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Author Topic: Electric Vehicles  (Read 5086 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Electric Vehicles
« Reply #225 on: June 15, 2017, 02:37:16 pm »

The Electrek Review: 2017 Hyundai IONIQ EV is the new efficiency champion, end of Prius era?

Seth Weintraub 

  - Apr. 5th 2017 4:54 pm ET
 @llsethj

Agelbert NOTE: Excellent review with multiple graphics, videos and comparison with Tesla specs. 

https://electrek.co/2017/04/05/hyundai-ioniq-ev-review/

 
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AGelbert

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AGelbert

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Re: Electric Vehicles
« Reply #227 on: June 16, 2017, 06:46:19 pm »
Tesla Model X = Safest SUV Ever, Because Some Humans Have Hearts 

June 13th, 2017 by Zachary Shahan

SNIPPET:

The Tesla Model X has been scored as the safest SUV the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has ever tested, and the second safest vehicle the NHTSA has ever tested … only trailing the Tesla Model S.  ;D

First, the front barrier test:



Next, the side impact test that simulates what happens if you get T boned at an intersection.


And now the sideways on ice into a telephone pole test.


Tesla Model X the First SUV Ever to Achieve 5-Star Crash Rating in Every Category
The Tesla Team June 13, 2017

We engineered Model X to be the safest SUV ever, and today, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) announced that after conducting independent testing, it has awarded Model X a 5-star safety rating in every category and sub-category, making it the first SUV ever to earn the 5-star rating across the board. More than just resulting in a 5-star rating, the data from NHTSA’s testing shows that Model X has the lowest probability of injury of any SUV it has ever tested. In fact, of all the cars NHTSA has ever tested, Model X’s overall probability of injury was second only to Model S.

Model X performs so much better in a crash than gas-powered SUVs because of its all-electric architecture and powertrain design. The rigid, fortified battery pack that powers Model X is mounted beneath the floor of the vehicle creating a center of gravity so low that Model X has the lowest rollover probability of any SUV on the road. No other SUV has ever come close to meeting and exceeding this rollover requirement.

NHTSA’s tests assess both the structure of the vehicle, which must minimize intrusion into the cabin and absorb as much energy as possible, and also the seatbelt and airbag restraint system, which must maximize injury mitigation in the event of a crash. Among the nine subcategories rated by NHTSA, including frontal impact, side impact, and pole impact tests conducted on both the driver and passenger side as well as the rollover test, Model X achieved 5-stars in every category and sub-category. That means that in the event of a serious crash, Model X occupants have an overall 93% probability of walking away without a serious injury – a testament to our commitment to building the safest cars on today’s roads.


Full article:   


https://cleantechnica.com/2017/06/13/tesla-model-x-safest-suv-ever-humans-hearts/
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AGelbert

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Re: Electric Vehicles
« Reply #228 on: June 17, 2017, 01:00:10 pm »
China Electric Car Sales Grow 49% — BAIC EC180 Leads Rise of Microcars

June 17th, 2017 by Jose Pontes

SNIPPET:


#1 – Zhidou D2 EV: This bare-basic city vehicle probably doesn’t inspire anyone, but surely continues to be delivered in record quantities (4,471 units in May), probably thanks to big fleet deals. This vehicle is sold as a quadricycle (think Renault Twizy class) in some European countries, with the following specs: 12 kWh battery, 120 km range, 90 km max speed, and all for some €16,000








Full article with a discussion of all the EVs shown above:   

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/06/17/china-electric-car-sales-grow-49-baic-ec180-leads-rise-microcars/
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AGelbert

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Re: Electric Vehicles
« Reply #229 on: June 21, 2017, 07:53:48 pm »
What is it like owning a Model S? I'm not talking about just driving it. What makes this experience novel versus buying/owning your previous vehicle(s)?

