a fortnight after the California State Assembly passed Senate Bill 100 (SB-100) by a margin of 43 to 32, the State’s Governor has signed the bill into law, confirming the words of the bill’s author, State Senator Kevin de León, last month: “When it comes to fighting climate change and reducing our reliance on fossil fuels, California won’t back down.”

Given his past history in advocating for renewable energy and environmental policies, it is unsurprising Governor Brown acted so quickly in signing this bill into law. “This bill and the executive order put California on a path to meet the goals of Paris and beyond. It will not be easy. It will not be immediate. But it must be done,” said Governor Brown.

“In California, Democrats and Republicans know climate change is real, it’s affecting our lives right now, and unless we take action immediately – it may become irreversible,” added Senator de León on Monday. “Today, with Governor Brown’s support, California sent a message to the rest of the world that we are taking the future into our own hands; refusing to be the victims of its uncertainty. Transitioning to an entirely carbon-free energy grid will create good-paying jobs, ensure our children breathe cleaner air and mitigate the devastating impacts of climate change on our communities and economy.”

Specifically, SB-100 serves to advance California’s existing Renewables Portfolio Standard and increases the state’s targets to 50% by 2025, 60% by 2030, and 100% by 2045.

“California is committed to doing whatever is necessary to meet the existential threat of climate change,” said Governor Brown in his SB 100 signing message. “This bill, and others I will sign this week, help us go in that direction. But have no illusions, California and the rest of the world have miles to go before we achieve zero-carbon emissions.”

In addition to signing SB-100 into law, Governor Brown also issued an executive order directing the state to achieve carbon neutrality by 2045 and net negative greenhouse gas emissions after that.

“These actions are both visionary and pragmatic, and further cement California’s position as a national and global leader on climate change,” said Dan Lashof, Director, World Resources Institute for the United States. “Planning needs to start now to allow a smooth transition to a 100% clean electricity system, avoiding stranded investments and driving better outcomes for families and businesses across California. In addition, the legislation includes mandatory interim targets that will drive continued expansion of the renewable energy industry in the near term, which already employs more than 150,000 Californians. Governor Brown also upped the ante by setting a new statewide target to achieve zero net emissions by 2045. This is a great way to kick off the Global Climate Action Summit.”

“We applaud the governor for his support to make a 100% clean energy grid a reality for our great state, and demonstrating California’s global leadership for a secure, clean, affordable energy future,” said Amisha Rai, Senior Director of California Policy for the Advanced Energy Economy (AEE). “This clean energy bill is also a big win for our economy and jobs, as we have already demonstrated here in California that we can improve our energy resources while making a positive economic impact.”

“Good organizing pays off!” crowed Bill McKibben, co-founder of 350.org. “So much credit is due to community groups around California that turned the fires and droughts and floods into fuel for significant climate action. While some are talking about climate solutions and green jobs, California leaders like Senator Kevin de León are making solutions real.”

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/09/11/california-governor-brown-signs-law-requiring-100-clean-energy-by-2045/
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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #334 on: September 18, 2018, 04:28:22 pm »

Fossil Fuels Divestment Reaches $6.24 Trillion

September 18, 2018

Fossil fuel companies own our governments, so the number one goal of the movement is to weaken their grip and and then to expose the failed business model of the industry.  We want them to re-direct investments to renewables, says Ellen Dorsey, Executive Director of the Wallace Global Fund


Story Transcript

SHARMINI PERIES: It’s The Real News Network. I’m Sharmini Peries, coming to you from Baltimore.

Fossil fuel divestment has become a global phenomenon. This week, the Global Fossil Fuel Divestment Movement released a new report showcasing an incredible growth in scale and impact of the movement. According to this report, close to 1000 institutional investors with $6.24 trillion in assets have committed to divest from fossil fuels. This is up from $52 billion just four years ago.

