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Author Topic: Batteries  (Read 4361 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #75 on: November 22, 2017, 07:50:19 pm »

Vanadium Flow Batteries for Cost-Effective Energy Storage: An Interview with Angelo D’Anzi, CTO of StorEn Technologies

November 21st, 2017 by Sponsored Content

SNIPPET:

How can you achieve such a low cost per kWh? ???

StorEn TechnologyCost is crucial for the adoption of energy storage. Our work is about bringing evolution to the technology with the objectives to improve performance as a way to drive down costs. We developed a disruptive battery technology based on both chemical and engineering solutions, leading to a 50% cost reduction. We are targeting a price of $400/kWh with a 25 year duration with no decay.  :o 


The great breakthrough is our innovative high-power electrodes made with nanomaterials and a proprietary functionalization process. With this innovation we have doubled power density over traditional batteries, while running at low pressure.

The ability to run at low pressure means that less of the battery’s own energy is required to run the pumps, hence round-trip efficiency is increased. Additionally, duration of the battery is also increased. To support the electrochemical activity, we couple our Hi-Power Nano-Structured Carbon Electrode to our MULTIGRID™ multipoint flow distribution to deliver an increase in power in excess of 50%.

We also wanted to make a battery that was virtually maintenance-free, like a car battery, for trouble-free operations and reduced Total Costs of Ownership. We developed two proprietary systems, RESAFE™ and EQUILEVELS™. These two systems support a battery that is virtually maintenance-free by eliminating service activities.

Our battery can be monitored remotely with our built-in BMS (Battery Management System). Therefore we implement a shift from scheduled on-site inspections to a maintenance-on-demand model. For example, if one of our batteries was installed in a remote telecommunications tower for power back-up, remote monitoring can reduce or eliminate the need for periodic on-site visits, which can translate in significant cost savings.

Full article:

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/11/21/vanadium-flow-batteries-for-cost-effective-energy-storage/
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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #76 on: November 24, 2017, 02:09:36 pm »
Tesla Completes World’s Largest Li-ion Battery (129 MWh) In South Australia (#NotFree)

 

November 23rd, 2017 by James Ayre

SNIPPET:



Tesla has now finished construction work on the 129 megawatt-hour (MWh) energy storage facility that it was contracted to build in South Australia, the government of the region has revealed.

Full article:

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/11/23/tesla-completes-worlds-largest-li-ion-battery-129-mwh-energy-storage-facility-south-australia-notfree/
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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #77 on: December 23, 2017, 04:33:09 pm »
Agelbert NOTE: The significant thing about this EV service is that they use a new type of battery technology (solid electrolyte) that is, for all practical purposes, impervious to fire from overheating or violent penetration during a crash. Learn more about this exciting new Lithium Metal Polymer (LMP®) battery technology  below.


blueSG network of 1,000 shared electric Bluecar vehicles in Singapore


THE SERVICE

Launched in the year of 2017, BlueSG offers a new smart and affordable mobility option to all Singaporeans, complementing public transport.

BlueSG members will have access to a network of 1,000 shared electric Bluecar vehicles, 24/7, at self-service stations located in public housing, city center and commercial estates around Singapore. The service is point to point, which means there’s no need to return the car to your starting point, nor to bear the cost of maintenance or insurance of a own vehicle.
The BlueSG service will be available to anyone over 21 years of age with a valid driver’s license.

BlueSG is a subsidiary of the Bolloré Group which has launched the world’s largest and most successful car sharing, Autolib’ in Paris. . BlueSG will become the world’s second largest EV car sharing service.
 

THE PROJECT


A Request for Information (RFI) was issued in 2014 by the Land Transport Authority of Singapore (LTA) and Economic Development Board (EDB) and received proposals from 13 major consortia. Bolloré Group was selected for the quality of its proposal which complemented the public transport network, its strong track record – 6 years of successful implementation in Paris, and its commitment to Singapore.

On June 30, 2016, Singapore and the Bolloré Group signed the agreement that demonstrated the Group’s commitment to fully support Singapore’s public transport policy, through the creation of alternative and environmentally-friendly transportation solutions to the traditional car.

In December 2017, BlueSG car sharing service will officially be launched with an estimate of 30 stations and 80 Bluecars.

Under the agreement, the car-sharing programme will eventually include 500 stations equipped with 2,000 charging points. Of these, 20 per cent (or 400 charging points) will be for public use. The first fleet of Bluecars is also currently being commissioned in Singapore and will be part of the 1,000 strong EV fleet in the future.



THE BLUESG TECHNOLOGY


BlueSG is offering a one-way and all-electric car sharing service thanks to its Bluecar vehicle equipped with Lithium Metal Polymer (LMP®) batteries from Blue Solutions, a Bolloré subsidiary as BlueSG.

LMP® technology is the culmination of an ambitious research and development program started more than twenty years ago. Made of thin films of material produced using extrusion techniques perfected by the Bolloré Group, LMP® batteries offer high energy density while ensuring safety of use. They provide unrivaled autonomy and excellent performance in all weather conditions. They are dry batteries (meaning “entirely solid”), which gives them numerous advantages, particularly in terms of safety. Solid electrolytes effectively reduce local pollution risks in the event of an accident or damage to the integrity of the battery pack. The LMP® batteries contain no solvents, no rare earth metals, and no cobalt.

These batteries can fulfill the needs of many different markets and meet the two primary challenges of the energy transition: developing clean transportation and smart energy management. Blue Solutions holds the intellectual property rights allowing it to manufacture and market batteries based on LMP® technology.
 