Kirsten Oulton, Model S owner and evangelist

Updated Feb 17, 2016

I could probably have made a much longer list, but I'll leave you with a few of the more memorable differences that have nothing to do with the driving (which would require a huge post  just to cover that):

Purchasing: I have bought quite a few cars in the past, and dread the dealership experience. I've never been able to buy a new car in under two hours (I have managed as little as an hour on a used car). I particularly can't bear how they make it as hard as possible to understand how much you are paying for each item, while subjecting me to a salesperson, his/her manager, and sometimes (for added fun) the dealership owner while we get various things approved. I've enjoyed dental surgery more. Here is my purchase experience for the car: 1. Test drive in the middle of a snow storm (4" of fresh snow) before it was plowed (the rep challenged me to try and make it spin out... I failed) (20 min.), 2. Discuss the 1 feature that was unclear to me before making my selections (5 min.), 3. Register the order online (4 min.)... and DONE. 29 minutes. Now, to be fair, people often test drive one or more times... so the only part we really need to compare to get an apples-to-apples comparison to my best ever dealership time (1 hour for a used car) versus the Tesla time ( 5 + 4 = 9 minutes). I could have done it from home, but I was coming in to the dealership anyways because I wanted to test the car under the hardest conditions I could find. And while the price range was steep, I at least know that every single other purchaser pays the exact same price, so I didn't fail to negotiate the imaginary best possible price for once;

"Filling up": Some people discuss range anxiety. I haven't had this problem. I drive 4,000+ km (2,485 +mi) a month. On my busiest day (not counting road trips between provinces), I did 370 km, which was less than the 80% charge I normally have on the vehicle in the morning. (Important note: many owners don't even charge their vehicles to 100%, allowing the battery usage to rotate.) What does this mean? I don't have range anxiety. I come home at night, I plug it in and when I wake up, the car has more than enough to get me through my day. Actually, when I'm being a bit more conservative, I can go days in between charges, but this is the real worst case: if you're not driving cross-country, you're not going to "fill up" during a day again. I live in Canada, and after last winter's "polar vortex", I can't say I miss standing outside filling up my car with expensive gas while my extremities were freezing solid;

Capacity: To be honest, when I bought the car, I hadn't really seriously considered how much storage space there is in a Model S. But a crowd actually assembled around the car at the hockey rink. Why? You go to the back and open the trunk. There's this great big flat expanse. My husband loaded two full hockey bags, 4 sticks and some overnight bags on top. Still not full. There was a compartment under the flat bit where he'd stored an emergency kit, some blankets and other odds and ends, but the crowd hadn't seen that part. They were mostly amazed but the fact we got two hockey bags in at all... let alone kept going. It got funnier. He then went around to the frunk (front trunk) and proceeded to fill it with cases of beer and a small cooler. Then you stuff 3 adult males in the back seat in winter jackets. There was a guy driving (I kid you not) a Lincoln Navigator staring at our 4-door sedan with a frown on his face, trying to figure out (I imagine) why he was paying so much for a gas-guzzling beast with similar storage;

Cell phones:
My husband and I share the vehicle, which means that often one of us is on public transit or waiting to be picked up as we navigate our lives. We used to phone each other, checking to see when/where we'd meet and why are you late and so forth. That's pretty much stopped entirely. Why? I have an app on my phone, iPad and both my home and work laptops. I can see where he is in the car, and how fast he's going, and there's no point in calling to ask why he's late... I can see the traffic and him crawling along the highway. I know where he is, and when he'll turn up (or vice versa).  During a flash flood that took out a number of sections on a highway I knew he was driving with accidents and floating vehicles, I was perfectly calm, and didn't have to call him. Why? I could see that he'd diverted to side roads uphill of the flood, and was driving slowly along. He's fine... no need to bother him;

Sharing a car is easier: My husband and I have very different proportions. In other cars, if I wasn't paying attention, I would bruise assorted bits trying to get in before I remembered to pull the seat back. The Tesla switches the seat, side mirrors and steering wheel all around to "my" settings at a touch of a single button. I believe that this will get only better over time as Tesla continues to update the GPS, radio, Internet and other features to recognize the difference between my driver profile and his; and

Service: On three distinct occasions, my husband has made a comment on a Tesla-themed (but not owned) message board that could be construed as a complaint. He didn't send it to Tesla, and it wasn't bad enough to make it worth while to call the local service centre. Ironically, this didn't matter: in less than 24 hours, each time, the local service centre called us voluntarily to book an appointment to look at the issue at OUR CONVENIENCE. What? Huh? Since when does the manufacturer care how I feel, let alone go out of its way to make me happy? That on it's own is hard to imagine, and when you add to it that they picked the car up, fixed the minor annoyances for free, and brought the car back all at our convenience? I'm blown away.