This week we have been covering the protests of the environmental activists and the California Governor Jerry Brown’s Global Climate Action Summit. The protesters that are on the streets are demanding that their leaders play their role in accelerating policy efforts to curb global warming. To discuss all of this with me today is Ellen Dorsey. She is at the summit, and she’s joining us from San Francisco.

Ellen Dorsey is the executive director of the Wallace Global Fund, a private foundation focused on progressive social change in the field of the environment, democracy, human rights, and corporate accountability. Ellen Dorsey was awarded the 2016 inaugural Nelson Mandela and Graca Machel’s Brave Philanthropy Award. Ellen, I thank you so much for joining us.

ELLEN DORSEY: Thank you, Sharmini, for having me.

SHARMINI PERIES: Ellen, now, obviously you are celebrating the monumental achievements of the movement and the successes the divestment movement has had. And of course your role has been very important in all of this. So highlight for us the achievements of the movement, and what is actually logged in that report.

ELLEN DORSEY: Sure. So just this week movement leaders released a global state of the divestment movement report, announced new commitments by investors to move their assets out of fossil fuels as an ethical, financial, and fiduciary imperative, and into climate solutions, as well- investing as well as divesting- and issued a call to action to be carried out through the proceedings of the Global Climate Action Summit.

In short, four years ago we held the first press conference in September of 2014. And at that time it marked that there were $52 billion in assets under management that had already divested from fossil fuels as a result of advocacy begun by students just three years earlier. And now, four years later, this week we announced that nearly a thousand institutional investors have committed to divest from fossil fuels with $6.24 trillion in assets under management. That’s a nearly 12,000 percent increase from that first announcement.

SHARMINI PERIES: All right. Now, Ellen, you’re not talking about just divesting. You’re also talking about investing in good things. Tell us about that part of the report.

ELLEN DORSEY: Not all institutions that have committed to divest have made explicit commitments to investment, but many have. For instance, my sector, philanthropy, we organize something called Divest Invest Philanthropy. We now have over 175 foundations that have committed to divest from all fossil fuels and invest 5 percent of our investment portfolios in climate solutions, including what I think is very important, is investing in universal energy access to make sure that the billion-plus without electricity today are included in the energy transition and are reached with safe, clean, and affordable energy, and also to invest in the just transition. We should be putting our capital into extractive communities, and to support dislocated extractive workers.

On the call to action, the call to action that we released on Monday included a call for all investors to be putting 5 percent of their investments into climate solutions to rapidly scale renewables, which we must do to be able to reach that 2 degrees Celsius limit of warming. We also have to invest in the solutions, as well as divest from the problem.

SHARMINI PERIES: All right, Ellen, you were talking about universities and students engaged in this movement, which has been a critical part. Give us a sense of how this movement grew; how it started, and how it grew.

ELLEN DORSEY: Yeah, it’s a great story. In 2011, the first group of students working on fossil fuel divestment emerged at Swarthmore University. In the summer of 2011, students from about eight campuses, along with four or five environmental organizations, came together to plan campaigns on college campuses. Started with 8, grew to 40. In the interim, an organization called Carbon Tracker released its analysis about the impending carbon bomb, the kind of stranded asset risk analysis, and the idea that just like there was a tech bubble, there would be a carbon bubble.

And so Bill McKibben brilliantly linked these divestment campaigns with this new analysis by Carbon Tracker, and released an article called Do the Math in Rolling Stone. It lit a match. 40 campuses went to 400 overnight. And then the movement started spreading to faith, to cities, to pension funds, to philanthropy, my sector, health groups, hospitals, and now it’s reached the financial mainstream. Large-scale insurers, large-scale pension funds have all been committing to divest. Some for ethical reasons, some for ethical and financial reasons, some for purely financial reasons and to uphold their fiduciary duty. So it’s exploded, grown like wildfire around the world.

SHARMINI PERIES: Ellen, speaking of the global effect. Now, various city mayors and governors like Governor Brown has taken this issue up. Now Mayor of New York Bill de Blasio and London Mayor Sadiq Khan just published an op-ed in The Guardian calling on all cities to divest from fossil fuels. This is incredible, it’s having a domino effect all over the world, which is wonderful. Tell us more about it.