OUR AMBITIONS IN SINGAPORE

Thanks to the LMP® technology, the Bolloré Group decided to develop mobility (car sharing and electric vehicles) and stationary applications to address the environmental concerns. The Group ambition is to go further in the development of electro mobile solutions in particular thanks to its subsidiary that opened its new office in Singapore in September 2017.

Indeed, in addition to the fleet of 100% electric cars and charging points, the Bolloré Group is also establishing a new R&D center for Asia in Singapore, and an innovation center for partners to develop, test, and implement technological innovations in the mobility, data analysis and batteries.

Finally, the Bolloré Group also aims to deploy in the city-state and in Asia other modes of public transport, such as the Bluebus and the Bluetram equipped with supercapacitors. All of these would help create over 250 jobs in the country.

https://www.bluesg.com.sg/about-us
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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #78 on: January 18, 2018, 03:27:34 pm »


Tesla’s Battery in Australia Is Surpassing Expectations

January 17, 2018

By Dylan McConnell


It’s just over one month since the Hornsdale Power Reserve was officially opened in South Australia at the Hornsdale wind farm. The excitement surrounding the project has generated acres of media interest, both locally and abroad.

The aspect that has generated the most interest is the battery’s rapid response time in smoothing out several major energy outages that have occurred since it was installed.

Following the early success of the South Australia model, Victoria has also secured an agreement to get its own Tesla battery built near the town of Stawell. Victoria’s government will be tracking the Hornsdale battery’s early performance with interest.

Generation and Consumption

Since there are losses associated with energy storage, it is a net consumer of energy. This is often described in terms of “round trip efficiency,” a measure of the energy out to the energy in. In this case, the round trip efficiency appears to be roughly 80 percent.

The figure below shows the input and output from the battery over the month. As can be seen, on several occasions the battery has generated as much as 100 MW of power, and consumed 70 MW of power. The regular operation of the battery moves between generating 30 MW and consuming 30 MW of power.

Over the full month of December, the Hornsdale power reserve generated 2.42 GWh of energy, and consumed 3.06 GWh.

As can be seen, the generation and consumption pattern is rather “noisy,” and doesn’t really appear to have a pattern at all. This is true even on a daily basis, as can be seen below. This is related to services provided by the battery.

Generation and consumption of the Hornsdale Power Reserve over the month of December 2018. Author provided [data from AEMO]


Frequency Control Ancillary Services

There are eight different Frequency Control Ancillary Services (FCAS) markets in the National Electricity Market (NEM). These can be put into two broad categories: contingency services and regulation services.

Contingency Services

Contingency services essentially stabilize the system when something unexpected occurs. These are called credible contingencies. The tripping (isolation from the grid) of large generator is one example.

When such unexpected events occur, supply and demand are no longer balanced, and the frequency of the power system moves away from the normal operating range. This happens on a very short timescale. The contingency services ensure that the system is brought back into balance and that the frequency is returned to normal within five minutes.

In the NEM there are three separate timescales over which these contingency services should be delivered: six seconds, 60 seconds, and five minutes. As the service may have to increase or decrease the frequency, there is thus a total of six contingency markets (three that raise frequency in the timescales above, and three that reduce it).

This is usually done by rapidly increasing or decreasing output from a generator (or battery in this case), or rapidly reducing or increasing load. This response is triggered at the power station by the change in frequency.

To do this, generators (or loads) have some of their capacity “enabled” in the FCAS market. This essentially means that a proportion of its capacity is set aside, and available to respond if the frequency changes. Providers get paid for the amount of megawatts they have enabled in the FCAS market.

This is one of the services that the Hornsdale Power Reserve has been providing. The figure below shows how the Hornsdale Power Reserve responded to one incident on power outage, when one of the units at Loy Yang A tripped on December 14, 2017.

Regulation Services

The regulation services are a bit different. Similar to the contingency services, they help maintain the frequency in the normal operating range. And like contingency, regulation may have to raise or lower the frequency, and as such there are two regulation markets.

However, unlike contingency services, which essentially wait for an unexpected change in frequency, the response is governed by a control signal, sent from the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO).

In essence, AEMO controls the throttle, monitors the system frequency, and sends a control signal out at a four-second interval. This control signal alters the output of the generator such that the supply and demand balanced is maintained.

This is one of the main services that the battery has been providing. As can be seen, the output of the battery closely follows the amount of capacity it has enabled in the regulation market.

The Hornsdale Power Reserve responding to a drop in system frequency. Author provide [data from AEMO']


More Batteries to Come   

Not to be outdone by its neighboring state, the Victorian government has also recently secured an agreement for its own Tesla battery. This agreement, in conjunction with a wind farm near the town of Stawell, should see a battery providing similar services in Victoria.

This battery may also provide additional benefits to the grid. The project is located in a part of the transmission network that AEMO has indicated may need augmentation in the future. This project might illustrate the benefits the batteries can provide in strengthening the transmission network.

It’s still early days for the Hornsdale Power Reserve, but it’s clear that it has been busy performing essential services and doing so at impressive speeds. Importantly, it has provided regular frequency control ancillary services — not simply shifting electricity around.

With the costs and need for frequency control service increasing in recent years, the boost to supply through the Hornsdale Power Reserve is good news for consumers, and a timely addition to Australia’s energy market.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Lead image credit: CC0 Creative Commons | Pixabay

http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2018/01/tesla-s-battery-in-australia-is-surpassing-expectations.html

Agelbert NOTE:For smoothing electrical energy demand and preventing appliance damaging frequency and voltage fluctuations, no fossil fuel or nuclear power generating plant can EVER match the lightning speed and reliability of a large battery system.

