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Author Topic: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth  (Read 6738 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #225 on: December 12, 2016, 04:46:07 pm »
Katie McChesney -350.org <350@350.org> 
 
2:52 PM (1 hour ago)
 
 Friends,

2016 has been a tough year. Devastating climate impacts and the reality of a dangerous, anti-climate federal government means holding onto hope is more important than ever -- so let's take a moment to recognize our movement’s successes and learn from our victories.

A new report released today with our friends at Divest-Invest shows that the divestment movement doubled in size since 2015.
688 institutions across 76 countries who represent more than $5 trillion worth of assets have committed to divest!


And there’s more good news New York’s American Museum of Natural History, one of the world's most respected science museums, just slashed fossil fuel investments from its $650 million endowment.

This is big! Today's news shows just how powerful divestment continues to be in the resistance against a rogue fossil fuel industry, and in shining a light on its devastating impacts. In times like these, it's important to take a moment to reflect on what the divestment movement has been doing right.

•We are organizing for the long haul: It’s more important than ever to organize our communities and grow our movement from the grassroots up. The fossil fuel divestment movement has always believed that it will take more than just governments to address climate change, and that remains as true as ever.

•We are powerful: The fossil fuel industry is fighting for its life against a growing climate movement. 688 institutions including faith groups, cultural institutions, pension funds, and universities have committed to divest from fossil fuels, and resistance to fossil fuel projects is taking root all over the world. This is what happens when we organize and fight, and we must continue to fight.

•We are keeping the pressure on: In the face of a dangerous and anti-climate federal government and intensifying climate impacts, it's more crucial than ever to push our institutions -- especially locally -- to step into their leadership and fight with our communities for climate justice.

The announcement today shows just how far the divestment movement has come. Share this exciting news to show that our movement is strong and we will not back down.

Our work is not over, and there are many more challenges ahead. But the fossil fuel industry is weaker than it’s ever been and we remain strong on the side of climate justice.

Onward,


Katie for 350.org

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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #226 on: December 20, 2016, 09:59:42 pm »

Emerging nations have taken the lead on renewable energy, in 2 charts

They moved ahead last year.

Updated by David Roberts@drvoxdavid@vox.com   Dec 19, 2016, 8:30am EST

http://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2016/12/19/13979768/emerging-nations-lead-renewable-energy-two-charts
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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #227 on: December 21, 2016, 02:56:47 pm »
December 19, 2016

When It Comes to Job Creation, Renewable Energy Outshines Fossil Fuels

Shifting from a brown to a green economy could reduce the unemployment rate and create jobs throughout the country, says PERI's Heidi Garrett-Peltier.


biography

Heidi Garrett-Peltier holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and works as an assistant research professor for Political Economy Research Institute (PERI). Her research focuses on the employment impacts of public and private investments, particularly in the realm of clean-energy programs. Heidi has written and contributed to a number of reports on the clean energy economy (see Recent publications, below). She has also written about the employment effects of defense spending with co-author Robert Pollin, consulted with the U.S. Department of Energy on federal energy programs and is an active member of the Center for Popular Economics.


transcript

When It Comes to Job Creation, Renewable Energy Outshines Fossil Fuels

KIM BROWN: Welcome to The Real News Network in Baltimore. I'm Kim Brown. So, climate change and catastrophic impact on the sustainability of the economy is a topic which we frequently cover here on The Real News. It was among the topics that influenced the recent elections here in the United States and many conservative groups argue that investments in clean and renewable will lead to a loss of jobs in the fossil fuel sector. So, what will be the balance when shifting to clean and renewable energy?

Well, to try to answer this very question, Heidi Garrett-Peltier's recently-published paper titled Green versus Brown, Comparing the Employment Impacts of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy and Fossil Fuels, Using an Input-Output Model. She offers a methodology for measuring the impact of this kind of investment on employment. And Heidi Garrett-Peltier is joining us today from Amherst, Massachusetts. She is an Assistant Research Professor in the Political Economy Research Institute, also known as PERI at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She researches the impact of public and private investments on employment, especially investments in the low carbon economy. She has authored and contributed to many PERI studies and she is the author of the book, "Creating a Clean Energy Economy". And we want to thank you for being here, Heidi. We appreciate it.