https://www.quora.com/
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AGelbert

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Re: Electric Vehicles
« Reply #230 on: June 23, 2017, 02:05:48 pm »
Tesla Has The Most Aggressive EV Sales Goals, Battery Cost Reductions, & Charging Capabilities, Says IEA

June 23rd, 2017 by Guest Contributor

Tesla Model X, Model S, and Model 3 (Image: Motor Trend)

SNIPPET:


The International Energy Agency provides video recap of key findings from their Global EV Outlook 2017 report (Source: IEA)


Battery costs are on the way down and energy density is on the way up. There is every reason to believe that this trend will continue, narrowing the cost gap between EVs and internal combustion engines (ICEs). The IEA predicts that there will be between 40 and 70 million electric cars on the road by 2025.

Tesla readies its new vehicles to be delivered to customers (Image: Autoblog)

Looking to the future, many industry observers have said that a price point of $100/kWh will allow EVs to reach cost parity with legacy vehicles. The DOE expects the industry to be near that point by 2022, and GM predicts that it will reach the magic 100-dollar mark by that date. One of Tesla’s original co-founders Martin Eberhard and Tesla’s current CFO Deepak Ahuja each recently predicted that the $100 tipping point would be achieved in that timeframe. Tesla’s cost target (according to the IEA’s chart) is – surprise, surprise – even more aggressive, reaching the Promised Land in 2020.

Inside Tesla’s Model S battery pack (Instagram: dominickcarluccio)

Full article with several eye opening charts and information guaranteed to give the fosssil fueler Tesla haters lots of heartburn:  ;D

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/06/23/tesla-aggressive-ev-sales-goals-battery-cost-reductions-charging-capabilities-says-iea/







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AGelbert

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Re: Electric Vehicles
« Reply #231 on: June 23, 2017, 06:48:58 pm »
Agelbert NOTE: I just found this. It was of interest to me and I'm sure you will find it of interest as well.  8)

What happens when Tesla Model S's battery is full and it is going down hill?  ??? John Gustafson, Tesla owner since 2011

Answered May 4, 2016 · Upvoted byRoshan Jayachandran, Head of engine tuning, Renault BR engines (Kwid & other CMF-A platforms)

Quote
This is a really good question, and it affects not only Teslas but hybrids like the Prius that use regenerative braking.

When the battery tops off, regenerative braking is disabled. On a Tesla (any model), a warning light appears on the display, because the driver needs to know that the feel of the brakes is going to be different.

With no energy being taken out of the car through the electromagnetic damping of regenerative braking, you suddenly need to press the brakes like you would on a typical non-EV, non-hybrid car, because you are actually using good old-fashioned friction to slow down the car. Disks and brake pads. It can be disconcerting if you don’t notice the warning on the display because suddenly having to press harder on the brake makes you feel like your brakes are failing, though of course they aren’t.

All EVs use regenerative braking first, but if the battery is full or if you brake hard, the conventional braking system kicks in.
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AGelbert

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Re: Electric Vehicles
« Reply #232 on: June 25, 2017, 02:48:17 pm »
How many Tesla cars already needed battery replacement?
Ryan Harker
Answered Jun 19, 2017

The current battery in a Tesla is built to last at least 500,000 miles (800,000 km) before it needs to be replaced, currently most batteries look like they will last a lot longer than this.

https://electrek.co/2016/11/01/tesla-battery-degradation/

Tesla CEO Elon Musk says that “the company had simulated over 500,000 miles on it and that it was still operating at over 80% of its original capacity”, thats about 40 years worth of driving for the average driver.

Plus they also have battery swap guarantee which if your battery degrades by more than 20% in 8 years, they’ll replace it.

The battery in Tesla cars will last a very long time before you need to replace it, if you drive over 800,000 km you might notice significant loss of up to 20% but even then you can just get a new one installed for around $10,000 US dollars, and then you’re good for another 40 years of driving.


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