The only thing that comes close, but still takes seconds (causing brief frequency and voltage fluctuations that you don't notice but your electronics certainly do not like), instead of the lightning fast battery response of fractions of a second, is hydroelectric power because valves can quickly force torrents of water through pelton wheels powering electricity generators.

Battery systems are the Renewable Energy smoothing solution to the problem of intermittent solar, wind, tide, hydro, etc. because they provide an added guarantee of uninterrupted clean power that totally eliminates the need for alleged "baseload" coal or nuclear AND natural gas super expensive peaking power plants.

This has been known by the fossil fuelers for at least a half a century. That is why they continue to do everything they can to stop these systems from coming online. We need fossil fuel and nuclear dirty energy sources like  like a dog needs ticks.  >:(

If we survive the present Trumpism dystopic stupidity, I believe all the excess Renewable Energy harvested from facilities that are being built all over the world will eventually be stored, not just in battery systems and dams, but also in potential energy systems (massive cable suspended weights in subterranean structures up to a thousand feet long) that can kinetically power generators by gravity even faster than hydroelectric power.

Many people do not realize that, at present, a great deal of generated energy by fossil fuel and nuclear power is thrown away in what is called "shunting". As you read in the article above, a certain amount of power capacity HAS TO be kept off line so that when a demand spike shows up, the frequency and voltage do not get out of acceptable limits.

All this is because conventional polluting power sources like coal and nuclear are TOO SLOW in the ramp up and ramp down. 

Also, those peaking power plants that use natural gas are, though much quicker, still too slow to avoid the huge amounts of shunted energy thown away routinely.

Renewable Energy and battery systems have the potential to reduce shunting to a fraction of what it is today and eventually eliminate this wasteful process altogether. Fossil Fuelers and Nuke Pukes don't like to talk about shunting because, aside from the polluting piggery , Shunting is their horrendously wasteful Achilles Heel.

In the future, I envision large battery systems as mainly a smoothing technology used to coordinate all the Renewable Energy coming in and storing it when there is an excess, while providing millisecond smooth frequency and voltage instant power until the hydroelectric and/or gravity systems come online a second or three later.  The present six seconds, 60 seconds, and five minutes time scales will be relegated to the cave man days of fossil fuel and nuclear polluting energy sources.  ;D

There is no place for slow starting dirty energy generation in this truly practical and sustainable picture involving supplying clean, non-polluting power to human civilization.

The Fossil Fuelers DID THE Clean Energy  Inventions suppressing, Climate Trashing, human health depleting CRIME,   but since they have ALWAYS BEEN liars and conscience free crooks, they are trying to AVOID   DOING THE TIME or     PAYING THE FINE!     Don't let them get away with it! Pass it on!   
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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #79 on: February 06, 2018, 03:23:48 pm »
Tesla’s giant battery in Australia is already eating away at ‘gas 🦖 cartel’s’ profits, report says

Fred Lambert

- Feb. 6th 2018 8:28 am ET

@FredericLambert

FEATURE
 
106 Comments
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We already reported on how Tesla’s giant battery in Australia made around $1 million in just a few days by taking advantage of the country’s volatile energy market.

But now a new report shows how it is also eating away at the ‘gas cartel’s’ profits.

Home Solar Power


When an issue happens or maintenance is required on the power grid in Australia, the Energy Market Operator calls for FCAS (frequency control and ancillary services) which consists of large and costly gas generators🦖 kicking in to compensate for the loss of power.

These services are so costly that it can sometimes amount to up to $7 million per day – or 10 times the regular value of the energy delivered.

Electricity rates can be seen reaching $14,000 per MW during those FCAS periods.

Now Renewecomy reports that FCAS were required on January 14, but the prices didn’t skyrocket to $14,000 per MW and they instead were maintained at around $270/MW after a short spike.

The bidding of Tesla’s 100MW/ 129MWh Powerpack project in South Australia on the services is credited with escaping the price hike, which would have cost energy generator and consumers millions in costs.

The Powerpack system is able to switch from charging to discharging in a fraction of a second, which allows Neoen, the operator of the system, to quickly respond when frequency issues happen.

Ed McManus, the CEO of Meridian Australia and Powershop Australia, told Renewecomy about the situation on the Energy Insiders podcast:

Quote
“If you look at FCAS … the costs traditionally in South Australia have been high …. and our costs in the last couple of years have gone from low five-figures annually to low six-figures annually. It’s a hell of a jump,”

“That plays into the thinking of new players looking to come into South Australia to challenge the incumbents. FCAS charges are on their minds.

“It’s a little early to tell, but it looks like from preliminary data looks that the Tesla big battery is having an impact on FCAS costs, bringing them down … that is a very, very significant development for generation investment and generation competition in South Australia.

“The South Australian government deserves a big pat on the back …. they have received a fair bit of flack – people saying if the power goes out, the battery can only power state for 5 minutes – but that is kind of irrelevant.

“The battery is there to do other things … and it looks like it has been phenomenally successful in doing that.”

The government didn’t wait for a pat on the back and it instead quickly contracted Tesla for another giant energy storage project;D

We reported this weekend that Tesla will be installing Powerwalls and solar power on 50,000 homes to create the biggest virtual power plant in the world.

The project would result in 250 MW and 650 MWh of capacity, which could also be used for similar services as Tesla’s giant Powerpack installation but distributed in residential communities.

https://electrek.co/2018/02/06/tesla-giant-battery-australia-gas-cartels-profit-report/

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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #80 on: February 08, 2018, 12:20:17 pm »


Compound Could Transform Energy Storage ⚡ for Large Grids

February 7, 2018

By Bob Marcotte

energy storage

Ellen Matson, left, assistant professor of chemistry, and PhD student Lauren VanGelder at work in Matson's lab. VanGelder is lead author on a paper describing modifications to a redox flow battery that make it nearly twice as effective for electrochemical energy storage. Credit: University of Rochester | Matson Lab
         
In order to power entire communities with clean energy, such as solar and wind power, a reliable backup storage system is needed to provide energy when the sun isn’t shining and the wind doesn’t blow.