HEIDI GARRETT-PELTIER: Thanks very much for having me.

KIM BROWN: So, Heidi, why is research on the trade-off between green jobs and jobs in the fossil fuel sector important?

HEIDI GARRETT-PELTIER: Well, I think there are a number of reasons it's important, but you know there's been this long-standing notion that there's some kind of a trade-off between the environment and the economy. And so, we wanted to dig into this question and see if we do something for the sake of the sustainability of the planet, could that also be good for the economy? And so, we needed to create a methodology to study the job creation effects of investing in renewable energy and investing in energy efficiency. And what would be the job losses when we shift out of fossil fuels?

KIM BROWN: So, Heidi the paper uses the term "synthetic industries". Can you explain that term to us?

HEIDI GARRETT-PELTIER: Sure. Well, so the national accounts that are used in the US and in most other countries track a number of different industries. In the US they're up to about 500 different industries that are in the national account. So, you can see how much out-put, how much employment, how much value-added is in every single one of those industries. But the problem is that the national accounts don't identify industries like the wind industry, the solar industry, energy efficiency installations, and things that we need to study from a policy perspective and then from an environmentalist's perspective. But since those aren't captured in the national accounts, we needed to figure out a way to use the information that's already in there and to recreate what we're calling a "synthetic industry" to represent what wind is. Because all of the components that go into wind, let's say the steel and the hardware and the trucking, and all of the services and all of the goods that go into the wind industry are captured somewhere in the national accounts. So, it's really a method to try to figure out where all of those components are and to create something that we can call the wind industry, to study it.

KIM BROWN: So, share with us the findings of your paper. How many jobs are created per, let's say, $1 million spent in the fossil fuel energy sector? And how many in the green sector?

HEIDI GARRETT-PELTIER: Roughly, it's about two and a half jobs created for each million spent on fossil fuels and about seven and a half in renewable energy. A little bit higher in energy efficiency, a little bit lower in renewable energy. But over seven jobs in clean energy versus two and a half jobs in fossil fuels. So, shifting and we're not necessarily going to shift dollar for dollar, from fossil fuels to clean energy, but if we think about the net effect of reducing fossil fuel spending and increasing clean energy spending, we'll create five jobs for every million dollars shift from brown energy to green energy.

KIM BROWN: So, do you think that these findings will convince policy-makers to shift public investment into the green sector in order to reduce unemployment?

HEIDI GARRETT-PELTIER: I certainly hope so. You know, when policy-makers make policy they, in general, like to have some evidence, some data to back their decision-making, so this is an opportunity to provide that data to provide the numbers for job creation. And to show that if we invested a significant but affordable amount, let's say $100 billion or $200 billion, there could be a significant impact in reducing the unemployment rate and in creating jobs throughout the country.

KIM BROWN: And what about the private sector? Aren't the findings that the green sector requires more jobs, actually means that clean energy is more expensive?

HEIDI GARRETT-PELTIER: Well, it's interesting, the costs of clean energy have been coming down dramatically. And most clean energy sources now are compatible, are comparable with natural gas and coal and oil, in terms of energy sources. And so, in terms of the effect on the consumer, and what we would spend on our electricity bills, there's not very much difference. And the other thing to remember is that the more we invest in efficiency, the less energy we need to use. So, even if it were slightly more expensive to go to renewables, we're going to be using less energy, if we also invest in efficiency. So our total energy bill can go down.

KIM BROWN: Well, as the clean energy costs come down and, I mean, in some areas they remain slightly higher than the traditional fossil fuel energy uses. So, are you concerned that your study discourages private investments in clean energy?

