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Author Topic: Batteries  (Read 4536 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #105 on: June 14, 2018, 09:34:20 pm »


Regulators Approve Five Grid-Scale Lithium-Ion Battery Projects 💫 for Southern California

June 8, 2018

By Renewable Energy World Editors

         
Regulators in California gave San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) approval to move forward with development of five grid-scale lithium-ion battery projects in San Diego and Orange counties.

The five projects will deliver a total of 83.5 MW/334 MWh to SDG&E’s energy storage portfolio. SDG&E submitted the projects to the California Public Utilities Commission (PUC) in April 2017.

According to SDG&E, the projects include:

֍ A 30-MW/120-MWh lithium-ion battery storage facility in San Diego, Calif., that will be built by Renewable Energy Systems (RES) America and will be completed by December 2019

֍ A 4-MW/16-MWh lithium-ion battery storage facility in San Juan Capistrano, Calif, that will be built by Advanced Microgrid Solutions and will be completed by December 2019

֍ A 40-MW/160-MWh lithium-ion battery facility in Fallbrook, Calif., that will be built by Fluence and will be completed by March 2021

֍ A 6.5-MW/26-MWh lithium-ion battery storage facility in Escondido, Calif., that will be built by Powin Energy and will be completed by June 2021

֍ A 3-MW/12-MWh lithium-ion battery storage facility in Poway, Calif., that will be built by Enel Green Power and will be completed by December 2021

The PUC also approved a demand response program equaling 4.5 MW. OhmConnect will provide the demand response service.

Lead image credit: San Diego Gas & Electric

https://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2018/06/regulators-approved-five-gridscale-lithiumion-battery-projects-for-southern-california.html
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Re: Batteries
« Reply #106 on: June 20, 2018, 05:49:18 pm »
I have been meaning to get back to this.... but I have been behind the ball lately. I stick with my CORDED power tools for resilience, position....

But since we clearly have some Electrical guys here...and me being a luddite, I see an opportunity.

I have a decent solar system... but that only lasts until the batteries die. Some people have solar that feeds into the grid. No grid, no batteries, done.

But here is a question I have to reach out to electrical guys for.

Can someone tell me about a practical DC motor that I can get some work out of by directly  tying it into the solar panels. Only works when sun is available.

Give me your thoughts guys. Can it be turned into, say, a wood saw.... or.... something that turns a reworked  generator for sunny day, power tool use.

That should give you folks something to chat about or share your knowledge of where to look for someone doing similar.

There is no easy way to run directly off the solar panels being marketed today at insanely cheap prices. the charge controllers that are charging batteries today are using panel strings of 70-200 volts and converting it down to 12-48 and are referred to as MPPT chargers. They absolutely need a battery to feed to or they won't feed out. The older charge controllers that were just a complicated switch were operating panels that matched the voltage of the battery banks and are called PWM controllers. those ones will sometimes feed out without a battery but its iffy. As RE mentioned it would technically be possible to run a 36 volt motor off of the 60 cell 200-300 watt panels. They output in full sun at about 32-40 volts at 6-8 amps. It would be tricky though. Say you wanted to run a table saw you would want to re jig it to incorporate a flywheel of some sort or have 2 or 3 panels hooked up in parallel to have 2 or 3 times the amps of the motor to draw from in case the sun goes away or you bog down. To me that is a waste of resources since if batteries are toast panels which are way more complicated will fetch a premium and weird voltage dc motors would be almost non existent. BUT... Even an almost dead battery bank as long as the cells have not shorted out can be the buffer you need to run the controllers and act as a pass through for the power from the panels. The trick would be to start treating your batteries as irreplaceable. In times of crisis think of them as delicate senior citizens. You eliminate all the shocks we inflict on them daily. In that scenario you wait for the sun to be out and charging at more then what you need and start turning on devices to match the sun; freezer/fridge conversion, well pump with an insanely large pressure tank, maybe some electric chainsaw work etc. All of these are usually inverter functions. You aim to use almost all the solar in passthrough and DO things with it and dribble a little to your geriatric batteries to keep them charged and as alive as they can be. When the sun goes away you power down all the ac, turn off the inverter and coast on a few dc led lights. You've stored the energy as cold, pressurized water and sawn wood instead of chemical potential energy. In that kind of scenario the 2000 cycle battery bank can be pushed into the 8000 cycles realm and if we have not figured out something different within 20 years we are already dead anyways since that is the lifespan of the inverters charge controllers etc,,, Its more complicated then that and would require beer a sketch pad, a pencil and me waving my hands a lot but that is the jist of it. Its easy enough to experiment with if you want; find a poor old battery bank from a recycler at the same voltage as your existing one and switch over to model a battery of much diminished capabilities and practice using power directly.I know a nice old lady in the woods who lasted 14 years on her original undersized batteries with very minor lifestyle hacks let alone the hard core alterations proposed above. Food for thought. Back to work...
Cheers,  David