One possibility is to use any excess solar- and wind-based energy to charge solutions of chemicals that can subsequently be stored for use when sunshine and wind are scarce. At that time, the chemical solutions of opposite charge can be pumped across solid electrodes, thus creating an electron exchange that provides power to the electrical grid.

The key to this technology, called a redox flow battery , is finding chemicals that can not only “carry” sufficient charge, but also be stored without degrading for long periods, thereby maximizing power generation and minimizing the costs of replenishing the system.

University of Rochester researchers, working with colleagues at the University at Buffalo, believe they have found a promising compound that could transform the energy storage landscape.

In a paper published in Chemical Science, an open access journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry, researchers in the lab of Ellen Matson, assistant professor of chemistry, describe modifying a metal-oxide cluster, which has promising electroactive properties, so that it is nearly twice as effective as the unmodified cluster for electrochemical energy storage in a redox flow battery.

“Energy storage applications with polyoxometalates are pretty rare in the literature,” says lead author Lauren VanGelder, a third-year PhD student in Matson’s lab. “There are maybe one or two examples prior to ours, and they didn’t really maximize the potential of these systems.”

“This is really an untapped area of molecular development 💫,” adds Matson.

A redox flow battery uses excess solar- and wind-based energy to charge solutions of chemicals that can subsequently be stored for use when sunshine and wind are scarce. At that time, the chemical solutions of opposite charge can be pumped across solid electrodes, thus creating an electron exchange that provides power to the electrical grid. Credit: University of Rochester | Michael Osadciw

The cluster was first developed in the lab of German chemist Johann Spandl, and studied for its magnetic properties. Tests conducted by VanGelder showed that the compound could store charge in a redox flow battery, “but was not as stable as we had hoped.”

However, by making what Matson describes as “a simple molecular modification”— replacing the compound’s methanol-derived methoxide groups with ethanol-based ethoxide ligands—the team was able to expand the potential window during which the cluster was stable, doubling the amount of electrical energy that could be stored in the battery.

Says Matson: “What’s really cool about this work is the way we can generate the ethoxide and methoxide clusters by using methanol and ethanol. Both of these reagents are inexpensive, readily available and safe to use. The metal and oxygen atoms that compose the remainder of the cluster are earth-abundant elements. The straightforward, efficient synthesis of this system is a totally new direction in charge-carrier development that, we believe, will set a new standard in the field.”

The electrochemical testing required for this study involved equipment and techniques not previously used in the Matson lab. Hence the collaboration with Timothy Cook, assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Buffalo, and Anjula Kosswattaarachchi, a fourth-year graduate student in the Cook lab. VanGelder visited the Cook lab for training on testing equipment, and in turn helped Kosswattaarachchi with synthesizing compounds.

The two groups have applied for a National Science Foundation grant as part of an ongoing collaboration to further refine the clusters for use in commercial redox flow batteries.

Matson stressed the “crucial role” played by VanGelder, who conducted the initial testing and experiments on the clusters while Matson was on maternity leave. “As a third-year graduate student, she did an incredible job of starting this project. She’s played an important role in driving this research effort in the lab,” Matson says.

A University Furth Fund Award that Matson received last year enabled the lab to purchase electrochemical equipment needed for the study. Patrick Forrestal ’19 of the Matson lab also contributed to the study.

http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2018/02/compound-could-transform-energy-storage-for-large-grids.html
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Re: Batteries
« Reply #81 on: February 21, 2018, 06:58:19 pm »


Puerto Rico School Ditches Grid for Solar-plus-Storage 

February 19, 2018

By Chris Martin, Bloomberg

http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/articles/2018/02/puerto-rico-school-ditches-grid-for-solar-plus-storage.html
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Re: Batteries
« Reply #82 on: February 22, 2018, 02:31:38 pm »
 

Soft, eel-inspired device can produce up to 110 volts

LAST UPDATED ON FEBRUARY 22ND, 2018 AT 6:06 PM BY MIHAI ANDREI


Article with above video:

https://www.zmescience.com/medicine/eel-device-electric-22022018/
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Re: Batteries
« Reply #83 on: March 09, 2018, 08:43:57 pm »
The Battery ⚡ Will Kill Fossil Fuels🦕 —It's Only a Matter of Time

By Mark Chediak from Hyperdrive

March 8, 2018, 7:00 AM EST Updated on March 8, 2018, 11:16 AM EST


SNIPPET:

Three weeks ago, a U.S. agency ⁉️ sent the clearest signal yet that fossil fuels’ days are numbered.   

Full article with graphics:



https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-03-08/the-battery-will-kill-fossil-fuels-it-s-only-a-matter-of-time
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Re: Batteries
« Reply #84 on: March 09, 2018, 10:37:25 pm »
Quote
“‘We’re reaching an inflection point,” said Steve Westly, founder of sustainability venture-capital firm Westly Group and former controller and chief fiscal officer for the state of California. “In the future, people will talk about energy in terms of kilowatts per hour instead of oil per barrels.”

"Kilowatts per hour" and "oil per barrels"??? - please explain.

Ask Steve Westly.  I didn't write  article but I have an idea 🤔 of what he is referring too. The unit of measure the Oil Corporations moved into general parlance was the "Barrel" (about 55 gallons of whatever) instead of just using a term relating to a gallon. The whole sneaky idea was to make everyone equate "Energy" with "Oil", as if one can only "really" get energy from a barrel of YOU KNOW WHAT .

