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Author Topic: Carbon Neutral Buildings  (Read 4483 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Carbon Neutral Buildings
« Reply #75 on: July 03, 2018, 02:20:13 pm »
I will do a bit of shameless plugging for the company. Here is a testimonial to one of our showcase systems. There is nothing modest here to see but it is the reality of what is pushing solar forward. 3 panels on a cabin might be noble in its austerity but those systems do lights some water pumping and a bit of refrigeration at best. This one is a grid zero system which uses the grid when it needs a boost but does not feed back to it.  Enjoy


Nice system, and what a nice testimonial! What's the output?

And the house. Wow. I'll never own anything that nice, I don't expect.

Investment banker? Gold miner?



I wrote this and lost it, so this is the Cliffs Notes version.

I picked this installer because I know someone who works there. Turns out they are a local company but are 100% Sunpower. The Texas franchise, entire state. They do Whole Foods and UT. Lots of high end installs. Their panels are engineered differently than any panel I've ever seen. Design improvements according to them. They claim almost zero hail problems in this hail prone area, which is impressive.

100% Micro-inverters. He said they just bought Enphase and would be using Enphase inverters going forward.


Any feedback on Sunpower?

The deal is excellent. But they have to achieve a certain efficiency level to get me the city rebate. That means I can't immediately put panels on the east facing roof. Because it would lower the efficiency of the entire system.

I'd have to do 43 panels on the south and west faces to max them and get the rebate. That's a 13.8 Kw system and it should cut my grid bill by about half, according to their estimate, and he says they hit it pretty close. I still get the federal tax credit too. That's much more of a subsidy (30%).

I can also get a federal tax credit on adding the additional lower output east-facing panels, which I can add as soon as I collect the rebate on the first install. I haven't yet seen numbers on how much that would add to the output.

They have stellar financing (2.9% for 12 years), so I can buy the 13.8Kw system with the same dollars I'm using to buy power. That seems like a no brainer. I'll max the east roof too, I think. I want to see how much it adds to the bill.

Stellar warranty from Sunpower, which also warrants the install (roof leaks included). They use Invisimount racking. 25 year warranty  on everything, 92% efficiency guaranteed in 25 years.

And once again, the federal tax credit is going away. Not for a couple of years I think, but with the cost of borrowing almost guaranteed to go up too, it looks like a good time to make this happen
.
sounds good. Do a websearch on the reviews of the enphase model they are selecting. They had some duds. I'll admit I'm biased as I had to replace 23 of them out of 40 on a nice old ladies roof this spring. That was 3 years ago though I'm sure they are back on their game now. Split roof partial shade micros are the way to go...

Will do. Thanks for your advice. It is greatly appreciated.

But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

AGelbert

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Re: Carbon Neutral Buildings
« Reply #76 on: July 14, 2018, 05:50:53 pm »



THE REPORT

Designers vs. Climate Change

Leading architects, designers, and urban planners are devising plans to help mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Are they our best hope for a brighter future?

Posted July 4, 2018

text by Meaghan O'Neill


SNIPPET:

For professionals like these, business as usual is simply outdated. In the U.S. today, buildings consume 39 percent of total energy used—higher than both the transportation (29 percent) and industrial (32 percent) sectors. But what if buildings—or even entire cities—could generate more energy than they used, clean the surrounding air and water, and even sequester carbon dioxide? The idea isn’t too far-fetched.

Technology to mitigate emissions already exists, is accessible, and can even be cost-effective. And small course corrections in our approach to the built environment could make a big a difference in emissions industry-wide. (Designing for resilience—that is, creating and protecting built environments that will withstand rising seas, more frequent and severe storms, and other effects of climate change—is also paramount.) According to Paul Hawken’s 2017 book Drawdown, if just 9.7 percent of new buildings were net-zero energy by 2050, global greenhouse gas emissions would be 7.1 gigatons lower. That’s equivalent to eliminating annual emissions from all livestock worldwide. Yet the biggest barrier to building greener buildings and cities may not be cost or political will, but simply inertia.

