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Author Topic: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:  (Read 3848 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #45 on: October 02, 2015, 03:52:56 pm »
10/01/2015 01:56 PM     

California Blasts Through Historic Climate Legislation  ;D

SustainableBusiness.com News

California's legislature has been busy lately passing historic climate bills, the latest of which brings solar to low-income communities - typically the last to benefit. 

Notably, this summer, the legislature passed Senate Bill 350, which puts Governor Brown's proposed new targets into law. The Renewable Portfolio Standard now requires 50% renewable energy by 2030 (up from 33%) and calls for doubling building energy efficiency by then.

 At this year's inaugural address, Governor Brown said, "With California on track to reach 33% renewable energy by 2020, a cap-and-trade system that prices carbon, and strong incentives for cleaner transportation, "it is time to establish our next set of objectives for 2030 and beyond." 

He proposed 3 goals for 2030, two of which are now law:
•50% renewable electricity!
•50% cut in petroleum use in cars and trucks
•Doubled efficiency in existing buildings and cleaner heating fuels.


Since then, he issued an executive order that requires California to cut greenhouse gas emissions 40% by 2030, below 1990 levels, making it possible to reach the ultimate goal of 80% cuts by 2050, said Brown. The goals are the same as the European Union and are what's needed to keep temperature rise from exceeding 2 degrees C.

The state is already following through, having signed contracts to convert 23 state office buildings - including the Capitol - to 100% renewable electricity.  ;D

New Laws Benefit Low Income Communities 

Under the Multi-Family Affordable Housing Solar Roofs program, the state will spend up to $100 million a year for at least a decade to install solar systems on 210,000 affordable housing units.

Another bill returns a portion of fines levied against polluters to the communities they polluted, usually low-income neighborhoods.   


And another bill makes it more difficult to locate hazardous waste facilities in poor neighborhoods.


Poor neighborhoods will also benefit from building retrofits that make their homes more comfortable, while significantly lowering energy bills.


Cutting Oil Consumption   ;D

But the oil lobby managed to kill the third leg of Governor's Brown's proposal - cutting oil consumption 50% by 2030. As usual, they spent millions of dollars on misleading television ads and mailers convincing people that "minivans would be banned" and gasoline would be rationed.

Governor Brown responded: "This is one skirmish, but it's increasing the intensity of my commitment to do everything I can to make sure we reduce oil consumption in California. My zeal has been intensified to a maximum degree."

Since then, however, the California Air Resources Board re-adopted the low carbon fuel standard - a key part of meeting the Governor's goal. It requires transportation fuels to decline in carbon intensity 10% by 2020. It works by setting annual carbon intensity targets (based on a lifecycle analysis of various fuels), which decline each year.

California also has goals for zero emissions vehicles (elec­tric, fuel cell), requiring 2.7% of new cars sold this year, and reaching 22% in 2025. 

If the state were a country, it would rank #2 for its low-carbon economy.

Impact on Manufacturing?  ???

For those who wonder whether these policies are harming the economy, a report by Next 10 shows otherwise.

 Utility bills are dropping for homes (among the lowest in the US) and businesses, and California continues to be the top state for manufacturing  - leading on productivity, exports, and jobs. Costs are not rising for manufacturers and there isn't a mass exodus as lobbyists - such as the oil industry front group, Californians for Affordable and Reliable Energy (CARE), warn.

In fact, California's manufacturing sector has grown three times faster than the rest of the US over the past decade at 15% versus 5%, and more offshore businesses have returned to California than any other state.

Read our article, Most Ambitious Climate Goals Lead to Greatest Economic Growth.

Agelbert NOTE: The above statement is the best kept secret that the fossil fuel industry tries to KEEP secret 24/7. WHY? Because fossil fuels were NEVER cheap. Renewable energy IS, and ALWAYS WAS, and ALWAYS SHALL BE, more cost effective than poisoning the biosphere for short term gain!