HEIDI GARRETT-PELTIER: Not at all, actually, because the study shows the job creation effects from spending on clean energy, whether that comes from private businesses or government funding. So, I think the paper makes the case for public support of clean energy because of the job creation effect and because of the environmental effect. That those are two reasons that public officials should want to support clean energy. But in terms of just the numbers and just the data, whether the million dollars is coming from the government or from a private business or from an individual, the job creation effects are the same.

KIM BROWN: Indeed. Well, we've been joined today with Dr. Heidi Garrett-Peltier. She has published a paper. You should check it out. It is going to be available right underneath this interview. The paper is titled Green versus Brown, Comparing the Employment Impacts of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy and Fossil Fuels, using an In-put, Out-put Model. It is fascinating stuff and we appreciate you joining us today, Heidi. Thank you so much.

HEIDI GARRETT-PELTIER: Thank you so much. I appreciate it.

KIM BROWN: And thanks for watching The Real News Network.

------------------------

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=17873
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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #228 on: January 04, 2017, 08:52:07 pm »
Clean energy will be a $50-trillion industry, but Trump policies   mean the U.S. won’t benefit


2016’s year in charts shows that clean energy revolution is unstoppable.

https://thinkprogress.org/clean-energy-charts-of-the-year-2016-93d781b55adb#.9budx8b5y
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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #229 on: January 06, 2017, 07:39:46 pm »
China Leaves U.S. in Dust With $361 Billion Renewable Energy Investment  

SNIPPET:

Renewable industry leaders in China have also championed a plan for a global renewable energy grid, which is already garnering support from neighboring countries and the United Nations.


And the country is on track to peak and then taper its greenhouse gas emissions by 2025, notes West, five years ahead of the date promised in a 2014 U.S.-China treaty.

Meanwhile, president-elect Donald Trump appears prepared to ignore economic realities and scientific research and to strip environmental regulations and double-down on coal and other dirty fuels—all while railing against solar and wind.

http://www.ecowatch.com/china-renewable-energy-investment-2180695528.html

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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #230 on: January 10, 2017, 06:37:07 pm »
Obama: Renewable Energy Revolution Is 'Irreversible', Will Outlast Trump

SNIPPET:

"But putting near-term politics aside," he wrote, "the mounting economic and scientific evidence leave me confident that trends toward a clean energy economy that have emerged during my presidency will continue and that the economic opportunity for our country to harness that trend will only grow."

First of these is that between 2008 and 2015, the U.S. economy grew by 10 percent while carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector fell by 9.5 percent, an outcome that "should put to rest the argument that combating climate change requires accepting lower growth or a lower standard of living."

Renewable energy costs fell dramatically during his years in office:
41 percent for wind,
54 percent for rooftop solar photovoltaics and
64 percent for big solar-power installations.


Clean energy now attracts twice as much global capital as fossil fuels.

http://www.ecowatch.com/obama-clean-energy-trump-2187292905.html

Agelbert NOTE:
Obama talks big, but he actually SLOWED the implementation of Renewable Energy by REFUSING to address the insane policy of subsidizing fossil fuel exploration, extraction and sales.

Had the subsidies been taken away from the fossil fuel welfare queens and given TOTALLY to Removable Energy (instead of the TOKEN pittance amount that Renewable Energy has received during the Obama Administration), we would have had MUCH MORE market penetration by Renewable Energy at this time. Obama deserves no credit for the advances in Renewable Energy, PERIOD.

 
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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #231 on: January 13, 2017, 02:57:46 pm »


Agora Energiewende

Renewable vs fossil power systems: a cost comparison (Germany  8))

By 2050, an electricity supply based on renewable energies could be either approximately as expensive as or even cheaper than a fossil-based electricity system, if the cost of a tonne of CO₂ is 50 euros or more, according to a scenario comparison by the Institute of Applied Ecology (Öko-Institut), commissioned by think tank Agora Energiewende.*

The analysis showed that the cost comparison depended mainly on future fuel and CO₂ prices, which were difficult to foretell, according to Patrick Graichen, director of Agora Energiewende.