Top: A modern home by ZeroEnergy Design; Above: The interior of a barn renovated by ZeroEnergy Design. Photo: Eric Roth

“Designing a building to code is the worst possible building you could build,” says Horowitz. “We need to do better.” Considering fuel inputs, the entire lifecycle of a building and the future of the grid are essential factors, says Horowitz, a self-proclaimed “data literacy” advocate who joined the Architecture 2030 Challenge (a group with the goal to make all buildings and major renovations carbon-neutral by 2030) as a way to stay publicly accountable for all projects in her portfolio.

It’s also worth mentioning that building smaller, more efficient spaces would go a long way toward reducing our collective carbon footprint. In the 1950s, for example, the size of the average American home was about 1,700 square feet; today, it’s closer to 2,500 🐷 🐖.

Designing for Low Carbon Impact—and Human Beings

“Decisions we make as architects and engineers impact the land we build on for the next 100 years,” says Cara Carmichael, an engineer and environmental designer at the Rocky Mountain Institute, a nonprofit organization that works to dissuade the use of fossil fuels. With the help of ZGF Architects, RMI recently built its 15,610-square-foot Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado, to be a showcase of net-zero energy efficiency.


By using high-end windows and insulation, an airtight envelope, passive solar design, natural and efficient artificial lighting, automation and metering, natural ventilation, and photovoltaics, the building can produce more energy than it uses in a year. In cooler months, radiant heating delivers warm air where people need it most, instead of overheating low-use spaces (like ceilings and transitional areas). The result is a building that’s 74 percent more efficient than its average counterpart.

While advanced systems react to external weather and lighting conditions, people who occupy the building retain precise control over their micro-environments. Desk, ceiling, and even in-chair fans allow for personal adjustments. And while a sophisticated louver system creates shade as necessary—eliminating the need for air conditioning—individuals can open windows when they want fresh air. Because buildings like this champion low-tech methods (tight envelopes and LED lighting, for example) rather than high-tech mechanical systems, they can often be built at or near the same cost as a traditional building.

One key to success is the early integration of cross-disciplinary teams who can accurately predict how a building will perform over its lifecycle. “It’s not just a check-the-box thing,” says Carmichael, who collaborated with architects, engineers, land planners, solar and lighting experts, and contractors to crunch numbers from the get-go. “It’s a powerful tool to shape design.”

Net Zero, Passive House, and Living Buildings

Since the 1990s, various certifications, like the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, have emerged for healthier buildings with lower carbon impact. Now, Net Zero, Passive House, and Living Buildings labels are also helping designers create better spaces. Though specific criteria vary, they ultimately share several common goals: The design of built environments that use less fossil fuel energy, produce less pollution, and improve the well-being of people who use them.

Built in collaboration with the Miller Hull Partnership, the Bullitt Center in Seattle, a designated Living Building, is a net-positive energy building that uses photovoltaics to generate power. There’s no cooling system—windows automatically open and close—and it even employs six stories of composting toilets. In short, it operates like a natural system—always responding to its conditions.

Designer Jason McLennan explains Living Buildings in a TEDx talk.


To reduce their impacts significantly, such buildings implement these and other tools, including ground source heat pumps, smart thermostats, green roofs, and closed-loop water systems. While some features remain expensive to install, all are easy to acquire.

Several public and multi-unit Passive House projects are also pushing the efficiency envelope. In New York, the Perch Harlem, designed by architect Chris Benedict, consumes 90 percent less energy than a standard building and 75 percent less than similar new construction. “Making these projects happen—and quickly—at scale is really exciting,” says Horowitz, who has also worked on several multi-unit spaces. Elsewhere, entire communities are working toward net-zero energy goals. In Cambridge, Massachusetts, for example, plans are underway for all new buildings to be net-zero by 2040.