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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #107 on: June 20, 2018, 05:55:29 pm »
I can't ever see running any device straight off the panels without a batt system of some sort to have a power buffer while working.  What if the clouds come out right when you are in the middle of ripping some plywood?  One old 12V Car Batt in decent shape will do for a buffer in most cases I would say, however brand spanking new a deep cycle marine batt isn't that expensive.  I just bought a new one for the old Bugout Machine at Batteries & Bulbs for $90.  Duracell, good brand.

In terms of power to do your chores, as I mentioned my 1000W 36V DC motors would turn just about anything including a concrete saw.  You can get bigger than that though if you want to run a **** sawmill or something.  I looked at buying this 5000W motor to soup up my Ewz and make it into a towing powerhouse and/or Cripple Racing Machine.  You can get different models operating at 48V, 72V or 96V.



RE

Yup. That is the scale we are talking about. Mini, Micro scale sawmill. Something like a band saw. Enough to buck up coppice wood... or run a wheat grinder. If the job gets called by cloud... it's done. Do do something else. C5 rule of survival. If all else fails, lower your expectations.

I do seem to recall, back in the old days, there were DC motors long before we switched to AC. I am guessing there are some sitting in some old barns as antiques. But it is like searching for the secrets of the pyramids or the arc of the covenant.

I know its there. I hope it is there. It just takes some Gandolf to step in and say, "Ya the P37 R2D2 jack motor. My granddad used to pump the well with it". I'm looking for "the holy grail"

I have found the best source for variable dc motors to be treadmills. I have a few of them in my pile of interesting things. They would work on any panel from 12 volt to 100 volts combined voltage. They would work for pumps, bandsaws etc. For shits and giggles take a look at this guy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7gp3XjsH64
He makes homemade 12 volt batteries. a rack of these would act as the passthrough battery i mentioned above. my point is just that we always talk about the batteries but from a construction point of view they are the simplest component to recreate in a scaled down world. Much easier then a motor.

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #108 on: June 20, 2018, 06:57:14 pm »
ENERGY STORAGE

Residential Batteries Almost Beat Out Utility-Scale Deployments Last Quarter

Home energy storage projects rivaled utility-scale deployments for the first time, according to GTM Research’s latest Energy Storage Monitor.

JULIAN SPECTOR JUNE 06, 2018

Residential storage has been growing in popularity and prominence.

The historically tiny residential energy storage segment won big in Q1 2018, according to the latest deployment data.

Utility-scale projects, the usual workhorse of the energy storage industry, dropped massively compared to last year’s Q1, when the Aliso Canyon procurements came online and set a record for energy capacity. What saved the quarter from historically low performance turned out to be the aggregate growth of all the little systems popping up in customers' homes.

"Residential storage has been growing in popularity and prominence," said Brett Simon, senior analyst at GTM Research. "It’s getting cheaper. Folks are more aware of it and are asking for it. Solar installers are doubling down on it as a new business model." 

Residential deployments beat commercial deployments, 15.9 megawatts to 11.7 megawatts, according to the latest Energy Storage Monitor from GTM Research and the Energy Storage Association. Even more impressively, home batteries rivaled utility-scale deployments, which only clocked in at 16 megawatts.

That’s an unprecedented and jolting development that is worth emphasizing.

Ever since GTM Research began tracking storage deployments in 2013, residential batteries appeared as the faintest of slivers on the industrywide bar graph, nonzero but totally insubstantial.