ELLEN DORSEY: It’s unbelievably exciting to watch. You know, I’ve been an activist for many decades. Hate to say how many. And I consider myself a little bit of a student of social movements. And this movement is now a fully- a full-blown global social movement. It’s hydra-headed. It’s not coordinated by any one institution. It’s made up of individuals that have called upon institutions that they have a relationship with, a university, their faith group, their pension fund, their retirement accounts, and advocated for those, you know, institutional investors to divest from fossil fuels. And it’s exploded globally. It’s in many countries in the world, North and South.

And what’s been fascinating is now to see how cities and governments are grabbing on as a result of advocacy and grassroots pressure, not doing this just on their own, or now committing to divest. The government of Ireland has committed to divest its national fund. And now the mayors of London and New York both committing to divest and invest are launching a new forum, a Divest Invest Cities forum, calling on mayors all over the world to join them to move their assets out of fossil fuels and invest in the clean energy economy that will produce jobs in their cities, in their- in their boroughs, and et cetera. So it has exploded. It’s like, just wildfire.

SHARMINI PERIES: All right, Ellen, here are some challenges that the movement is facing. Some progressive economists at the Political Economy Research Institute, PERI, which is a progressive-oriented research house at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, published a study in April that concluded that fossil fuel divestment campaigns have not been that effective at significantly reducing CO2 emissions, and that they are not likely to become more effective over time. Now, it also found that divestment does not have a major impact on stock market prices of fossil fuel companies. What is your response to that?

ELLEN DORSEY: Well, I’m open minded and respect different opinions and different ways of analyzing the problem. First I would say that this movement has a kind of complex theory of change, if you’ll let me break apart a bit.

First and foremost, it’s build- the purpose of the fossil fuel divestment movement initially was to build a global climate movement. Prior to the early days of divestment there was not a climate movement. There were pockets of advocacy around the world, but we didn’t have a people’s movement, nor did we have a global people’s movement. So calling for divestment and calling for institutions to divest their assets from fossil fuels is something of a tactic that any activists in any part of the world could do. And so it was first and foremost a way to build power and to focus on the problem.

Prior to the call for divestment, all of the activists around the world and environmental advocates in general were calling for policy change. The problem is that the fossil fuel industry owned governments, and prevented action on policy. So the number one goal of the movement was to take away the social license of the industry to operate, and to weaken its grip over the political process. And I think that is absolutely essential first and foremost, and it is starting to do that.

Secondly, it’s about exposing the failed business model of the fossil fuel industry. You know, really pulling back the black curtain on what the industry, on the worms inside, as it were, and the problems with the industry so that investors would begin to withdraw their capital.

And then third, it’s about capitalizing the solutions. We can’t actually get off of fossil fuels unless we grow the alternatives. And by growing the alternatives and making renewables cost competitive, that is hurting the the bottom line of the industry. And the industry is starting to hurt as a result of this. In fact, even Shell Oil in their annual report cited the divestment movement as a material risk to its investors. Now, to me that tells you that they know that this is threatening them, threatening their core business model. And as well it is threatening their grip over the political process, which will enable us to regulate that carbon, which is the thing that will bring the emissions down fastest.

So a complicated answer to that question, but I’m not surprised that we don’t see dramatic reductions in emissions right now, because we’re building a longer-term movement against the most powerful industry in the world.

SHARMINI PERIES: Ellen, now, the researchers recommended that the environmental activists, instead of directing their energy into divestment, should instead direct their efforts to drive down fossil fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. So what do you make of that?

ELLEN DORSEY: Well, first of all, divestment is not the only thing that’s going to get us to what we need. So absolutely, we should be driving down consumption. I don’t disagree with that at all. But reducing consumption is not going to change the problem, the core problem, that at this point the industry has been so powerful it has worked against regulation of carbon. And so we have to do- we have to drive down consumption where we can. We have to embolden politicians to take regulatory action. But we as individuals can use the lever of finance as a people’s lever of social change, and all those factors together will work hand in hand to help us transition off the dependence on the fossil fuels and into a clean energy economy.