FULL ARTICLE:

https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/designers-architects-take-on-climate-change


But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

AGelbert

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Re: Carbon Neutral Buildings
« Reply #77 on: October 04, 2018, 02:38:17 pm »


RMI RELEASES NEW VIDEO ON CARBON-FREE CITIES

Cities are at the forefront of climate change risk and opportunity. Over 9,000 cities are making climate commitments, but they will only get us so far and must be substantiated with on-the-ground solutions that enable cities to make rapid progress toward near-term decarbonization and put them on a path to full climate neutrality. RMI’s new Carbon-Free Cities video highlights work in four cities in Europe, China, India, and the US that are leading the efforts against climate change with innovative on-the-ground projects.

WATCH NOW:


Rocky Mountain Institute

Published on Sep 28, 2018

Cities are at the forefront of climate change risk and opportunity. Nearly 600 cities are making climate commitments, but they will only get us so far and must be substantiated with on-the-ground solutions that enable cities to make rapid progress toward near-term decarbonization, and put them on a path to full climate-neutrality.

The Carbon-Free City Handbook helps city staff implement climate policies and actions that resolutely place their communities on an aggressive path toward sustainable, low-carbon economies.
But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
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AGelbert

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Re: Carbon Neutral Buildings
« Reply #78 on: October 04, 2018, 02:51:41 pm »


Zero-Energy Homes Are Ready for Mainstream Markets

October 2, 2018  |  By Alisa Petersen Michael Gartman

SNIPPET:

Zero-energy (ZE) homes—efficient homes that produce or procure as much renewable energy as they consume over the course of a year—are often marketed as luxury homes, only available to the select few that are willing to pay a significant premium to do the right thing for the environment. In keeping with this luxury perception, research shows these homes are often more comfortable and healthier than conventional homes for a variety of reasons. Mainstream media outlets have suggested cost premiums as high as 40 percent for sustainable real estate.

However, the economics for these homes have changed: ZE homes have quietly passed cost thresholds that make them not only good for the environment but also cost-effective. As the underlying technologies and design elements continue to improve and scale, these costs will continue to decline.

Read more:

https://www.rmi.org/zero-energy-homes-are-ready-for-mainstream-markets/
But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

AGelbert

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Re: Carbon Neutral Buildings
« Reply #79 on: December 01, 2018, 03:08:17 pm »
Turning Taiwan's Trash Into Treasure

We have seen buildings made from recycled materials-- but this is 3 stories high!  :o 👍


The EcoARK Pavilion in Taiwan is built largely out of recycled plastic bottles, about 1.5 million of them, making it the world's first fully functional large scale plastic building.

It was the centerpiece for the Taipei International Flora Exposition that ran from November of 2010 until April of 2011.

It weighs 50 percent less than a conventional building, yet it is strong enough to withstand hurricanes, typhoons -- even fire!

The EcoARK pavilion is hailed as a new benchmark for the future of green buildings. It is astounding to see an experimental building on this massive scale, and consider the engineering and imagination that went into making this a viable and safe structure for the public.

If they make it work at this scale, imagine how much else can be done with these building techniques?

--Bibi Farber

This video was produced by the BBC during the construction phase.

http://www.nextworldtv.com/page/5702.html
But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

AGelbert

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Re: Carbon Neutral Buildings
« Reply #80 on: February 23, 2019, 05:00:21 pm »
Agelbert NOTE: Good advice that applies to the USA every bit as much as it applies to Australia. 👍

You don’t have to turn your house upside down to bring energy cost down.

This upside-down pyramid shows some recommended steps to increase energy efficiency. The most important thing to remember is that each step should be carried out in the correct order (1-9) to gain the maximum benefit. The first step is relatively easy, but very cost effective. As you go down the steps, the cost and difficulty of the retrofit increase.

Upside Down Retrofitting Energy Efficiency, driving down your heating and cooling energy costs systematically. ✨

 



Step 1:



Caulk above and below the window architraves and around internal door architraves, especially around the top of the door.