Now, for the first time, the smattering of a few kilowatts here and there has nearly overtaken the giants of grid-scale mega-projects. That's a result both of the mega-projects not showing up this quarter and the micro-projects swarming into action.

The historically tiny residential energy storage segment won big in Q1 2018, according to the latest deployment data.

Utility-scale projects, the usual workhorse of the energy storage industry, dropped massively compared to last year’s Q1, when the Aliso Canyon procurements came online and set a record for energy capacity. What saved the quarter from historically low performance turned out to be the aggregate growth of all the little systems popping up in customers' homes.

"Residential storage has been growing in popularity and prominence," said Brett Simon, senior analyst at GTM Research. "It’s getting cheaper. Folks are more aware of it and are asking for it. Solar installers are doubling down on it as a new business model."

Dialing into the numbers, it’s clear that California and Hawaii drove this newfound strength with state-level growth that merits no less than the technical designation: "bonkers."

California’s resi sector rose 3,833 percent year-over-year in terms of megawatts, 4,324 percent in terms of megawatt-hours. The fact that energy capacity grew more reflects that these systems are sizing up to hold more duration.


Those two states accounted for 74 percent of the home systems deployed.

Notably, there wasn't any extreme, one-off event driving the surge in residential deployments in the way that the Aliso Canyon procurements did for big projects a year ago. That means that the forces that produced this quarter's outcome — transitions away from solar net metering, new business models with low upfront costs, newfound interest in resilience — will likely continue through the year.

In fact, the first two quarters of storage installations tend to be smaller than the last two, based on how the industry has operated historically. Such a large opening quarter hints at an even bigger second half.

"The residential market this year is going to be over five times the size of the market last year, in megawatt terms," Simon said.

The future looks even brighter, thanks to the California Energy Commission’s newly passed solar PV mandate for new homes starting in 2020. GTM Research calculates that this policy will cause a 26 percent upside in its base-case residential storage projection for 2020 onward.

Bigger doesn't always mean better

Meanwhile, the utterly California-dominated commercial sector continued its zig-zaggy volatility, dropping 53 percent from its record high last quarter. California giveth and California taketh away.

The nature of utility-scale construction lends itself to even more lumpiness in its quarterly swings.

Last quarter, only five projects hit the wires. That said, they managed to deliver the third-highest energy capacity of any quarter, because each new project delivered 4-hour duration.

The only two quarters with more energy deployed included the Aliso Canyon rollout, when Southern California delivered a massive, fast-tracked procurement to deal with a regional gas constraint.

Though quarterly deployments dropped compared to last year, the pipeline for front-of-the-meter storage increased 76 percent in a year, from 9,217 megawatts to 16,196 megawatts.

Overall, the industry is on track to deliver 557 megawatts this year, and GTM expects the annual deployments will hit 3,688 megawatts in 2023, the final year of its projection. That’s up 12 percent or 909 megawatts from the projection last quarter, due to promising developments since that time.

Miscellaneous signs o’ the times:

California has officially pulled ahead of PJM as the largest cumulative storage market. This actually happened before the last quarterly report, but hasn’t gotten a ton of play. PJM kicked off the utility-scale storage industry, but its frequency regulation market has essentially stopped growing. Thus, the baton has passed to California, where a much wider menu of services and market products promise more robust long-term growth. (In the apples-to-apples comparison of just utility-scale, PJM still leads by 100 megawatts.)

All of the utility-scale projects in Q1 had 4-hour duration. So long frequency reg, with your short-duration systems.
Front-of-the-meter battery deployments happened in Florida and Arizona. Texas and California, which led the previous quarter, didn't show up this time.

In the weeds but indicative of a broader trend, the researchers added two new states to the roster that they track quarterly: Colorado and Nevada. Both had promising new policy developments and utility activities to presage a more active storage market in the years ahead.
***

Download the free executive summary of the U.S. Energy Storage Monitor here.