That, too, is going to have its own challenges. We need to fight to make sure that the renewable industry isn’t creating environmental harms and human rights violations, as well. So you know, we’re always in struggle for a better world. But this struggle right now to get off of fossil fuels is absolutely urgent, and we have very very little time to waste.

SHARMINI PERIES: Ellen, you are in this unique position of being able to go to the protest, walk the streets with civil society actors and activists, and be a part of the movement, but you also spoke yesterday at the summit, and you also have access to the decisionmakers, the policymakers, those who are all positioned to make a real difference by way of policy and adopting good comprehensive plans for the world. But you are also up against corporations in these sites of, you know, talking about these very important issues for the world. How do you navigate all of that?

ELLEN DORSEY: Yeah, it’s a good question. And I would say that I was extremely pleased to be out in the streets, in the protest, in the marches. Many of the organizations that my foundations support were out in the streets. And they’re calling for both more rapid action, more authentic action, and climate action that respects those most at risk. And to ensure that the people who are in the streets are actually in the suites, as well. That you know, consultation with Indigenous groups and frontline EJ groups, et cetera. So I was proud to be part of that march.

And in turn, when you go into the meeting, I feel it’s a personal responsibility to bring those messages into the discussion in every way that I can, whether it’s in participating in forums, or in my own, you know, remarks about climate finance, and that we need to be thinking about not just getting awful fossil fuels, but we need to be investing in the just transition and we need to struggle over the questions of who will own the clean energy economy of the future? Who are the beneficiaries? And how do we do things better that respect human rights and the environment as we’re structuring basically the underpinnings of the global economy, our energy. We’re structuring a new global economy with this transition off of fossil fuels, and so much is at stake.

So it’s important to bring the leverage of the street and the organizing and the activists into those discussions, and also to speak truth to power when the corporations are sitting in the room with you, and the government officials that are slow walking this transition. It’s important to speak with authenticity and, and often courage.

SHARMINI PERIES: And Ellen Dorsey, thank you for doing that on our behalf and on behalf of humanity. I thank you so much for joining us today.

ELLEN DORSEY: Thank you.

SHARMINI PERIES: And thank you for joining us here on The Real News Network.

https://therealnews.com/stories/fossil-fuels-divestment-reaches-6-24-trillion
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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #335 on: October 02, 2018, 11:38:01 am »


The Key To A Successful Energy Transition

October 1st, 2018 by The Beam

SNIPPET:

We experienced three major development phases:

In phase 1, renewables played a niche role in our grids, below 10% of total consumption. To some extent we could just ignore the renewables — they integrated themselves. We still had to speed along a fast learning curve, since weather forecast instruments had to be developed and the company had to manage all billing and accounting data from new energy sources. But overall, it wasn’t very important whether or not some mistakes occurred because the overall amount of renewables in our electricity system was still comparatively small.

In phase 2, renewables became a major component of our electricity system. We moved up to 40% of the yearly consumption covered by renewables. We had in this second stage to review all our system control processes, to develop tailor-made and more accurate weather forecasts. We were faced with changing regulations, process changes to act closer to real-time and to start steering renewables infeed. We intensified the real-time cooperation with distribution grids and neighbouring grids. With the increase of decentralized production that is also often far away from consumer centers, in our case especially wind energy, electricity has to be transported over much longer distances. That’s why we had to start important grid reinforcement projects — inside our area and to interconnect us better with our neighboring regions. Grid reinforcement provides more capacity to exchange electricity and unleashes additional flexibility potential. That is another fundamental lesson.

In the third phase, above 40%, renewables become the dominant players. They now set the scene, new market products closer to real-time are needed, ancillary services have more and more to be provided by renewables, and finally a new market design is progressively needed. The demand side, the customers, become more important and can offer flexibility. In our control area, new types of large-scale storage become an issue when we are around 60–70% renewables. And we expect then also electricity, heat and gas sectors to converge progressively.