Exhaust Fan air leakage

Caulk the skirting boards to the floor.
Seal up any old wall vents with plaster or closed cell foam backing rod.
Seal up holes inside the kitchen, laundry and bathroom cupboards, where plumbing goes through the wall.
Seal up hidden holes behind fridge, dishwasher and oven.
If you have ducted heating, find the return grill, take it off the wall and inspect and seal the cavity behind it.
In areas, you can reach, inspect the insulation for gaps and compression (under the floor, in the ceiling space.)  Insulation works best with perfect coverage.

Step 2:



swampy air leakageDraught-proof your exhaust fans in the toilet (Install a flap that opens when the air is exhausted), bathroom and kitchen, and make sure they are ducted to the outside. At the same time put in place supply air vents, which will allow the exhaust fans to operate efficiently.
Install quality window and doors seals/weather stripping, and make sure the bottom of all external doors have a draught stopper device.  Go to our webshop for door and window seals.

Step 3:

Cover up all evaporative cooler vents during the winter heating period. Open vents act like chimneys during the winter and suck the warm air from the house.  Better yet, have your evaporative cooler removed entirely, and install some localised inverter split systems for cooling.

Step 4:Box Air conditioner Air leakage



Remove old box (wall) air conditioners. They are grossly inefficient and leak lots of air.  Use split systems for Heating & Cooling, and when they are being installed, ensure the contractor understands that all the penetrations need to be made airtight.

Step 5:

Use expandable foam (in a can) to seal the internal wall cavity from inside the attic space.  Also, check gaps and holes in cavity sliding door pockets from above.  Internal wall sliding doors can contribute to significant air leakage.

Step 6:

Use Spray Polyurethane Foam to seal and insulate under the floorboards. This is not a DIY job, but make sure the installer also covers the bottom of external walls to prevent wall insulation from falling.  Also, ensure the installer is reputable.

Step 7:

There are installers capable of insulating existing external walls with loose insulation. It’s non-intrusive and very effective. Unfortunately, this is not a job for the DIY person.
Replace single glazed windows with double or triple glazed.

Step 8:



Uninsulated corner/corniceTight, well-sealed homes need proper ventilation to keep adequate indoor air quality. Consider the installation of a whole house mechanical ventilation system. (Energy Recovery Ventilation System)

They offer:

Filter Dust
Filter Pollen
Guarantee level of CO2 in Living areas
Recover the temperature of the stale air leaving the living space into the new fresh air coming in.

Step 9:

Install double or triple glazed windows.  Ensure the following:

► The gap between panes should be between 10-14mm at least.  Any gap smaller or wider impacts on glazing performance.
► The spacer in between the panes is foam and not steel or aluminium
► The window frame is made of wood or thermally broken aluminium
► If you can afford it, get Low-E Glass
► Once installed caulk around architraves.


Undertaking all nine steps will result in the ultimate energy efficient house, but rest assure that each step will bring with it some tangible benefits including lower energy bills! 

https://efficiencymatrix.com/upside-residential-energy-efficiency-retrofit/
But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

AGelbert

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Re: Carbon Neutral Buildings
« Reply #81 on: February 25, 2019, 02:50:43 pm »
Agelbert NOTE: Good advice that applies to the USA every bit as much as it applies to Australia. 👍

You don’t have to turn your house upside down to bring energy cost down.

This upside-down pyramid shows some recommended steps to increase energy efficiency. The most important thing to remember is that each step should be carried out in the correct order (1-9) to gain the maximum benefit. The first step is relatively easy, but very cost effective. As you go down the steps, the cost and difficulty of the retrofit increase.

Upside Down Retrofitting Energy Efficiency, driving down your heating and cooling energy costs systematically. ✨

 

//
Undertaking all nine steps will result in the ultimate energy efficient house, but rest assure that each step will bring with it some tangible benefits including lower energy bills! 

https://efficiencymatrix.com/upside-residential-energy-efficiency-retrofit/

This is excellent. It seems obvious, but it's nice to have the hierarchy and order in which to do these.
Good stuff, AG. thanks.