Yet, the analysis made clear: “Not to carry out an energy transition does not mean one doesn’t have energy costs – but different ones. And those could be higher than originally expected,” said Graichen in the foreword.

A renewable energy power system would have the added value of “shielding the national economy as a whole from increasingly volatile price developments for fossil fuels,”
says the analysis. Climate protection targets cannot be reached with any of the fossil-based scenarios.

Comparison of total system costs of predominantly renewable, coal and natural gas-based power systems with CO2 prices of 50 euros in 2050. Source - Öko-Institut / Agora Energiewende 2017.

https://www.cleanenergywire.org/news/greens-propose-coal-exit-roadmap-german-power-system-costs-2050

*Like the Clean Energy Wire, Agora Energiewende is a project funded by Stiftung Mercator and the European Climate Foundation.


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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #232 on: January 19, 2017, 07:13:59 pm »
3 Midwestern States That Refuse to Abandon the Renewable Energy Revolution 
 

Natural Resources Defense Council

Jan. 18, 2017 04:13PM EST

SNIPPET:

By Susan Cosier

On the final day of the Illinois State Assembly's 2016 session, a bill was passed that environmentalists can celebrate—one that significantly increases incentives for renewable energy and energy-efficiency requirements.

Though the Democratic-led congress debated the Future Energy Jobs bill for months, legislators and Gov. Bruce Rauner worked together on a bipartisan compromise. And just in time.

http://www.ecowatch.com/renewable-energy-midwest-2197961674.html
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AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #233 on: January 20, 2017, 12:31:22 pm »
Quote
An average server draws 400 watts/ hour, ...

I stopped reading at that point because the author obviously doesn't know their watts from their elbow - or to be more accurate, Energy from Power, there's no such thing as watts/hour.

And 400 watts is a daft figure based on the maximum power rating of a desktop PC's power supply, used to power the computer, the GPU, the hard disc drives, optical disc drive, all the USB attached devices, the Ethernet connection.  Servers don't have any of that crap, and go out of their way to use low power, about 3 watts.

So can we assume that you think the internet can (and will) be powered by renewable energy then? 

What would your more enlightened calculations be for the amount of energy that the internet gobbles up?


Lucid,
The biggest energy hogs in human civilization are Oil Refineries. For example, the state of TEXAS uses 44% MORE electricity (because of OIL refinery DEMAND for electricity, whether coal, wind, nuke or gas sourced) than the next one in line (California, FAR more populous than Texas).

NO, the ERoEI of OIL DOES NOT adequately take into account that electrical energy use when figuring ERoEI of gasoline (OF COURSE!   ) or ANY OTHER OIL REFINERY PRODUCT. THAT is why the term they use cleverly has the word "invested" in it. The TRICK is to make people believe that  the amount of ENERGY required to produce the  fossil fuel product is LESS than the amount you GET from it. THAT IS A LIE.

However, until recently, since the fossil fuelers are massively "subsidized" (THEFT from taxpayers all over the WORLD) the MONEY you INVESTED provided a nice fat return.

Both PV and wind power, even with the pittance in subsidies given to them, NOW have a higher ERoEI in money.


When pollution remediation costs are figured (something NOT included in ANY fossil Fuel ERoEI figures that Palloy has quoted here from time to time.   ), Renewable Energy ALWAYS had a higher ERoEI than fossil fuels or nuclear CRAP.

Germany gets all that. Here's some projections form Germany on comparable costs of different energy sources projected to 2050.
 


Agora Energiewende

Renewable vs fossil power systems: a cost comparison (Germany  8))

By 2050, an electricity supply based on renewable energies could be either approximately as expensive as or even cheaper than a fossil-based electricity system, if the cost of a tonne of CO₂ is 50 euros or more, according to a scenario comparison by the Institute of Applied Ecology (Öko-Institut), commissioned by think tank Agora Energiewende.*

The analysis showed that the cost comparison depended mainly on future fuel and CO₂ prices, which were difficult to foretell, according to Patrick Graichen, director of Agora Energiewende.

