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Author Topic: Sustainable Farming  (Read 3190 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Sustainable Farming
« Reply #75 on: March 07, 2018, 01:13:59 pm »
Which Countries Are the World’s Top Food Exporters?

The Netherlands is a small, densely-populated country with more than 1,300 inhabitants per square mile (500 inhabitants per square km). More than half of the nation’s land area is used for agriculture and horticulture, mostly in the form of high-tech greenhouse complexes that allow the Dutch to be global leaders in exports of tomatoes, potatoes, and onions. In terms of value, the Netherlands 🌻 🌼 🌷 🌱 is the world's second-largest exporter of food, trailing only the United States, a country which has 270 times the landmass.

More food, less water:

Since 2000, Dutch farmers have reduced their dependence on water for key crops by as much as 90 percent, and they have almost completely eliminated the use of chemical pesticides. 

Since 2009, Dutch poultry and livestock producers have decreased their use of antibiotics by as much as 60 percent. 🌟

The Dutch use “precision farming” 🌿 to get the most out of their fields. For example, the global average yield of potatoes is about nine tons per acre. The Dutch produce more than 20 tons per acre

http://www.wisegeek.com/which-countries-are-the-worlds-top-food-exporters.htm


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AGelbert

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Re: Sustainable Farming
« Reply #76 on: March 07, 2018, 02:58:43 pm »
Very cool. I knew the Netherlands had a lot of agriculture, but had no real idea exactly how advanced they'd gotten. I'm impressed.

Yes, it is truly amazing what they have done. This appears to be the only way forward in our overheated planet for those fortunate enough to live near the poles.

Meanwhile, Trump 🦀 and Fossil Fuel Fascist friends 🐉🦕🦖 are doing everything they can, whether they know it or not, to destroy all hope for future generations:

Trump touts report US is set to become world’s top oil producer

BY JOHN BOWDEN - 03/06/18 08:42 AM EST 
   
Trump touts report US is set to become world’s top oil producer

President Trump on Tuesday celebrated a report from the International Energy Agency which claims the U.S. will become the world's leading oil producer by 2023.

full article:

http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/376898-trump-touts-report-us-is-set-to-become-worlds-top-oil-producer


Some brave people🕊 are fighting this insanity in the courts. I wish them well. Trump 🦀 will do all he can to destroy them.

Court denies Trump admin’s plea to stop kids’ climate lawsuit

BY TIMOTHY CAMA - 03/07/18 02:11 PM EST 
   
Court denies Trump admin’s plea to stop kids’ climate lawsuit 

A federal appeals court Wednesday rejected the Trump administration’s attempt to dismiss a lawsuit filed by a group of kids who want to force the government to do more to fight climate change.

full article:

http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/377219-court-denies-trump-admins-plea-to-stop-kids-climate-lawsuit



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AGelbert

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Re: Sustainable Farming
« Reply #77 on: May 19, 2018, 07:29:35 pm »
Next World TV

Sand to soil Innovation in China
Reducing desert land

China is developing technology that turns deserts into productive land. 

One quarter of China is covered by dry, desert-like land and one third of its citizens are effected.

Reversing the growth of desertification.

China is bringing this technology to Africa too. 



http://www.nextworldtv.com/videos/science-and-technology-1/sand-to-soil.html
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AGelbert

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Re: Sustainable Farming
« Reply #78 on: June 20, 2018, 09:59:21 pm »
Next World TV

Common Sense Solutions - Starting Now

Green Jobs Revolution in Chicago
 

Real Jobs, Real Food= Revolution!

With a introduction by environmental advocate and civil rights activist Van Jones, this is a particularly inspiring example of revolutionizing systems that have failed.

Growing Home is a non- profit organization in Chicago that trains low income, previously homeless or incarcerated Chicagoans in the business of organic agriculture.

What can be more important than bringing real jobs and real food to neighborhoods that for decades have been bereft of both?

"A garden can turn a neighborhood where people don't have any jobs into small business owners." says Della Moran, market manager of Growing Home.

There are 80,000 vacant lots in Chicago. Orrin Williams, Employment Training Coordinator muses: " Acres of vacant land... acres of potential."

Until recently, Growing Home had been selling their organic produce only to Chicago's elite at the city's premier farmers market, high end restaurants, and a CSA program. Now the revolution is really starting: there is a market ON the South Side, FOR the South Side.

Now we're talking! 

--Bibi Farber


http://www.nextworldtv.com/videos/urban-initiatives/green-jobs-revolution-in-chicago.html
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AGelbert

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Re: Sustainable Farming
« Reply #79 on: July 22, 2018, 01:01:45 pm »
Agelbert NOTE: The second half of this video deals with some facts about healthy soils everytone should know. In the earlier part of the video I learned that children DO NOT have certain enzymes in the liver, that human adults DO have, that are extremely important.

Quote
"There’s no specific testing done for children,” he says. “There’s absolutely no published scientific evidence to show any level of safety. On the other hand, studies show there is no lower level that is safe for children.