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/residential-batteries-almost-beat-utility-scale-deployments-last-quarter#gs.tn6l9EE

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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #109 on: June 27, 2018, 08:33:16 pm »
World’s First Battery For Offshore Wind Completed At Floating Offshore Wind Farm

June 27th, 2018 by Joshua S Hill

Norwegian energy company Equinor announced this week that it has completed the installation of the world’s first battery for an offshore wind farm at its 30 megawatt (MW) Hywind Scotland floating offshore wind farm, which is the world’s first floating wind farm.

Hywind Scotland - World's First Floating Wind FarmFirst approved by the Scottish Government back in late 2015, Hywind Scotland began generating electricity in October of last year and, in February, Equinor (then known as Statoil) revealed that not only has the project been a success, but that the project is outperforming expectations and generating electricity at levels consistently above that of its seabound offshore cousins, wind turbines that are built into the seafloor.

Even before Hywind was completed and operational, however, the two companies behind the project — Statoil/Equinor and Masdar — conceived of plans to add a battery storage option to the project, which would be the first time a battery storage project has been attached to an offshore wind energy project. The project was given the go-ahead, and earlier this year the two companies announced they would use the project, known as Batwind, to further study the potential of integrating battery systems with wind and solar.

Announced on Wednesday, Equinor revealed that Batwind has been completed and the 1 MW battery provided by Younicos, and located at an onshore substation, will now be able to dynamically balance power from the offshore wind farm.

#Batwind, which stores energy ⚡ from the floating wind farm #Hywind, was opened in Peterhead, Scotland today.

— Equinor (@Equinor) June 27, 2018

“The variability of renewable energy can to a certain extent be managed by the grid,” said Sebastian Bringsvaerd, Development Manager for Hywind and Batwind. “But to make renewable energy more competitive and integrate even more renewables to the grid, we will need to find new, smart solutions for energy storage to provide firm power. How to do this in a smart and value creating way is what we are aiming to learn from Batwind.”

“We’re very proud to partner with Equinor and provide our expertise from over 200 megawatts of storage projects to this pioneering project,” added Karim Wazni, Managing Director of Younicos. “By adding energy storage capabilities to another world “first” – the world’s first floating wind farm – we hope to demonstrate the essential role that storage plays as we continue pushing the frontier in producing sustainable energy. Specifically, we’ve equipped Batwind with our intelligent Y.Q software, which ensures that the battery ’learns’ the optimal storage conditions. Our software tells the battery when to store electricity and for how long, and when and how much to inject back onto the grid.”

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/06/27/worlds-first-battery-for-offshore-wind-completed-at-floating-offshore-wind-farm/
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Re: Batteries
« Reply #110 on: August 09, 2018, 02:38:52 pm »
INSIDEEVs

August 9, 2018

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Tesla Batteries 🕵️


You have questions, Two Bit da Vinci has answers.  ;D

One of the main reasons Tesla is where it is today is because of batteries. They attacked the problem of electric vehicle range — the traditional weak point of EVs — by choosing the most energy-dense cell available and then developed the battery pack to suit its needs. The result was a more than 200 miles of range and all the power needed to not only turn heads, but to turn an entire industry on its ear.

Read more:

https://insideevs.com/everything-about-tesla-batteries-video/

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #111 on: August 12, 2018, 03:47:45 pm »
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Volt meter image by Thomas Kelley on Unsplash; container storage image from company

How to Understand Battery Life

August 12th, 2018 by Sponsored Content

The idea that batteries have a ‘life’ is familiar. We’ve all experienced a ‘dying’ cell phone battery with its charge draining, usually at the most inconvenient time. And you might be curious about how this affects long-duration energy storage. To fully understand battery life, let’s start with a few fundamentals.

How to Understand Battery Life

Battery Fundamentals

A battery stores energy in chemical form, then converts it into electrical energy. Battery ‘life’ refers to three characteristics: performance, longevity, and capacity.

Let’s explain the semantics of these words a bit further:

Performance life is the run time of a battery on full charge.

Longevity refers to the number of charge cycles a battery can take before it no longer charges.

Capacity means that a new battery will charge up to 100% but an older battery will charge possibly up to 70%. For example, the Tesla Powerwall has a warranty of ten years at 70% capacity. Tesla recognizes that the battery will lose 30% or more in capacity over time. High DoD also affects capacity negatively.