You know the fossil fuelers LOVE to say the USA NEEDS umpteen million Barrels of Oil per day or week or month or year or whatever. That is OUT THE WINDOW when your source of energy is renewable AND stored in a massive utility corporation battery bank.

I know you think that isn't going to happen any time soon. Good luck with that.  ::)



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Re: Batteries
« Reply #85 on: March 10, 2018, 03:02:38 pm »
Quote
“‘We’re reaching an inflection point,” said Steve Westly, founder of sustainability venture-capital firm Westly Group and former controller and chief fiscal officer for the state of California. “In the future, people will talk about energy in terms of kilowatts per hour instead of oil per barrels.”

"Kilowatts per hour" and "oil per barrels"??? - please explain.

Ask Steve Westly.  I didn't write  article but I have an idea 🤔 of what he is referring too. The unit of measure the Oil Corporations moved into general parlance was the "Barrel" (about 55 gallons of whatever) instead of just using a term relating to a gallon. The whole sneaky idea was to make everyone equate "Energy" with "Oil", as if one can only "really" get energy from a barrel of YOU KNOW WHAT  :evil4:.

You know the fossil fuelers LOVE to say the USA NEEDS umpteen million Barrels of Oil per day or week or month or year or whatever. That is OUT THE WINDOW when your source of energy is renewable AND stored in a massive utility corporation battery bank.

I know you think that isn't going to happen any time soon. Good luck with that.  ::)


I think I have an idea of what he was refering to, too:
"kilowatts per hour" is an error.  He meant "kilowatt.hours" which actually has the units of energy .
"oil per barrels" is another error.  He meant "barrels of oil", which actually has the units of energy.

I suppose Steve Westly, founder of sustainability venture-capital firm Westly Group and former controller and chief fiscal officer for the state of California, could have got it right and been misquoted by the journalist, Mark Chediak.  But you would think Bloomberg would have done a better job of checking the story than that.  Also, 45% turns into "more than half".

It's all spin anyway, not to worry.


 ::) Hey Einstein, the guy was NOT goiing into energy math thermodynamics nomenclature! He was talking about public perceptions of energy that would soon go the way of the dodo bird!

But, of course, I knew you would try to spin it as an "error" with your typical hair splitting deliberate intransigence, disguised as providing some pedantic (and defamatory as well as boring) bit of enlightenment. Get a life, Palloy. Oil is NOT "it". Please refrain from defamatory remarks about Bloomberg, it's journalists, or Steve Westly, Such unwarranted spurious remarks only further undermine your already tarnished credibility. 

Here's a Scientist Mathematician that  people who actually understand bisophere math, the Nature Conservancy, respect. As a mathematician, you could learn much from a serious study of the program he developed called "Marxan" to help in the conservation of the biodiversity in our biosphere.

The Nature Conservancy 🦋

March 10, 2018

Meet Our Chief Scientist 👨‍🔬

For The Nature Conservancy’s chief scientist, Dr. Hugh Possingham, a gift in his youth helped guide his path in the field of conservation. Learn what inspires him and share in his reflections on the Conservancy’s successes around the globe.

You grew up in South Australia. How did your childhood experiences shape your career?

As a child, my father and I would explore the bush around Adelaide. He was a keen birder, and when I was 12 he gave me the book “Competition and the Structure of Bird Communities,” written by Martin Cody, which showed me that mathematics was useful—even in ecology. This realization led to my pursuit of applied math at university.


You used mathematics to develop Marxan, the world’s most widely used conservation planning tool. Is that how you got involved with the Conservancy?

I developed a lot of relationships with Conservancy colleagues through Marxan’s application to their work, so I was very familiar with our science-based, collaborative approach and clear focus to save as much of our planet’s biodiversity as possible. It is somewhat unusual for someone like myself to leave the academic world, and I don’t think I would have accepted a position with any other conservation organization.


Which types of conservation strategies do you find most encouraging?

Much of our core work is focused on reducing habitat loss and degradation, which is essential for halting climate change and saving biodiversity. For example, with a quarter of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions caused by forest loss, there is great potential in sustainable forestry initiatives. Projects like these are especially promising because they are good for the economy, good for nature and good for mitigating climate change.


Can you give some examples of how the Conservancy tackles big conservation challenges?

We look at how to generate renewable power while improving wildlife habitat; how to use habitat restoration in cities to provide cleaner water; how to lessen the impacts of climate change by restoring natural infrastructure, like coral reefs.


Why is the Conservancy so effective?

Our organization is unique because we are global problem solvers, and we are exceptionally inclusive and collaborative in our work. We recognize that people have basic needs—food, energy, clean water, sanitation—hence calling a halt to development isn’t an option. So we align with many stakeholders—from governments and corporations to farmers and indigenous communities—and we work with them to find solutions that meet human needs and improve biodiversity

The Nature Conservancy
Attn: Treasury
4245 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 100
Arlington, VA 22203 USA

By Phone:
(800) 628-6860

Biodiversity hot spots of 80% of biosphere's species endangered by Global Warming Pollution
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AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #86 on: March 11, 2018, 12:06:32 am »
Bloomberg/Westly was trying to explain something to the public, and got it horribly garbled. You posted it as something good.  They deserve my criticism.  At least you (hopefully) won't go around saying  “In the future, people will talk about energy in terms of kilowatts per hour instead of oil per barrels.”

You don't believe in Peak Oil, I do. That's called a disagreement.  It doesn't give you the right to disparage me without pointing out the errors in Peak Oil, which you have never done and cannot do because it is real. The only person that is weakened by this error is YOU.