Yet, the analysis made clear: “Not to carry out an energy transition does not mean one doesn’t have energy costs – but different ones. And those could be higher than originally expected,” said Graichen in the foreword.

A renewable energy power system would have the added value of “shielding the national economy as a whole from increasingly volatile price developments for fossil fuels,”
says the analysis. Climate protection targets cannot be reached with any of the fossil-based scenarios.

Comparison of total system costs of predominantly renewable, coal and natural gas-based power systems with CO2 prices of 50 euros in 2050. Source - Öko-Institut / Agora Energiewende 2017.

https://www.cleanenergywire.org/news/greens-propose-coal-exit-roadmap-german-power-system-costs-2050

*Like the Clean Energy Wire, Agora Energiewende is a project funded by Stiftung Mercator and the European Climate Foundation.


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« Last Edit: February 09, 2017, 07:19:53 pm by AGelbert »

AGelbert

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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #235 on: February 09, 2017, 03:21:08 pm »
Dear Dave Pugner,

Nuclear Energy is not Renewable Energy. Any discussion of Nuclear Power belongs in the Nuke Puke board.

I have moved your post and my reply Here.

Examples of Renewable Energy:
« Last Edit: February 09, 2017, 07:24:59 pm by AGelbert »
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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #236 on: February 09, 2017, 09:54:42 pm »


Feb 9, 2017

Authors Jules Kortenhorst CEO

Applying Hope in Today’s Tumultuous Times

In May of 2011, Rocky Mountain Institute cofounder Amory Lovins started his commencement address at the College of Natural Resources, University of California at Berkeley, talking about applied hope. “Many of us here stir and strive in the spirit of applied hope,” Amory said. “We work to make the world better, not from some airy theoretical hope, but in the pragmatic and grounded conviction that starting with hope and acting out of hope can cultivate a different kind of world worth being hopeful about… Applied hope requires fearlessness. Fear of specific and avoidable dangers has evolutionary value… But pervasive dread, lately promoted by some who want to keep us pickled in fear, is numbing and demotivating. When I give a talk, sometimes a questioner details the many bad things happening in the world, all the suffering in the universe, and asks how dare I propose solutions: isn’t resistance futile? The only response I’ve found is to ask, as gently as I can, ‘I can see why you feel that way. Does it make you more effective?’”

Today more than ever, Amory’s words ring with wisdom and insight. Could he possibly have foreseen, more than 5 years ago, the current state of affairs, where many of us in the environmental movement are struck by fear and worry? How do we find comfort in applying hope to our current situation? How do we apply hope to the urgent agenda of the energy transition, when the new administration is creating so much uncertainty about the path to a sustainable energy future, which we have been plotting for the 35 years RMI has been in existence?

The first hopeful point is that so much of the transition is now global, broadly supported, cost-effective, and therefore more and more irreversible. In recent years, the progress of renewable energy, electric vehicles, and other sustainable energy technologies has made a sustainable energy future both technically feasible and commercially viable. The transition toward low-carbon energy now has the support of business leaders from around the world, and solar and wind power enjoy broad public support from across the U.S. political spectrum. Countries across the globe are starting to accelerate the decarbonization of their energy systems, with some of the boldest ambition coming from vulnerable and developing nations. As a result, it is hard to see how the U.S. would return to burning coal or wasting energy as the economic energy solution of the future.

Similarly, the agreement reached in Paris in late 2015 and ratified last fall is not buckling under the uncertainty raised by the new U.S. administration. In fact, countries around the world have underlined their commitment to the Paris agreement. At the 2017 World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, Chinese President Xi Jinping stated in his opening plenary address: “The Paris Agreement is a hard-won achievement which is in keeping with the underlying trend of global development. All signatories should stick to it instead of walking away from it as this is a responsibility we must assume for future generations.” And the consensus among nation states is undergirded by similar commitments and actions from cities and provinces, where so much of the regulations and implementation of the energy revolution actually take shape.

