+- +-

+-User

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

+-Stats ezBlock

Members
Total Members: 41
Latest: GWarnock
New This Month: 0
New This Week: 0
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 8452
Total Topics: 228
Most Online Today: 2
Most Online Ever: 52
(November 29, 2017, 04:04:44 am)
Users Online
Members: 0
Guests: 0
Total: 0

Author Topic: Geothermal Power  (Read 2323 times)

0 Members and 0 Guests are viewing this topic.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8257
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Geothermal Power
« Reply #30 on: February 15, 2016, 06:06:32 pm »
Midwestern geothermal greenhouse provides local citrus year round for $1 a day   

Melissa Breyer (@MelissaBreyer)
Science / Sustainable Agriculture
 February 12, 2016


Tiny tiger on the hunt in the tropics of a Nebraska Greenhouse


Greenhouse in the Snow, built by a former mailman, grows an abundance of local produce high on the Nebraska plains.


"We can grow the best citrus in the world, right here on the high plains,” says Russ Finch, the former mailman (pictured above) who is the creative superstar genius responsible for building the Greenhouse in the Snow. And he can do it spending only $1 a day in energy costs.   

For Midwesterners (and many of the rest of us) produce in the winter means things imported form warmer climes or grown in greenhouses, which typically have a prodigious hunger for energy and are fed by burning fossil fuels.

But by harnessing the Earth's natural internal heat to warm a greenhouse, oranges and other tropical treats thrive without the waste and pollution typically found in so much agriculture. Finch’s structure is a take on a walipini – a brilliant design that TreeHugger has written about (and which remains one of our most popular posts: Build a $300 underground greenhouse for year-round gardening).

As Grant Gerlock writes at NPR, the floor is dug 4 feet below the surface, the roof is slanted toward the south to harness as much sun as it can. In the daytime it can warm well into the 80s (F) inside, but at night the temperature drops, which is when the geothermal heat is called in.

Quote
"All we try to do is keep it above 28F degrees in the winter," Finch says. "We have no backup system for heat. The only heat source is the Earth's heat, at 52F degrees at 8-foot deep."

Which is good enough for the oranges, and all kinds of other delicacies.  ;D

"Any type of plant we saw, we would put it in and see what it could do. We didn't baby anything," Finch says. "We just put it in and if it died, it died. But most everything really grows well. We can grow practically any tropical plant."

"There have been hardly any successful 12-month greenhouses on the northern High Plains because of the weather," Finch adds. "The cost of energy is too high for it. But by tapping into the Earth's heat, we've been able to drastically reduce the cost."

Finch grows a few hundred pounds of fruit each year to sell at local farmers markets, notes Gerlock, but his main business is selling the design for his greenhouse in the snow. And while a new greenhouse costs $22,000 to build, the beauty of running them is kind of priceless. To date, 17 of his designs have been built in the U.S. and Canada – we hope to see many more.

Changing the world one orange-grown-in-the-winter-in-Nebraska at a time? Bring it on!   

Watch the charming Mr. FInch (and cat!   ) in a tour of the greenhouse in the video below.



http://www.treehugger.com...al-citrus-year-round.html
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8257
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Geothermal Power
« Reply #31 on: March 31, 2016, 03:16:03 pm »

David Suzuki: Tapping Earth’s Abundant Geothermal Energy

Dr. David Suzuki  | March 31, 2016 1:06 pm

In the midst of controversy over BC’s Peace River Site C dam project, the Canadian Geothermal Energy Association released a study showing the province could get the same amount of energy more affordably from geothermal sources for about half the construction costs. Unlike Site C, geothermal wouldn’t require massive transmission upgrades, would be less environmentally disruptive and would create more jobs throughout the province rather than just in one area.

Despite the many benefits of geothermal, Canada is the only “Pacific Ring of Fire” country that doesn’t use it for commercial-scale energy. According to DeSmogBlog, “New Zealand, Indonesia, the Philippines, the U.S. and Mexico all have commercial geothermal plants.”
Quote
Iceland heats up to 90 percent of its homes and supplies 25 percent of its electricity, with geothermal.

Geothermal energy is generated by heat from Earth’s rocks, liquids and steam. It can come from shallow ground, where the temperature is a steady 10 to 16 C, hot water and rocks deeper in the ground or possibly very hot molten rock (magma) deep below Earth’s surface. As with clean-energy sources like solar, geothermal energy systems vary, from those that use hot water from the ground directly to heat buildings, greenhouses and water, to those that pump underground hot water or steam to drive turbines. The David Suzuki Foundation’s Vancouver and Montreal offices use geothermal.