Children, when we talk about the unborn, the newborn and grown children up to puberty, they do not have the detoxification enzymes in their livers that we have as adults. Particularly for young children, that means they have no way of detoxifying even the smallest amount of a pesticide or a chemical.

The evidence shows that even small amounts, when children are exposed in the womb, through breastfeeding or at a young age, it severely affects the way they develop. It affects the nervous system, the hormone system and the reproductive system.

When you look at the science, there are so many areas that can be negatively affected by these small amounts. Unfortunately, a lot of these effects last a lifetime. And also, we know some are intergenerational. Those children's grandchildren will be affected."


Read more:

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2018/07/22/no-safe-limit-for-pesticides-for-children.aspx
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AGelbert

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Re: Sustainable Farming
« Reply #80 on: November 25, 2018, 12:09:07 pm »

How Do We Go Beyond Purely Theoretical Sustainable Architecture? TU’s Solution: Go Out & Build It.

November 25th, 2018 by The Beam

This article was published in The Beam #6 — Subscribe now for more on the topic.

What can architects, and especially architecture students, do to respond to global issues such as informal urbanization, carbon emissions, or refugee settlement conditions? From sketches to real-work implementation, CODE architecture students design but also construct themselves climate-oriented, resource-saving and affordable projects in Bolivia, Iraq, Chile, and Europe. Their strategy — make the most of a space’s natural properties, culture, and climate; in other words: find local solutions to global issues. Professor Ralf Pasel, head of CODE Institute, just came back from the latest project in Bolivia.

 

Quote
“Our challenge is really to develop strategies that promotes climate orientated buildings that do not rely on high tech, standardized and costly processes.”

Hi Ralf, thank you for taking the time to answer our questions. Can you first introduce us to CODE?

CODE — CONstruction & Design is an institute at the Technical University of Berlin, which spans a bridge between theoretical education and practical work. What it actually does is combine three things: teaching, research, and practice. The projects are proper professional works but they are also case studies throughout which students research issues such as carbon emissions. Then…we build them.

What comes into consideration before you decided “let’s build an agriculture school in Bolivia”?

First of all, we set quite strict criteria, which means that we have a sort of CODE X through which we choose projects. We try to be very careful about not being competitive to avoid any market or monetary dimension. The most important are the social and the environmental relevance; they are the driving forces behind these projects.

How is it possible to implement environment friendly designs in poor areas? Does it not require expensive technologies that make these projects difficult to reproduce locally?

Not really, our challenge is really to develop strategies that promotes climate orientated buildings that do not rely on high tech, standardized and costly processes. Our challenge really is to think in term of design rather than techniques, consider what is already offered by the location, orientation, and climate rather than what we need to bring or to buy.

How did you apply this idea to your project in Bolivia?

 

For the project in Bolivia, which was to build an agriculture school in the Cordillera, we were at more than 3,000 meters above the sea level, with a difference of temperature between day and night time of almost 30 degrees, and winds blowing in all different directions because of the surrounding mountains. So we asked ourselves ‘how can we deal with these such extreme thermic conditions?’ Well, for instance, the school was built with a closed facade, only windows to internal patios so that we can harvest the heat gain in the evening. We also built a double ventilated roof to make sure the heat does not accumulate in the daytime. Then, there should be no need for radiators or ventilators anymore. We also benefit from an incredible solar radiation, so we oriented the roof to make sure the solar panels get the most of it, and we implemented dry toilets to reduce the use of water and generate compost for the agriculture school.

Does your project address environmental issues or does it simply adjust to its environment?


I would rather say that it is an ‘environment induced project’ because the design is made in such a way that it uses the potential of nature and climate. So rather than fighting extreme weather conditions we just try to ‘sail the boat’. We analyze the impact of sun to orientate the solar panel roof or the direction of the wind to create efficient ventilation systems. We can do that by learning to read the direction of the wind on the grass or by looking at the flight of the birds to see the different thermic winds.

Further to the environmental impacts, which other positive impacts did you achieve?

What we do is that we very quickly integrate local partners in the process. For instance, we worked with a women bricklayers cooperative, helping them set up their business and provided them with proper security uniforms. We focused on material and tools that do not require being dependent on suppliers so that they can reuse these techniques for their own houses. Meanwhile, this same women’s cooperative trained the next group of students coming to Bolivia, so we have a sort of circular education movement. We also involve local universities or the students of the agriculture school to come to help and learn about sustainable construction methods.

 


What’s next on your plate?

At the moment we are trying to transfer the experience we had in South America into the European context. Because of the refugee situation in Germany we need a lot of social housing projects. We are currently developing two projects for these ‘urban newcomers’ through the initiative Home Not Shelter.

Interview by Caroline Sorbier.

Subscribe to The Beam for more on the topic.

Read more from The Beam.

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/11/25/how-do-we-go-beyond-purely-theoretical-sustainable-architecture-tus-solution-go-out-build-it/



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