Rechargeable batteries have a finite life. Every time you charge your phone, for example, small (and detrimental) changes occur to the battery’s electrodes. Eventually, these changes will kill the battery, preventing it from being able to charge or store energy.

Why ‘Depth of Discharge’ Affects Battery Life

The number of times you charge a battery affects its lifespan, but so does the depth of discharge (DoD) – how much energy of the total battery capacity is drawn off at a time.

You may have received instructions about your cell phone telling you to recharge the battery before it completely ‘dies.’ That’s because a 100% depth of discharge puts stress on a battery and shortens its lifespan. Think of it like driving an older car and letting the engine oil run out. You may be able to drive for several hundred (or thousand) miles, but eventually, the engine will stop working. A battery responds similarly. Consistently drawing a high level of energy per use disrupts the interior of the battery and affects performance.

When purchasing rechargeable batteries, especially those for solar power storage, the depth of discharge becomes an essential qualifier of performance. You may see battery labeling showing a range of lifecycle options such as 25,000 cycles at 30% DoD or 1,000 cycles at 75% DoD.

Cost Implications of Depth of Discharge for Solar Storage

When you shift to stored solar power for your home or business, you’ll likely want the option of a deeper discharge. Why? Because you’ll need access to as much stored energy as possible to keep lights, appliances, and other devices fully functioning. But remember, drawing down the battery deeply in the short run will reduce the number of cycles the battery operate effectively.

The result is a higher cost per kWh over the shortened lifespan of the battery. For example:

Let’s say your 10-kWh lithium-ion battery costs $6,000 and promises 1,000 cycles at 80% DoD. That means you’ll have 8,000 kWh across its life (10 kWh x 1,000 cycles x .8 ), and you’ll pay $0.75 per kWh ($6,000 / 8,000).
If you run the same battery at 20% DoD, you may see 10,000 cycles or 20,000 kWh across its life – and only pay $0.30 per kWh. Unfortunately, you may not be able to power all your appliances or lights when you need them.


The Vanadium Advantage

Vanadium flow batteries and battery life are different than traditional lithium-ion batteries. A vanadium battery uses a liquid, non-flammable electrolyte solution to store energy, enabling it to deliver at 100% depth of discharge without degrading capacity over time. This means a StorEn* vanadium battery provides the full power you need for thousands of cycles and many years – keeping the cost per kWh for solar storage lower than other options. Furthermore, the electrolyte is 100% reusable in a new battery, which means there is no need to mine new vanadium.

You can find out more about StorEn’s products and invest in their reliable, cost-effective technology by visiting their investment campaign.

*Full disclosure: This post is supported by StorEn Technologies. CleanTechnica does not provide investment advice of any kind. Please consult an investment professional or use your own independent judgement on investment matters.

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/08/12/how-to-understand-battery-life/

Quote
Shiggity

A big difference that I've found is cells vs. pouches.

Pouches suck. They're structurally weak, prone to thermal runaway, and are harder to control at a fine software level.

Flow batteries will be great in places that need massive energy dumps and influxes, like smelting aluminum and steel. Or sitting on a large distribution center. Flow batteries are annoying because they are super heavy and big, you typically need a large crane to get them installed, which is spendy.
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Re: Batteries
« Reply #112 on: August 20, 2018, 04:54:48 pm »
INSIDEEVs

The Truth About Tesla Model 3 Batteries: Part 2

Published on Aug 18, 2018  89,024 views  :o ;D


Two Bit da Vinci

Go HERE to view Part 1.  8)
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Re: Batteries
« Reply #113 on: August 31, 2018, 05:52:22 pm »
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Tesla “Big Battery” Responds To “Power System Emergency” In Australia 

August 29th, 2018 by Steve Hanley

Last Saturday afternoon, lighting strikes in Australia temporarily interrupted transmission lines that interconnect the electrical grids in the eastern part of the country. For a time, the grids in Queensland and South Australia were turned into energy islands, cut off from the national grid infrastructure. The Australian Energy Market Operator termed the incident a “power system emergency.”