Conservancy is not effective, it is being steam-rollered into the ground by big business, as shown by your "biodiversity problems still outstanding" image.  "calling a halt to development isn’t an option." is where they go wrong, and when dealing with "governments and corporations to farmers and indigenous communities" with that attitude, they will always lose.


 

"Horribly garbled"? My, what ridiculous hyperbole. I understood what he was saying just fine, thank you. YOU were the one claiming a news item for the public should follow thermodynamic energy measurement rigor. That's really grasping at straws, Palloy. 👎 Stop with the Kwh thing. Anybody knows what that is all about. It just bends you out of shape to read any article that says oil is going to be replaced by renewably sourced energy from batteries, so you start a hair splitting hyperbole campaign. Same on you!

And BY THE WAY, you CAN use up X number of Kilowatts in a given second, minute or hour, AS YOU KNOW, but the Kwh measure is what they use to bill you for the electricity, so stop playing silly games with nomenclature!

And now you are attacking The Nature Conservancy and their Chief Scientist mathematician too?

You just canot take correction gracefully, can you?

And as to Peak Oil, I HAVE pointed out the MANY errors in peak oil, over and over. You just keep ignoring them! HERE are some of the most recent examples:

Quote
by Marianna Parraga (Reuters) – Mexico’s state-run Pemex [PEMX.UL] might bring partners into two heavy crude oilfields in the Gulf’s shallow waters, the company’s chief said on Tuesday, move that could help ease a lack of heavy barrels in the Atlantic basin.

After nine bidding rounds in just three years and a presidential election scheduled in July, Mexico’s oil regulator has started a campaign to convince Pemex and foreign investors that this is the moment to develop much needed extra-heavy oil reserves.

“We are looking to increase production, including heavy crude, so we might put on the table some farmouts mainly for those fields that need secondary recovery strategies,” Pemex’s CEO Carlos Trevino said during a news conference during the CERAWeek energy conference in Houston.

Quote
Dominican Republic to Join Caribbean Energy 🦖 Exploration Rush

By Bloomberg on Mar 06, 2018 04:11 pm


Quote
BY JOHN BOWDEN - 03/06/18 08:42 AM EST 
   
Trump touts report US is set to become world’s top oil producer

President Trump on Tuesday celebrated a report from the International Energy Agency which claims the U.S. will become the world's leading oil producer by 2023.

AND HERE is the article that SHOULD have put to rest in your mind  any idea that peak oil will save us from Catastrophic Climate Change:


"Peak Oil will save us from Climate Change:" a meme that never went viral

By Ugo Bardi

Thursday, October 8, 2015

The idea that peak oil will save us from climate change has been occasionally popping up in the debate, but it never really gained traction for a number of good reasons. One is that, in many cases, the proponents were also climate science deniers and that made them scarcely credible. Indeed, if climate change does not exist (or if it is not caused by human activities), then how is it that you are telling us that peak oil will save us from it? Add to this that many hard line climate science deniers are also peak oil deniers (since, as well known, both concepts are part of the great conspiracy), then, it is no surprise that the meme of "peak oil will save us" never went viral.

That doesn't mean that we shouldn't ask the question of whether we have sufficient amounts of fossil fuel to generate a truly disastrous climate change. The debate on this point goes back to the early 2000s. At the beginning, the data were uncertain and it was correctly noted that some of the IPCC scenarios overestimated what we are likely to burn in the future. But, by now, I think the fog has cleared.  It is becoming increasingly clear that fossil fuel depletion is not enough, by far, to save us from climate change.

Nevertheless, some people still cling to the old "peak oil will save us" meme. In a recent post on "Energy Matters", Roger Andrews   argues that:

All of the oil and gas reserves plus about 20% of the coal reserves could be consumed without exceeding the IPCC’s trillion-tonne carbon emissions limit. 


Now, that sounds reassuring and surely many people would understand it in the sense that we shouldn't worry at all about burning oil and gas. Unfortunately, that's just not true and Andrews' statement is both overoptimistic and misleading.

One problem is that the "2 degrees limit" is a last ditch attempt to limit the damage created by climate change, but there is no certainty that staying beyond it will be enough to prevent disaster.


Then, there is a problem with Andrew's use of the term "reserves," to be understood as "proven reserves". Proven reserves include only those resources that are known to exist and to be extractable at present; and that's surely much less than all what could be extracted in the future. The parameter that takes into account also probably existing resources is called "Ultimate Recoverable Resources" or URRs

So, let's consider a world fossil URR estimate that many people would consider as "pessimistic," the one by Jean Laherrere that I already discussed in a previous post.

It turns out that we have enough oil and gas that, together, they can produce enough CO2 to reach the 2 degrees limit; even though, maybe, not more. There follows that, if we really wanted to burn all the oil and gas known to be extractable, to stay withing the limit we would need to stop burning coal - zero burning, zilch -  starting from tomorrow!
Not an easy thing to do, considering that coal produces more than 40% of the energy that powers the world's electrical grid and, in some countries, much more than that. It is true that coal is the dirtiest of the three fossil fuels and must be phased out faster than oil and gas, but the consumption of all three must go down together, otherwise it will be impossible to remain under the limit.