You are welcome, bro. 🌞

I'm going to need a new roof this summer so I am doing research on all the ins and outs of home maintenance. There is a metal roof I am looking at that is a bit pricy but very durable and environentally friendly (it is 100% recyclable and made mostly from recycled metal). We'll see.


But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

AGelbert

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Re: Carbon Neutral Buildings
« Reply #82 on: February 25, 2019, 02:51:55 pm »

I'm going to need a new roof this summer so I am doing research on all the ins and outs of home maintenance. There is a metal roof I am looking at that is a bit pricy but very durable and environentally friendly (it is 100% recyclable and made mostly from recycled metal). We'll see.

You know, if you decide to do this project, a series of dispatches (complete with photos) would be of great interest. The roof itself sounds interesting.

When the roof gets done, I'll see if the roofer will take before, during and after pictures and send them to me via e-mail. We have no cell phone or camera so that's the only way it could happen. If they will do that, I will post them with lots of commentary about it. I am not an expert builder or craftsman as the Canadian dude that posts on the Doomstead Diner (but not on my channel because he doesn't like me giving his builder craftsman highness any lip about Canadian fossil fuel loving stupidity. :D).

I am no expert. But, I am observant and do my homework when commenting on any subject I post on. So, in the event I am able to post about this project, I firmly believe it will aid readers in preparing for a similar project.

I have a small, uncomplicated (no gables ;D 👍) roof. The run from the roof ridge to the fascia is a little less than 8 feet. So, the two sides of 70' by 8' come to about 1,120 sq. ft. of roof plus new ridge vent, drip edge and fascia. I've got a wild idea about extending the eves out 6 inches to help protect the windows but it probably costs too much so fuggetaboudit.

It's been 13 years or so since I used the kerosene fired furnace , so I might just have the stack pulled and the hole plugged with OSB and undelayment in order to have one less potential roof leak location. I would love to eliminate the vent pipes and roof fans and the bathroom skylight so the roof has no potential leak areas. There is this great peel and stick waterproofing (rubbery and super sticky some hours after placing) that goes on the rake and from the eves up that I am looking at as part of the underlayment.

I have studied the code about the minimum distance the vent needs to be for proper bathroom flushing. It is possible to vent through the roof, though an electrical fan along the vent pipe may be required. My roof ridge vent runs nearly the length of the home and the toilets could, in theory, be vented through there. We'll see. The toilet vent pipes have always been substandard as to easy flushing from the beginning. At first I thought it was just the low water volume new type toilets. After 20 years of often required plunger use, I am convinced that the toilet venting needs help (though they are within proper code required distance from the toilets). We'll see what can be done.

In theory (famous last words), if the roof has ZERO openings on it for pipe vents, the furnace stack, the stove, fans and a skylight, AND ALL the venting goes through the roof ridge vent (with well placed roof cavity mechanical fans helping out), the cost of putting a metal (or shingle) roof would would be much cheaper, faster and leakproof. They would have to put OSB and waterproof undelayment under all those holes where the vents and so on were, of course. We'll see what is most economically feasable.


Here's a screenshot of my sketchup graphic of half of my dream roof:


I'll let you know what develops.
But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

AGelbert

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Re: Carbon Neutral Buildings
« Reply #83 on: February 25, 2019, 03:11:56 pm »

I'm going to need a new roof this summer so I am doing research on all the ins and outs of home maintenance. There is a metal roof I am looking at that is a bit pricy but very durable and environentally friendly (it is 100% recyclable and made mostly from recycled metal). We'll see.

You know, if you decide to do this project, a series of dispatches (complete with photos) would be of great interest. The roof itself sounds interesting.

When the roof gets done, I'll see if the roofer will take before, during and after pictures and send them to me via e-mail. We have no cell phone or camera so that's the only way it could happen. If they will do that, I will post them with lots of commentary about it. I am not an expert builder or craftsman as the Canadian dude that posts on the Doomstead Diner (but not on my channel because he doesn't like me giving his builder craftsman highness any lip about Canadian fossil fuel loving stupidity. :D).