According to National Geographic, geothermal power plants use three methods to produce electricity: dry steam, flash steam and binary cycle. Dry steam uses steam from fractures in the ground. “Flash plants pull deep, high-pressure hot water into cooler, low-pressure water,” which creates steam. In binary plants, which produce no greenhouse gas emissions and will likely become dominant, “hot water is passed by a secondary fluid with a much lower boiling point,” which turns the secondary fluid into vapor.

Unlike wind and solar,
Quote
geothermal provides steady energy and can serve as a more cost-effective and less environmentally damaging form of baseload power than fossil fuels or nuclear.
It’s not entirely without environmental impacts, but most are minor and can be overcome with good planning and siting. Geothermal fluids can contain gases and heavy metals, but most new systems recycle them back into the ground. Operations should also be located to avoid mixing geothermal liquids with groundwater and to eliminate impacts on nearby natural features like hot springs. Some geothermal plants can produce small amounts of CO2, but binary systems are emissions-free. In some cases, resources that provide heat can become depleted over time.

Although geothermal potential has been constrained by the need to locate operations in areas with high volcanic activity, geysers or hot springs, new developments are making it more widely viable. One controversial method being tested is similar to “fracking” for oil and gas. Water is injected into a well with enough pressure to break rock and release heat to produce hot water and steam to generate power through a turbine or binary system.

Researchers have also been studying urban “heat islands” as sources of geothermal energy. Urban areas are warmer than their rural surroundings, both above and below ground, because of the effects of buildings, basements and sewage and water systems. Geothermal pumps could make the underground energy available to heat buildings in winter and cool them in summer.

New methods of getting energy from the ground could also give geothermal a boost. Entrepreneur Manoj Bhargava is working with researchers to bring heat to the surface using graphene cords rather than steam or hot water. Graphene is stronger than steel and conducts heat well. Bhargava says the technology would be simple to develop and could be integrated with existing power grids.

Unfortunately, geothermal hasn’t received the same level of government support as other sources of energy, including fossil fuels and nuclear. That’s partly because upfront costs are high and, as with oil and gas exploration, geothermal sources aren’t always located where developers hope they’ll be. As DeSmogBlog notes, resources are often found in areas that already have access to inexpensive hydro power.

Rapid advancements in renewable-energy and power-grid technologies could put the world on track to a mix of clean sources fairly quickly—which is absolutely necessary to curtail global warming. Geothermal energy should be part of that mix. 

http://ecowatch.com/2016/...suzuki-geothermal-energy/

Agelbert COMMENT: Of course. There is absolutely no excuse for the wasteful way that homes are heated and cooled now. There is no need to waste electricity that is often generated from polluting energy reSources or even hydropower.

Agelbert COMMENT: Of course. Every home that has running water all over the earth can, without wasting water, use geothermal energy without expensive coils placed several feet down. The water pipe infrastructure was paid for by we-the-people and is an untapped cheap and inexhaustible source of heating or cooling energy. Water temperature in the pipes is always several degrees cooler in summer and several degrees warmer in winter.

David, I have designed a computer program to make use of that energy. Of course, putting a heat pump in the process loop would be advisable for winter (in order to extract 72 degrees F from 45 degree F water). But for summer, it could be done without a heat pump. Some small expense would be required for a gray waste tank, valves, temperature sensors and the software. But that would be orders of magnitude cheaper than home geothermal infrastructure now and within the reach of even the poor who own homes and all the middle class.

Dr. Suzuki, If you are interested in this unpatented process, please contact me at anthonyg154@gmail.com (I will give you, and you only, all the details free).

This is my web site forum:

Renewable Revolution
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8257
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Geothermal Power
« Reply #32 on: May 24, 2016, 08:14:06 pm »
Geothermal Energy in Iceland


Volcanos Producing Energy 

The use of geothermal energy in Iceland must be the most inventive, progressive and eco-friendly energy system in the world.

They have five major geothermal power plants, which produce approximately 26% of the nation's energy. In addition, geothermal heating meets the heating and hot water requirements of approximately 87% of all buildings in Iceland.

Apart from geothermal energy, 75% of the nation’s electricity is generated by hydro power, and 0.1% from fossil fuels.

All of this energy: hydro and geothermal, is brought online without producing any air pollution or greenhouse gases.

It has been estimated that using geothermal for space heating instead of fossil fuels saves the country of Iceland annually about 100 million US dollars in imported oil.  ;D

Iceland’s state-owned energy company, Landsvirkjun, is considering construction of the world’s longest underwater electric cable so they can sell their vast geothermal and volcanic energy to the European market. 