Read the report, California's Manufacturing & Benefits of Energy Efficiency:
 
Website: http://next10.org/sites/next10.huang.radicaldesigns.org/files/090215%20manu%20final.pdf

http://www.sustainablebusiness.com/index.cfm/go/news.display/id/26423
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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #46 on: December 04, 2015, 03:06:12 pm »
Uruguay Powers Nearly 100% of Electricity From Renewables

Cole Mellino | December 4, 2015 9:39 am

http://ecowatch.com/2015/12/04/uruguay-renewable-energy/
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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #47 on: December 15, 2015, 03:43:33 pm »
This U.S. Town Plans to Disconnect From the Grid and Go 100 Percent Renewables  ;D

Cole Mellino | December 15, 2015 1:56 pm


Nassau, New York, a town of 5,000 people just outside of Albany, New York, plans to disconnect from the electrical grid. Last week, the town board voted to get 100 percent of its power from renewables by 2020. The town is making the move both as a way to “increase its reliance on renewable sources of energy and to gain some energy independence,” Politico New York reported.

Nassau, New York plans to use a combination of rooftop solar, ground-mounted solar systems, wind turbines and methane-capture at landfill to generate its electricity.


“If all goes as planned, within the next four years, all six of the town buildings will be disconnected from the grid,” said Nassau Supervisor Dave Fleming. The rest of the town is developing a plan to get all of its power from renewable sources in the next four years.

“It’s not the be-all to end-all for what we should be doing as a state and a nation, but it’s a good first step,” he said. “From a practical perspective, it’s possible,” he added. “We have a lot of ‘people resources’ in our community.”

The town plans to use a combination of rooftop and ground-mounted solar, wind turbines and methane-capture from the landfill to generate its energy.

Though the tiny town’s transition to renewables may not have the impact of, say, New York City going fossil-fuel-free (Mayor Bill de Blasio has pledged for municipal operations to run on 100 percent renewable energy before 2050), it’s just one of many cities and towns around the world making the transition.

New York State even has a program to help municipalities make that transition. Spokesman Jon Sorensen told Politico:

“The state Department of Public Services wants more towns to follow Nassau’s lead. Through its Reforming Energy Vision (REV) initiative, the Cuomo administration is actively working to help municipalities—especially towns and schools—move toward getting a significant portion of their power from renewable resources. REV is designed to make the energy grid more efficient and increase its reliance on renewables, and it is intended to give consumers more choices than they have now. This is exactly the kind of thing REV is hoping to encourage. Smaller, cleaner power systems are less costly and cleaner alternatives to the bigger power stations that have made up the power grid.”

And it’s not just New York. More than 350 U.S. state and local elected officials from nearly every state signed a letter during the Paris climate conference calling for 50 percent clean energy by 2030 and 100 percent clean energy by 2050.

Today, San Diego, California’s city council is voting on a proposed plan to get 100 percent of its energy from renewable sources by 2035. It’s expected to pass. Vancouver, Las Vegas and other major cities around the world want to go 100 percent renewable, too. Hawaii pledged to go 100 percent renewable by 2045—the most ambitious standard set by a U.S. state thus far. Several other islands, including Aruba, Belize, St. Lucia, Grenada, the British Virgin Islands, the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, and San Andres and Providencia have pledged to go 100 percent renewable, as well, through the Ten Island Challenge, created by Richard Branson’s climate group the Carbon War Room.

Several countries around the world have hit impressive benchmarks for renewables in just a few short years. And many places have already made the transition to fossil-fuel-free electricity. Samso in Denmark became the world’s first island to go all in on renewables several years ago. Most recently, Uruguay, three U.S. cities—Burlington, Vermont; Aspen, Colorado; and Greensburg, Kansas—along with Kodiak Island, Alaska, have all made the transition.

Greenpeace and researchers at Stanford and UC Berkeley have laid out plans for every state in the U.S. to adopt 100 percent renewables and a Greenpeace report published in September posits the world can achieve 100 percent renewable energy by 2050. Mark Jacobson, one of the researchers from Stanford, said the barriers to 100 percent clean energy are social and political, not technical or economic.