I am no expert. But, I am observant and do my homework when commenting on any subject I post on. So, in the event I am able to post about this project, I firmly believe it will aid readers in preparing for a similar project.

I have a small, uncomplicated (no gables ;D 👍) roof. The run from the roof ridge to the fascia is a little less than 8 feet. So, the two sides of 70' by 8' come to about 1,120 sq. ft. of roof plus new ridge vent, drip edge and fascia. I've got a wild idea about extending the eves out 6 inches to help protect the windows but it probably costs too much so fuggetaboudit.

It's been 13 years or so since I used the kerosene fired furnace , so I might just have the stack pulled and the hole plugged with OSB and undelayment in order to have one less potential roof leak location. I would love to eliminate the of vent pipes and roof fans and the bathroom skylight so the roof has no potential leak areas. There is this great peel and stick waterproofing (rubbery and super sticky some hours after placing) that goes on the rake and from the eves up that I am looking at as part of the underlayment.

I have studied the code about the minimum distance the vent needs to be for proper bathroom flushing. It is possible to vent through the roof, though an electrical fan along vent pipe may be required. My roof ridge vent runs nearly the length of the home and the toilets could, in theory, be vented through there. We'll see. The toilets vent pipes have always been substandard as to easy flushing from the beginning. At first I thought it was just the low water volume new type toilets. After 20 years of often required plunger use, I am convinced that the toilet venting needs help (though they are within proper code required distance from the toilets). We'll see what can be done.

In theory (famous last words), if the roof has ZERO openings on it for pipe vents, the furnace stack, the stove, fans and a skylight, AND ALL the venting goes through the roof ridge vent (with well placed roof cavity mechanical fans helping out), the cost of putting a metal (or shingle) roof would would be much cheaper, faster and leakproof. They would have to put OSB and waterproof undelayment under all those holes where the vents and so on were, of course. We'll see what is most economically feasable.


Here's a screenshot of my sketchup graphic of half of my dream roof:


I'll let you know what develops.
I suppose petty little comments like that are par for the  course. Good luck on your roof project.

I figured that would get your attention.  ;D

Thank you for your well wishes. Feel free to post your thoughts on roofing, venting, eve extension problems and so on. I listen carefully and seriously to builder experts like you, even if I don't always get along with them.  8)
But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

AGelbert

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Re: Carbon Neutral Buildings
« Reply #84 on: February 25, 2019, 04:58:47 pm »
if your low flow toilet is 20 yrs old it's a first generation.  They always were poor flushers even with perfect venting. The most affordable modern low flow is probably the cadet3 available at any big box hardware store. If it's like here they have a display with ratings for solids and water used. The difference is night and day and it's way cheaper then reworking your vent stack.

Thank you for that info. 👍  I was unaware of that and will keep that in mind about the cadet3 toilet.
But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

AGelbert

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Re: Carbon Neutral Buildings
« Reply #85 on: May 15, 2019, 04:23:03 pm »
May 15, 2019

WildEarth GUARDIANS


Power to the people


But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

AGelbert

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SNIPPET:

America’s 125 million residential units account for approximately 20 percent of the country’s total carbon emissions, but only roughly 12,500 of these units (0.01 percent  :() are operating at net zero energy, according to the Net Zero Energy Coalition’s 2017 inventory. Progress continues to be hindered in large part by the disaggregation of both supply and demand―today, every retrofit is a custom job, involving significant time, complexity and cost.

At the same time, nearly 50 million Americans are living at or below the federal poverty line  :(, with many struggling to pay for their utilities versus other basic needs. While low-income families stand to benefit the most from high-performing buildings, they also face the greatest barriers in accessing them, spending up to 20 percent of their income on energy, compared to just 4 percent for the average US household.

“We are excited to partner with the Rocky Mountain Institute and California Energy Commission to invest in an initiative designed for the multifamily sector,” said Daniel Simmons, Assistant Secretary of DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. “This partnership will help American families realize new energy and cost-saving opportunities while improving their quality of life with more comfortable, healthier homes.”