Tesla big battery in South Australia

Customers in New South Wales and Victoria experienced widespread power outages while those in in Queensland and South Australia noticed little more than a momentary flicker of their lights. In Queensland, that happy circumstance was due to an abundance of renewable energy available to meet that state’s energy needs. Some of the excess was being shared with NSW before the transmission line between the two was put out of commission.

South Australia was largely unaffected, thanks to the Hornsdale Power Reserve, known affectionately in SA as the “Tesla Big Battery.” It kicked in immediately to add 84 MW of power to the state’s electrical grid and stabilize the frequency of the local grid, which was disturbed when the link to neighboring Victoria was disrupted.

The success of the “Big Battery” was a silent rebuke to new Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, a Donald Trump wannabe who channeled US senator James Inhofe when he brought a lump of coal onto the floor of parliament earlier this year to demonstrate his love of coal. In July, Morrison uttered these sage words to demonstrate his vast storehouse of knowledge about energy policies:

“I mean, honestly, by all means have the world’s biggest battery, have the world’s biggest banana, have the world’s biggest prawn like we have on the roadside around the country, but that is not solving the problem.” The Big Banana is an amusement park located in Coffs Harbor in northern NSW.


Big Banana NSW

Last year, Morrison went out of his way to mock the Tesla battery installation in South Australia. “I don’t care if it’s wind, coal, the world’s biggest battery, but you’ve got to measure it on its contribution, and it doesn’t measure up to a big solution. 30,000 SA households could not get through watching one episode of Australia’s Ninja Warrior with this big battery. So let’s not pretend it is a solution.”

As RenewEconomy so cogently points out, “The Tesla big battery, also known as the Hornsdale Power Reserve, was able to play a key role in helping keep the grid stable and the lights on in South Australia on Saturday, in its biggest threat since the 2016 blackout. It did solve a problem. Morrison’s Big Banana, on the other hand, wasn’t able to lift a finger to help customers in NSW. Such a shame they didn’t have a battery to help them.” It also noted that people in SA were able to watch their tellies uninterrupted by the crisis.

The outage occurred on the first day of Morrison’s term in office after ousting Malcolm Turnbull last week. Compounding the ignorance of his administration, Matt Canavan, the country’s new resources minister, told The Australian after the event, “The system has heightened vulnerability because of the reliance on interstate and unreliable power. More investment in coal, gas or hydro would firm up the system, create more supply and bring down prices.”

That’s a lie. When the interstate transmission lines went down, NSW was forced to shed 724 MW of load and Victoria 280 MW. In South Australia, no load was shed. None. As in, not any. AEMO said after the event the outages had nothing to do with any loss of generation. In fact, no generator — whether coal, gas, wind or solar — tripped off as a result of the transmission failure. So, sorry, Matt Canavan — no amount of extra generating capability would have helped the situation.

Morrison has appointed Angus Taylor, a fierce critic of renewable energy policies, as his new energy minister, leading the Australian Clean Energy Council to declare that is is now up to the individual states to move the renewable energy revolution forward with no expectation of assistance from the federal government, according to a report by Energy Matters.

If you think it is merely a coincidence that Australia and the US are both now hostages to fossil fuel advocates 🐉🦕🦖 , you are simply not paying attention.
Despite some recent efforts to greenwash themselves, the fossil fuel interests are busy committing crimes against humanity in the background while they continue to stuff their pockets with oil-soaked cash and coal-polished coins, and then use some of that money to buy influence at the highest levels.

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/08/29/tesla-big-battery-responds-to-power-system-emergency-in-australia/

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #114 on: September 24, 2018, 01:25:02 pm »
Michigan utility unveils new battery at university

Sep. 22, 2018

KALAMAZOO, Mich. (AP) — A Michigan utility has unveiled a new battery to store renewable energy at Western Michigan University.

The battery can store enough solar and wind energy to supply about 1,000 homes with an hour of power  , said Consumers Energy Project Manager Nathan Washburn. The battery will be used to keep energy output stable even when there’s cloud coverage, he said.

“This battery is a big step forward for Consumers,”  Washburn said.

Consumers Energy partnered with the university in 2016 to create an 8.5-acre solar power plant. The new battery will store power from the plant and provide energy to residents in the region, said Tim Sparks, vice president of electric grid integration for Consumers Energy.