Full article:

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/10/01/the-key-to-a-successful-energy-transition/
 
Agelbert COMMENT:


Germany is doing well. They could do better, but considering what the other highly industrialized countries are NOT doing, Germany is way ahead in the Transistion to Renewable Energy. ✨💫

My comment is about the USA but it applies to all countries on the planet.

The most important fact about fossil fuel energy products that the Hydrocarbon Hellspawn Corporations 😈 go out of their way to hide from we-the-customers is that their profit margin is based on volume sales. Yes, they get the subsidy welfare queen gravy train on top of that, but the margin is the "ball" you need to keep your eye on. 🧐

Renewable Energy is eating away  at that slim margin the fossil fuelers rely on through demand destruction. What the fossil fuelers will never admit is that you do not need to destroy 100% of the demand for polluting energy products to bankrupt the polluters. Because the polluters absolutely MUST HAVE high volume in order to make a profit, all we need to do is enable Renewable Energy to destroy between 10% and 20% of the demand.

Some will find that hard to believe. 👀 ⁉️ 🤔

Well, if you think that is baloney, I suggest you check out Amory Lovins at the Rocky Mountain Institute. Amory published  "Reinventing Fire" (over 5 years ago), the peer reviewed road map to 100% Renewable Energy. In so many words backed by hard energy facts and decades of data, he makes that crystal clear. The hyped happy talk about fossil fuels has always disguised the reality that their business model is far more fragile than they let on. The RMI knows that and has worked tirelessly to let people and fossil fuel corporations know (yes, even saying that to Shell!) that Renewable Energy is the only option for a viable biosphere AND a sustainable energy business model.

Renewable Energy is running the polluters out of business. That is why the polluters spend so much money desperately trying to convince us that they are our "loyal servants just doing what we ask them to do".


Look at this map of Federally owned land (and ocean areas). Imagine the VAST amount of Renewable Energy (geothermal, solar, wind, etc.) that can be tapped (FAR MORE than we actually need to supply all U.S. energy needs!) for the purpose of eliminating all fossil fuel use, but is, INSTEAD, reserved FOR Hydrocarbon Hellspawn 🦕🦖 PRIVATIZED PROFIT Corporate exploitation: 🤬


This video will give you and idea of the vast amount of geothermal energy in those same areas waiting to be tapped:


📢 The wind and solar potential in the same areas is off the charts as well. 

Renewable Energy knocks out 10% to 20% of the demand for dirty energy and it is OVER for the Hydrocarbon Hellspawn.

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #336 on: October 06, 2018, 12:25:46 pm »
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October 6th, 2018 by Michael Barnard

SNIPPET:

Quote
Similarly, the entire blockchain concept is a solution to a computer science problem from the 1970s that was formalized in 1982 as the Byzantine Generals’ Problem. At heart, it’s a question of how a bunch of systems can collaborate with trust when malicious actors 😈 👹 are trying to disrupt the system. Proof-of-work and proof-of-stake are different solutions on top of blockchain to that problem.

Read more:

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #337 on: October 11, 2018, 01:11:40 pm »
Optimistic Energy Source Use Projection prepared by Agelbert Five Years Ago:

Agelbert Mea Culpa: The ice free summer did not occur in 2017. It seems that will occur a few years later than my original estimates.

Despite the lack of an ice free summer in 2017 (or 2018) to spur the governments of the world to mitigate global warming, I am heartened by the increasing pressure from the IPCC, which is finally getting real about how dire the Catastrophic Climate Change threat is, and how urgent it is to to GTF off of Hydrocarbons for energy by transitioning to 100% Renewable Energy.

If, and that is a mighty big if, the goverments of the world manage to follow the transition timeline on this graphic I prepared in 2013, humanity might just get through this.

On the other hand, if they keep doing the bidding of the Hydrocarbon Hellspawn , we are done.