 --Bibi Farber

http://www.nextworldtv.co...html#sthash.OmMli6Ky.dpuf
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8257
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Geothermal Power
« Reply #33 on: January 16, 2017, 06:56:16 pm »
Australian firm plans nation's largest geothermal plant in Imperial Valley  ;D

http://www.latimes.com/bu...n-sea-20170114-story.html
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8257
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Geothermal Power
« Reply #34 on: March 20, 2017, 07:09:27 pm »

Volcanos Producing Energy

The use of geothermal energy in Iceland must be the most inventive, progressive and eco-friendly energy system in the world.

 They have five major geothermal power plants, which produce approximately 26% of the nation's energy. In addition, geothermal heating meets the heating and hot water requirements of approximately 87% of all buildings in Iceland.

 Apart from geothermal energy, 75% of the nation's electricity is generated by hydro power, and 0.1% from fossil fuels.

 All of this energy: hydro and geothermal, is brought online without producing any air pollution or greenhouse gases.

 It has been estimated that using geothermal for space heating instead of fossil fuels saves the country of Iceland annually about 100 million US dollars in imported oil.

 Iceland's state-owned energy company, Landsvirkjun, is considering construction of the world's longest underwater electric cable so they can sell their vast geothermal and volcanic energy to the European market

 --Bibi Farber

http://www.nextworldtv.co...al-energy-in-iceland.html
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8257
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Geothermal Power
« Reply #35 on: May 20, 2017, 02:40:32 pm »


Scientists Discover Extreme Geothermal Activity in New Zealand's South Island  ;D

May 19, 2017

By Renewable Energy World Editors      geothermal
 
University of Otago yesterday said that a collaboration by scientists who drilled about a half-mile into the Alpine Fault of New Zealand’s South Island has revealed surprisingly high temperatures and the potential for large geothermal resources in the area.

The Deep Fault Drilling Project, jointly led by Victoria University of Wellington, GNS Science and the University of Otago, was carried out in 2014 in New Zealand’s Westland Province, north of Franz Josef Glacier.

According to University of Otago, the site was drilled by a team of more than 100 scientists from 12 countries, who were working to understand how earthquakes occur on geological faults.

The results of the project, published yesterday in Nature, discuss the site’s geothermal gradient—a measure of how fast the temperature increases going deeper beneath the earth's surface.

The project team discovered water at about 2,000 feet depth that was hot enough to boil. Similar geothermal temperatures are normally found at depths greater than two miles, the university said.

Warren Gilbertson, chief operating officer of the charitable trust Development West Coast, said in a May 18 statement that the discovery could transform the economy and resilience of Westland, and provide a significant clean energy resource that could be developed using local people and equipment.

"The location of geothermal activity and its possible benefit and association to the dairy and tourism sectors provide real opportunities from an economic perspective,” Gilbertson said.
 
Additional exploration and drilling will be needed to assess the economic potential.


http://www.renewableenerg...aland-s-south-island.html
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8257
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Geothermal Power
« Reply #36 on: October 11, 2017, 02:28:47 pm »


11 Oct 2017

Hamburg successfully tests aquifer heat storage system 

Quote
... to replace a coal plant and which can provide heat to 8,000 households in winter, ...



https://www.cleanenergywire.org/news/climate-targets-grave-danger-union-wants-energiewende-ministry/hamburg-successfully-tests-aquifer-heat-storage-system
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
87 Replies
4927 Views
Last post October 02, 2017, 08:09:40 pm
by AGelbert
1 Replies
118 Views
Last post July 09, 2014, 12:50:00 am
by AGelbert
0 Replies
143 Views
Last post September 18, 2014, 01:53:13 am
by AGelbert
4 Replies
154 Views
Last post December 01, 2017, 03:50:03 pm
by AGelbert
6 Replies
204 Views
Last post May 02, 2017, 10:54:35 pm
by AGelbert

+-Recent Topics

Darwin by AGelbert
December 16, 2017, 10:35:03 pm

Member Interesting, Hair Raising, Humorous or Otherwise Unusual Experiences by AGelbert
December 16, 2017, 10:31:31 pm

Fossil Fuels: Degraded Democracy and Profit Over Planet Pollution by AGelbert
December 16, 2017, 07:38:20 pm

Wind Power by AGelbert
December 16, 2017, 06:19:32 pm

The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth by AGelbert
December 16, 2017, 04:30:23 pm

Profiles in Courage by AGelbert
December 15, 2017, 11:49:23 pm

Global Warming is WITH US by AGelbert
December 15, 2017, 11:29:07 pm

Pollution by AGelbert
December 15, 2017, 05:05:03 pm

Future Earth by AGelbert
December 15, 2017, 02:51:20 pm

Corruption in Government by AGelbert
December 15, 2017, 01:35:42 pm

Free Web Hit Counter By CSS HTML Tutorial