Even while the new administration may be equivocating on its commitment to the Paris agreement and on the facts of climate science, civil society, business leaders, and philanthropists are not confused at all. Our team at RMI is doubling down, defining new ways to scale our impact, and ensuring that our programs are robust in the new political context. Our business partners are standing with us, and are telling us that they are not changing their direction. In fact, at a recent conference for members of our Business Renewables Center, 67 percent stated that the election has no impact on their renewable engagements in the U.S., while 25 percent said that it will actually increase their engagement. And increasingly our donors are helping us out, finding new and increased ways to support our work and that of our colleagues across civil society.

So all is well? We can be optimistic? No! Clarity of direction in the energy transition is a powerful enabler for the investments that are needed. This government is not yet providing that clarity. Similarly, we are concerned that science, facts, and logical arguments are no longer valued. And above all, we are deeply worried that our planet cannot afford slowing down progress toward a clean, prosperous, and secure low-carbon future.

But we go back to Amory’s wisdom and we apply hope.

First, we will continue to speak truth to power, to let our arguments do the convincing, and to stick with our mantra: In God we trust, everyone else bring facts. And for the avoidance of doubt, our government leaders fall into the second category.

We will cherish diversity, we will continue to build our international presence, and we will treat all people with respect no matter their gender, race, religion, sexuality, political convictions, or nationality.

We will look after each other, we will back each other in the battles to come, we will stand together and prove that we are in fact that unrivaled team we seek to be. And we have made the commitment to our colleagues that as an organization, they can all count on us having their backs.

And above all, we will not back down; in fact we will double down. We will carry on with our work in the conviction that we have the truth on our side, and justice in our corner. That what we do matters now more than ever. We sincerely hope that in this experiment of applied hope we find you on our side.   


http://blog.rmi.org/blog_2017_02_09_applying_hope
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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #237 on: February 09, 2017, 10:52:08 pm »


Deutsche Welle

What happens with German renewables in the dead of winter? ???

Dark and calm winter days have led some commentators to suggest that renewables are unsuitable for providing a secure energy supply, reports Tamsin Walker for Deutsche Welle. Utility association BDEW argues this weather pattern proves flexible gas and coal power stations are needed to integrate renewables into the power system.

But green energy provider Lichtblick told the author the problem is solvable because Germany is on the cusp of a whole new era in the way renewable power can be stored. 

http://www.dw.com/en/what-happens-with-german-renewables-in-the-dead-of-winter/a-37462540
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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #238 on: February 16, 2017, 11:41:12 am »
Massachusetts Might Become America's First State to Commit to 100% Renewables  ;D

SNIPPET:

"The federal government is moving backwards on clean energy. So, the states must lead," said S. David Freeman, a long-time utility executive at Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the New York Power Authority and the Tennessee Valley Authority. "Massachusetts can show the way by enacting the 100 percent renewable bills and by so doing save consumers millions of dollars in the future with a free fuel energy supply."

Given the considerable resistance renewables are likely to face in Congress   and the Trump administration , clean energy proponents are looking to state and local governments, businesses and institutions to ensure continued progress. In addition to the campaign in Massachusetts, Environment America and its partners are planning campaigns to get other states to go 100 percent renewable. And, today they will launch an effort to persuade America's colleges and universities to make similar commitments.

http://www.ecowatch.com/massachusetts-renewable-energy-2261007001.html
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Re: The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth
« Reply #239 on: February 16, 2017, 12:10:43 pm »



THURSDAY, February 16, 2017     

FIVE REASONS YOUR COMPANY SHOULD BUY OFF-SITE RENEWABLES IN 2017
 

 Corporate interest in renewable energy is skyrocketing as companies realize that off-site projects can offer the flexibility and scale necessary to meet their needs. But despite growing interest, less than one-fourth of corporate renewable energy buyers in RMI’s Business Renewables Center network have completed an off-site transaction to date. Here are five reasons why your company should buy off-site renewables in 2017.

Read More.
http://blog.rmi.org/blog_2016_02_13_five_reasons_to_buy_off_site_renewables_2017
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

 

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