 The Fossil Fuelers 🦖 DID THE Clean Energy  Inventions suppressing, Climate Trashing, human health depleting CRIME,   but since they have ALWAYS BEEN liars and conscience free crooks 🦀, they are trying to AVOID   DOING THE TIME or   PAYING THE FINE!     Don't let them get away with it! Pass it on!   
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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #338 on: October 14, 2018, 09:35:49 pm »
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Against the Odds: Climate Innovation on the Rise in Oil-Dominated 🦕 Regions

October 14th, 2018 by Sponsored Content

By Diana Zaharia

SNIPPET:

Bridging the Gap

The Paris targets show that we need to leave more than 80% of known fossil fuel reserves underground. However, few companies are truly committed to leaving the coal, oil, and gas in the earth, and next to zero nations are willing to make them do so. So how do green and cleantech entrepreneurs in these regions bring their solutions to market and solve the problem of energy access by using renewables?

Part of the solution is initiated by the world’s largest green business ideas competition, called ClimateLaunchpad*, and supported by EIT Climate-KIC, a body of the European Union. In recent years the platform opened up for entrepreneurs and green business enthusiasts in countries like Nigeria, Kazakhstan, India, Malaysia, and Azerbaijan. And the numbers are astonishing.

Every year, new countries join the global network, now reaching close to 4,000 green business ideas submitted globally over the past five years, currently running in 50 locations in 45 countries. This year the Global Grand Final will take place in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 1-2 November. On top of choosing the 2018 winners, it promises to unlock a global conversation with 700 people about fixing climate change.


Fertile Grounds for Green Tech Innovators

For the second year in a row, Azerbaijan has landed in the top three of countries to enter the highest numbers of green business ideas in ClimateLaunchpad. And by doing so they are outperforming countries like England, Germany, Norway, The Netherlands in Western Europe, and Australia.

Azerbaijan is one of the birthplaces of the oil industry, with a history strongly linked to the fortunes of petroleum. But these days the country also produces some of the brightest young entrepreneurs, green tech innovators, and game changers. ✨🌞

Reyhan Jamalova

Take Reyhan Jamalova, the CEO and founder of Rainergy, the Azerbaijan start-up that produces electricity from rainwater. Reyhan is 15 years old and she was 14 when she joined ClimateLaunchpad. She was recently named one of the most promising entrepreneurs on the Forbes 30-Under-30 list.

Her technology is a smart generator that harvests energy from rain. Piezo electric crystals have the unique property to convert external pressure on the crystal into electric current. When the rain falls on the piezo electric crystals, the pressure of the raindrops generates small amounts of energy. The initial prototype of Rainergy produces 22W of power and feeds up to 22 LED lamps. While piezo electric rain generators produce only 25 micro-watts of power, the Rainergy model is much more efficient. Also it stores energy in the accumulator with the help of batteries, so that it can still be used when there is no rain. Moreover, Rainergy reduces the amount of CO2 emissions to 10 g per kWh during the production of the electricity. That is very low compared to the other current alternative energy solutions.

“I can say that as a 14 year old student I didn’t know anything about building a business. During ClimateLaunchpad I learned a lot about it, met amazing teams, and expanded my network,” says Reyhan. “We have applied for patent and the process continues. Also, we applied with The Republic of Azerbaijan State Agency on Renewable and Alternative Energy and we are still negotiating our conditions. Our main goal now is to increase the efficiency of the product and develop it further.”

Another example is CO2atalyser. This startup founded by Professor Yusif Abdullayev joined ClimateLaunchpad in Azerbaijan in 2017 to transform research into a business. Efficient conversion of CO2 being a key challenge for the chemistry community, but Prof. Abdullayev and his team developed a product that can save up to 85% in CO2 emissions for every factory using it. The technology is a unique catalyst that enables higher efficiency and long-term stability compared to traditional metal catalysts, such as nano-gold, platinum, and ruthenium.

Full article:

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/10/14/against-the-odds-climate-innovation-on-the-rise-in-oil-dominated-regions/
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

 

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