Read more:

But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

Surly1

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Re: Carbon Neutral Buildings
« Reply #87 on: June 28, 2019, 12:32:15 pm »
AG, you should enjoy this one. What a terrific idea.

This House Is Made from 600,000 Recycled Plastic Water Bottles
But you'd never know by looking at it.





JD COMPOSITES
  • Canadian builders have built a home out of more than 600,000 plastic water bottles.
  • The builders broke down bottles and turned into foam that hardens when cooled. This foam was used to create the walls.
  • The home is the first of its kind to ever be built.

Canadian builders have created a new way to turn plastic waste into environmentally friendly housing. JD Composites, a construction company led by Joel German and David Saulnier, built a three-bedroom home along the Meteghan River in Nova Scotia from more than 600,000 plastic water bottles—but you'd never guess it from just looking at the home.

image
JD COMPOSITES

German and Saulnier shredded and heated the water bottles to form plastic pellets and placed them into a hopper, where they were treated with gases that melted them into a foam. When cooled, the foam becomes solid and is rot- and mildew-resistant. The builders then used the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) panels to create the 5.9-inch-thick walls of the green home.

Besides the fact that the panels utilize plastic that might've otherwise ended up in a landfill or the ocean, they're able to withstand tough weather conditions, too.

German and Saulnier sent a sample panel for endurance testing to Mississauga, Ontario and discovered it could stand firm against against 326-mph winds—two times as strong as a category 5 hurricane. The results are especially impressive considering the panels are lightweight and the wind tunnel reached its max force without being able to cause damage to the test panel.

The hardened foam is covered by a fiberglass skin along both the interior and exterior of the home, and UV paint was used to protect the material from sunlight.

The company plans to list the home for sale, but will rent it on Airbnb if it can't find a buyer.

“If it doesn’t sell, it’s fine,” German told the Hants Journal. “It’s our first one. We’re sort of attached to it.”


AGelbert

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AG, you should enjoy this one. What a terrific idea.


By Daisy Hernandez
Jun 27, 2019


This House Is Made from 600,000 Recycled Plastic Water Bottles

But you'd never know by looking at it.

German and Saulnier shredded and heated the water bottles to form plastic pellets and placed them into a hopper, where they were treated with gases that melted them into a foam. When cooled, the foam becomes solid and is rot- and mildew-resistant. The builders then used the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) panels to create the 5.9-inch-thick walls of the green home.

Besides the fact that the panels utilize plastic that might've otherwise ended up in a landfill or the ocean, they're able to withstand tough weather conditions, too.

German and Saulnier sent a sample panel for endurance testing to Mississauga, Ontario and discovered it could stand firm against against 326-mph winds— two times as strong as a category 5 hurricane. The results are especially impressive considering the panels are lightweight and the wind tunnel reached its max force without being able to cause damage to the test panel.


The hardened foam is covered by a fiberglass skin along both the interior and exterior of the home, and UV paint was used to protect the material from sunlight.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/a28209163/recycled-water-bottle-house/


This practical reuse of plastic water bottles is a super idea!
But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

AGelbert

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Insulated Studs? This is a BIG Innovation in Framing!
1,048,943 views


Matt Risinger
Published on May 31, 2019

In this video, Matt travels to Minnesota to see a house framed with a new innovation in framing that solves the Thermal Bridge issue with typical 2x solid studs.  You don't want to miss this Build Show!

Go to https://www.tstud.com - FYI - This video has overloaded their small company with inquiries so please be patient with their response times. 

TSTUD Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/thetstud/

Huge thanks to our Show sponsors Polywall, Huber, Dorken Delta, Prosoco, Rockwool & Viewrail for helping to make these videos possible! These are all trusted companies that Matt has worked with for years and trusts their products in the homes he builds.  We would highly encourage you to check out their websites for more info. 

http://www.Poly-Wall.com
http://www.Dorken.com
http://www.Huberwood.com
http://www.Prosoco.com
https://www.Viewrail.com
https://www.Rockwool.com

Category People & Blogs
But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

 

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