In the end, we have here one more of the many illusions that surround the climate issue; one that could be dangerous it were to spread. However, in addition to the other problems described here, Andrew's post falls into the same trap of many previous attempts: it uses the data produced by climate science to try to demonstrate its main thesis, but only after having defined climate science as "Vodoo Science." No way: this is not a meme that will go viral.

http://cassandralegacy.blogspot.it/2015/04/climate-change-can-seneca-collapse-save.html


Mr. Palloy,

The only disparaging and thoroughly offensive commenter on this forum lacking the most basic level of respect and decorum, in regard to your consistent hyperbole, hair splitting and obtuse deliberate misinterpretation of the most basic phrases in the English language is YOU. From the start, you have consistently and abusively attacked absolutely everything I have written about, from ethanol to predicted wave activity to the massive level of pollution from fossil fuels that is what is REALLY destroying human civilization. The fact that you "BELIEVE" in peak oil causing a "collapse" gives you ZERO excuse to get into high dungeon because I vigorously, and with many irrefutable data points, give you no credit for rational thinking. You think I am wrong. I know you are the one that is woefully wrong. After you accused me of being "in a panic" and being "alone" in my views on this forum, both Eddie and Jdwheeler weighed in to to support my position. Eddie give both of us equal credit, but JD made it rather clear to YOU that my argument was the most important one. YET, you did not apologize for attempting to disparage my view as some " alarmist fantasy". DON'T tell me YOU are the one being offended when you routinely dish out thoroughly demeaning and offensive remarks directed at my posts and my person.

HERE is what JD wrote to YOU, which I answered since you disappeared, so you can stick it in your peak oil pipe and SMOKE IT!

The thing to panic about is Peak Oil because its impact is just about to crash the world economy and prevent any kind of industrial reboot.
You're right about the impact of Peak Oil, but Biosphere Disruption (aka Climate Change) can cause the extinction of most complex lifeforms on Earth, so it is a far bigger problem.

Also, Peak Oil is completely unavoidable, all we can do it change the timing a little one way or the other, and brace ourselves for the impact.  While Biosphere Disruption has already begun, we still have at least in theory the ability to avoid the worst effects.

Really, though, it is a false dilemma.  The good solutions for Peak Oil also happen to be the good solutions for Biosphere Disruption.  They just are bad for continuing a BAU consumerist lifestyle.


Thank you for your serious and well reasoned comment. I understand that you see this as six of one and half a dozen of the other, but there is a key issue here that negates the "peak oil will save us" meme as an excuse to keep buring fossi lfuels until they are all used up.

...

JD, if you haven't perused this detailed study by David Wasdell, I recommend it. It clearly shows the climate sensitivity (radiative forcing) is much higher than the low balled IPCC scenario model math.


...

http://www.apollo-gaia.org/harsh-realities-of-now.html
I see it more of a six-of-one, half-a-gross of the other situation... or in other words, a proper response to climate change will make peak oil irrelevant.  As David Wasdell puts it at the end of the above article,

"It is time to say NO to the dark and toxic energy of the underworld. It is time to say YES to the pure and sustainable energy of light. Photo-dynamics can out-power, out-pace and out-resource any amount of energy we can get from fossil sources. It is time to break free from our bondage to the past. It is time to embrace the freedom of the Sun. It is time to usher in the dawn of Solar Society.

The transition from fossil dependency to solar dependency is an extraordinary shift for our species. It can be compared to the introduction of photosynthesis in the evolution of plants, which could then take solar energy to transform basic chemicals into more complex molecules. Today we are able to take solar energy and transform it directly into electricity, power, heat, and light. That provides the basis for a metamorphosis. We are not caught in the death throes of civilisation, merely the demise of an inappropriate mode of civilisation. We are experiencing the birth pangs of a new form of humanity."

Now THAT is what is called respecful posting, something I have YET to see from you. It is IRRESPONSIBLE and downright SHAMEFUL that you claimed nobody supported my views and then ignored the posts supporting my views!

Palloy, you show ZERO RESPECT for me and what I post. You NEVER give me or my posts the benefit of the doubt, but jump in to snipe and dispargage without regard to manners or decorum. You REFUSE to peruse David Wasdell's detailed and methodical study. YOU are the one who cannot deal with evidence and hard facts! Therefore it is a waste of time to engage you in any discussion. Respect is a two way street. I am NOT your verbal punching bag. When, and if, you show respect for my posts, I will reciprocate. Until then I hold you and everything you write in contempt. DO NOT POST HERE if you cannot disagree respectfully with what I write. Apologize or go away!
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Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #87 on: March 14, 2018, 05:50:38 pm »
Blue Planet Energy Supplies Energy Storage & Training In Puerto Rico
 


March 14th, 2018 by Jake Richardson

The energy storage provider Blue Planet Energy recently deployed its Blue Ion energy storage systems to support the electrification efforts in Puerto Rico.

Image Credit: Blue Planet Energy

These deployments took place in areas where there has not been reliable electricity since September of 2017, when Hurricane Maria struck. One site is a volunteer housing facility in the Isabela municipality and the other is located in the Corozal municipality to provide electricity to a clean water pumping system. Blue Planet Energy is also providing support through training and education sessions.


Too many of Puerto Rico’s residents have not had a functioning electric grid since Hurricane Maria’s landfall in September. Our Blue Ion units will provide critical sites with reliable, safe and self-sustained power to ensure they can continue providing essential services to their communities. We’re proud to be able to lend our support to Puerto Rico and to contribute to its mission of rebuilding with stronger, cleaner and more reliable energy infrastructure,” said Henk Rogers, Blue Planet Energy CEO and founder.

A 16 kilowatt-hour (kWh) Blue Ion 2.0 battery unit was installed at the well pumping system in Corozal. The energy storage technology is working with a 7 kW solar power system in a remote neighborhood called Palos Blanco. This area was experiencing a lack of both clean water and reliable electricity, so the solar power and energy storage system is helping to produce both.