The International Energy Agency released a report in October that found a quarter of the world will be powered by renewables by 2020. And a report from the International Renewable Energy Agency found that the transition to a sustainable energy future by 2030 is “technically feasible and economically viable.”

http://ecowatch.com/2015/12/15/nassau-off-grid-renewables/


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AGelbert

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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #48 on: December 15, 2015, 07:01:02 pm »
This U.S. Town Plans to Disconnect From the Grid and Go 100 Percent Renewables  ;D

Cole Mellino | December 15, 2015 1:56 pm


Nassau, New York, a town of 5,000 people just outside of Albany, New York, plans to disconnect from the electrical grid. Last week, the town board voted to get 100 percent of its power from renewables by 2020. The town is making the move both as a way to “increase its reliance on renewable sources of energy and to gain some energy independence,” Politico New York reported.

Nassau, New York plans to use a combination of rooftop solar, ground-mounted solar systems, wind turbines and methane-capture at landfill to generate its electricity.


“If all goes as planned, within the next four years, all six of the town buildings will be disconnected from the grid,” said Nassau Supervisor Dave Fleming. The rest of the town is developing a plan to get all of its power from renewable sources in the next four years.

“It’s not the be-all to end-all for what we should be doing as a state and a nation, but it’s a good first step,” he said. “From a practical perspective, it’s possible,” he added. “We have a lot of ‘people resources’ in our community.”

The town plans to use a combination of rooftop and ground-mounted solar, wind turbines and methane-capture from the landfill to generate its energy.

Though the tiny town’s transition to renewables may not have the impact of, say, New York City going fossil-fuel-free (Mayor Bill de Blasio has pledged for municipal operations to run on 100 percent renewable energy before 2050), it’s just one of many cities and towns around the world making the transition.

New York State even has a program to help municipalities make that transition. Spokesman Jon Sorensen told Politico:

“The state Department of Public Services wants more towns to follow Nassau’s lead. Through its Reforming Energy Vision (REV) initiative, the Cuomo administration is actively working to help municipalities—especially towns and schools—move toward getting a significant portion of their power from renewable resources. REV is designed to make the energy grid more efficient and increase its reliance on renewables, and it is intended to give consumers more choices than they have now. This is exactly the kind of thing REV is hoping to encourage. Smaller, cleaner power systems are less costly and cleaner alternatives to the bigger power stations that have made up the power grid.”

And it’s not just New York. More than 350 U.S. state and local elected officials from nearly every state signed a letter during the Paris climate conference calling for 50 percent clean energy by 2030 and 100 percent clean energy by 2050.

Today, San Diego, California’s city council is voting on a proposed plan to get 100 percent of its energy from renewable sources by 2035. It’s expected to pass. Vancouver, Las Vegas and other major cities around the world want to go 100 percent renewable, too. Hawaii pledged to go 100 percent renewable by 2045—the most ambitious standard set by a U.S. state thus far. Several other islands, including Aruba, Belize, St. Lucia, Grenada, the British Virgin Islands, the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, and San Andres and Providencia have pledged to go 100 percent renewable, as well, through the Ten Island Challenge, created by Richard Branson’s climate group the Carbon War Room.

Several countries around the world have hit impressive benchmarks for renewables in just a few short years. And many places have already made the transition to fossil-fuel-free electricity. Samso in Denmark became the world’s first island to go all in on renewables several years ago. Most recently, Uruguay, three U.S. cities—Burlington, Vermont; Aspen, Colorado; and Greensburg, Kansas—along with Kodiak Island, Alaska, have all made the transition.

Greenpeace and researchers at Stanford and UC Berkeley have laid out plans for every state in the U.S. to adopt 100 percent renewables and a Greenpeace report published in September posits the world can achieve 100 percent renewable energy by 2050. Mark Jacobson, one of the researchers from Stanford, said the barriers to 100 percent clean energy are social and political, not technical or economic.

The International Energy Agency released a report in October that found a quarter of the world will be powered by renewables by 2020. And a report from the International Renewable Energy Agency found that the transition to a sustainable energy future by 2030 is “technically feasible and economically viable.”

http://ecowatch.com/2015/12/15/nassau-off-grid-renewables/



edpell SAYS:
The NY town completely off grid is BS. It has been cloudy for the last two months here in New York. Their dump better make lots of methane. They make no mention of storage. Since they are disconnected they can not use the grid for backup.

It is complete BS. They will discover how expensive it will be to go it alone. My guess $0.80/KWh versus grid rate of $0.08/KWh. If they can get low rate loans. 