“In the future we do believe that these will be one of the main sources of electricity for our toolbox,” Sparks said.   

The company and Michigan State University consultants will study the facility to determine how battery storage could be used around Michigan. Western Michigan University will also be able to work with the utility on electric battery research and operations.

“With the solar array and now the first battery, we have this rare combination to both generate solar power and then think about how to store it and use it for consumers,” WMU President Edward Montgomery said. “For meeting peak-load demands, meeting those times during cloudy days. How do you solve those problems? And we can be at the forefront of that.”

U.S. Rep. Fred Upton said more than 40 percent of the state’s electricity will be from renewable energy sources by 2040. 👍

“To do that you have to have battery storage for when the wind doesn’t blow and the sun doesn’t shine,” he said.

https://apnews.com/d2f16d41654748d98522b6c2701c7495/Michigan-utility-unveils-new-battery-at-university

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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #115 on: October 01, 2018, 06:32:16 pm »
September 30th, 2018 by Zachary Shahan


Quote
Batteries for electric cars and other light-duty electric vehicles grew from an output of 1 GWh in 2011 to an output of 37 GWh in 2017. Furthermore, batteries for electric buses hit another 26 GWh in 2017. 😎



Read More;

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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #116 on: October 18, 2018, 02:03:09 pm »

Tabuchi Eco Intelligent Battery System (EIBS) 💫


Learn more:

https://www.tabuchiamerica.com/residential


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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #117 on: November 09, 2018, 02:55:45 pm »
What Is A Solid-State Battery and Will They Solve Our Battery Life Problems?

MICHAEL CRIDER  @michaelcrider

NOVEMBER 9, 2018, 6:40AM EDT

SNIPPET:

Solid-state batteries promise a few distinct advantages over their liquid-filled cousins: better battery life, faster charging times, and a safer experience.

Solid-state batteries compress the anode, cathode, and electrolyte into three flat layers instead of suspending the electrodes in a liquid electrolyte. That means you can make them smaller—or at least, flatter—while holding as much energy as a larger liquid-based battery. So, if you replaced the lithium-ion or lithium-polymer battery in your phone or laptop with a solid-state battery the same size, it would get a much longer charge. Alternatively, you can make a device that holds the same charge much smaller or thinner.

Solid-state batteries are also safer, since there’s no toxic, flammable liquid to spill, and they don’t output as much heat as conventional rechargeable batteries. When applied to batteries that power current electronics or even electric cars, they might recharge much faster, too—ions could move much more quickly from the cathode to the anode.

According to the latest research, a solid-state battery could outperform conventional rechargeable batteries by 500% or more in terms of capacity, and charge ⚡ up in a tenth of the time. 👍

Read more:

https://www.howtogeek.com/393503/what-is-a-solid-state-battery-and-will-they-solve-our-battery-life-problems/
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Re: Batteries
« Reply #118 on: November 30, 2018, 08:44:55 pm »
Common battery types used in solar+storage

By Kelly Pickerel | November 27, 2018

SNIPPET:

Incorporating energy storage into a solar array is not as easy as just picking a battery off the shelf. Certain chemistries work better in certain environments, and storage capabilities are influenced by the solar application.
Credit: EIA

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) released a trends report on the U.S. storage market in May 2018. The report found that lithium-ion batteries represented more than 80% of the installed power and energy capacity of large-scale energy storage applications. Nickel- and sodium-based batteries represented around 10% while lead-acid and other chemistries rounded out large-scale battery representation.

Within small-scale battery installations (where commercial and industrial installs make up 90% of capacity), EIA was unable to pinpoint specific chemistry data, but it can be assumed that lithium-based batteries still reign supreme. Lead-acid batteries have been popular within off-grid installations for decades, but lithium-ion’s longer cycle life, lighter weight and decreased maintenance have made it the preferred choice for large-scale, EV and residential applications.

But lithium-ion is not the only—or best—choice out there for batteries used in solar+storage installations. 👀 Here’s a brief rundown of the common storage technologies used in the industry, and which chemistries some popular brand names use.

Full  article:

https://www.solarpowerworldonline.com/2018/11/common-battery-types-used-in-solarstorage/
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