“Our mission on the ground in Puerto Rico is to coordinate with the EPA and FEMA to install safe drinking water stations and solar-powered pumping systems to service those that need it most, ” explained Mark Baker, Director of Disaster Response for Water Mission. This organization is working to address water safety in many rural communities in Puerto Rico.

Another 16 kWh Blue Ion system was deployed at the Las Dunas volunteer center. This facility supports aid workers who are installing solar power kits by providing them with housing and assistance. Up to 15 volunteers can be housed there, but the structure was without power until the new system was deployed.

“Partnering with Blue Planet Energy has helped to supply reliable power for our base operations, allowing us to meet our mission of deploying solar kits to areas hardest hit by Maria,” explained Walter Meyer-Rodriguez the Coastal Marine Resource Center project lead.

In fact, CMRC has plans to add over 100 more solar power + energy storage systems in under-served areas of Puerto Rico.

Blue Planet Energy also sponsored the Puerto Rico Solar Energy Industries Association’s inaugural Clean Energy Summit in San Juan in February to address how energy storage could help in the island’s recovery.

“Being on the ground in Puerto Rico and speaking with people from communities impacted by Hurricane Maria, we’ve seen firsthand the risk that centralized power systems pose and the hardship they can leave in the wake of a devastating weather event. The Blue Planet Energy team is thrilled to pass on the knowledge and tools for reliable, well-designed off-grid power so that Puerto Ricans can rebuild their communities,” stated Blue Planet Energy’s Vice President of Engineering Kyle Bolger.

The Blue Ion off-grid ferrous phosphate battery system has products at 8 kWh, 16 kWh, and a much larger option that can be scaled up to 450 kWh.

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/03/14/blue-planet-energy-supplies-energy-storage-training-puerto-rico/

Agelbert COMMENT: I applaud storage techology. This will help Puerto Ricans get off the profit over planet treadmill of fossil fuel 😈 energy price gouging for good!
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #88 on: March 15, 2018, 12:54:23 pm »
Blue Planet Energy Supplies Energy Storage & Training In Puerto Rico
 


March 14th, 2018 by Jake Richardson

The energy storage provider Blue Planet Energy recently deployed its Blue Ion energy storage systems to support the electrification efforts in Puerto Rico.

Image Credit: Blue Planet Energy

These deployments took place in areas where there has not been reliable electricity since September of 2017, when Hurricane Maria struck. One site is a volunteer housing facility in the Isabela municipality and the other is located in the Corozal municipality to provide electricity to a clean water pumping system. Blue Planet Energy is also providing support through training and education sessions.


Too many of Puerto Rico’s residents have not had a functioning electric grid since Hurricane Maria’s landfall in September. Our Blue Ion units will provide critical sites with reliable, safe and self-sustained power to ensure they can continue providing essential services to their communities. We’re proud to be able to lend our support to Puerto Rico and to contribute to its mission of rebuilding with stronger, cleaner and more reliable energy infrastructure,” said Henk Rogers, Blue Planet Energy CEO and founder.

A 16 kilowatt-hour (kWh) Blue Ion 2.0 battery unit was installed at the well pumping system in Corozal. The energy storage technology is working with a 7 kW solar power system in a remote neighborhood called Palos Blanco. This area was experiencing a lack of both clean water and reliable electricity, so the solar power and energy storage system is helping to produce both.

“Our mission on the ground in Puerto Rico is to coordinate with the EPA and FEMA to install safe drinking water stations and solar-powered pumping systems to service those that need it most, ” explained Mark Baker, Director of Disaster Response for Water Mission. This organization is working to address water safety in many rural communities in Puerto Rico.

Another 16 kWh Blue Ion system was deployed at the Las Dunas volunteer center. This facility supports aid workers who are installing solar power kits by providing them with housing and assistance. Up to 15 volunteers can be housed there, but the structure was without power until the new system was deployed.

“Partnering with Blue Planet Energy has helped to supply reliable power for our base operations, allowing us to meet our mission of deploying solar kits to areas hardest hit by Maria,” explained Walter Meyer-Rodriguez the Coastal Marine Resource Center project lead.

In fact, CMRC has plans to add over 100 more solar power + energy storage systems in under-served areas of Puerto Rico.

Blue Planet Energy also sponsored the Puerto Rico Solar Energy Industries Association’s inaugural Clean Energy Summit in San Juan in February to address how energy storage could help in the island’s recovery.

“Being on the ground in Puerto Rico and speaking with people from communities impacted by Hurricane Maria, we’ve seen firsthand the risk that centralized power systems pose and the hardship they can leave in the wake of a devastating weather event. The Blue Planet Energy team is thrilled to pass on the knowledge and tools for reliable, well-designed off-grid power so that Puerto Ricans can rebuild their communities,” stated Blue Planet Energy’s Vice President of Engineering Kyle Bolger.

The Blue Ion off-grid ferrous phosphate battery system has products at 8 kWh, 16 kWh, and a much larger option that can be scaled up to 450 kWh.

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/03/14/blue-planet-energy-supplies-energy-storage-training-puerto-rico/

Agelbert COMMENT: I applaud storage techology. This will help Puerto Ricans get off the profit over planet treadmill of fossil fuel 😈 energy price gouging for good!
It really is a great product.  We are a dealer for them. The lithium iron phosphate cell has great potential...
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Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

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Re: Batteries
« Reply #89 on: March 15, 2018, 12:57:56 pm »
It really is a great product.  We are a dealer for them. The lithium iron phosphate cell has great potential...

How much do they cost?

RE



About 3 times the cost of a lead acid agm bank of the same capacity but should last 4 times longer. It's complicated though because each have strengths and weaknesses. It's a great product.

How much for the 8KwH version?

RE

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Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

 

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