Listen carefully, Edpell. When you come here to post, you will provide a substantive argument for your allegations. You have not done that. You have, instead, used the term "BS" TWICE, along with the pejorative descriptive adjective (in this particular case) of "complete".

First of all, any methane harvesting technique, BY DEFINITION, can provide smoothing of grid demand when other renewable energy from wind and solar is not available. So they did not need to even mention storage, although they probably will get the Tesla powerwall versions for residents or the larger version Musk is marketing for businesses and factories.

Your "guess" of $0.80/KWh versus grid rate of %0.08/KWh is disinformation. Even when I lived at Syracuse, New York in the 1980's the grid rate was ALREADY $0.11/KWh. It's a LOT more than that now. And the mix of renewable energy that you claim will cost $0.80/KWh is grossly in error.

Not only will 100% renewable energy for Nassau be doable in the projected timeframe, but it will be CHEAPER than the fossil fuel industry CRAP they are forced to buy now.

Before you try to call "BS" on what I just wrote, you had better read the details about solar, the most expensive, relatively speaking, of the renewable energy mix including methane and wind - but still MUCH cheaper than fossil fuels! 

http://www.solarpowerrocks.com/new-york/

As to wind, that has, with 50,000 plus wind turbines now up and running in the USA, PROVEN to generate energy at LESS than $0.08/KWh.

Vermont is using what it calls "cow power", along with wind, solar and hydro, to make the transition. Green Mountain Power charges $0.18/KWH for methane generated renewable energy to those customers who want to pay it. The normal retail rate is $0.15/KWH here in Vermont and it is already generated from, at least in Colchester, over 70% renewable energy.

In Vermont, our days are every bit as cloudy as Nassau's, but we are already using solar power extensively BECAUSE IT IS CHEAPER than fossil fuel dirty energy, in addition to environmental concerns.

I am patient with people that simply disagree respectfully. I have no patience for hyperbole, disinformation and fallacious debating techniques.

It is clear that you are misinformed about the actual costs of renewable energy. You owe me an apology.
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AGelbert

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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #49 on: December 17, 2015, 04:47:15 pm »
On the independent town. I have seen no budget numbers for the project. Let's agree until some one put numbers to paper we are just talking dreams.

Let's remember cost includes salaries for linemen and executives, retirement pension and retirement medical for same. The cost of the distribution network which will have to be bought from the grid or build anew in parallel. When the temperature is -20 how much methane does the dump put out? How long will the dump last until it is completely digested? Show me one town in the US northeast that is off gird. So far all we have are assertions with no facts or figure or costs. 

Fossil fuel generated energy includes all the costs you just mentioned, and does so less profitably than when renewable energy is employed. The "fossil fuels provide jobs" claim is true for the fossil fuel industry jobs, not for jobs and retirement security for the rest of the community. That is why they are "subsidized". It is curious that you don't mention that.

When you do an apples to apples comparison of renewable energy technology with fossil fuel based energy, fossil fuel comes out more expensive. I can point you to a very detailed article explaining exactly why that is. It has a lot to do with the external combustion process versus the internal combustion process. The enthalpy given fossil fuels was deliberately conflated with that of external combustion processes to give it a higher enthalpy. That is false because ALL the waste heat is lost in the internal combustion process and ALL that heat is accounted as a plus in the external combustion process. Charles Hall and friends for the old "Oil Drum" fossil fuel propaganda web site pushed that bullshit 24/7 to make a case for their disingenuous and duplicitous claim of a higher EROEI for fossil fuels versus Renewable energy.

I gave you quite a bit of data about renewable energy and access to more. The fact that it was not stated in the article about Nassau does not mean they are not making use of it.  Renewable energy technologies are now mature enough to be competitive with the artificially cheap fossil duels. The fossil fuel industry is the one that has given us groundless assertions.

As to methane, a pig farmer in the Midwest generates methane all year round, including during subzero temperatures in the winter. Just Google it. If you want to cling to some "it can't be done" hypothesis, then you are the one into baseless assertions.

Finally, what Nassau is doing, while claiming it is going "off grid", is actually creating a large microgrid. I'm surprised you did not discern that immediately. And, as soon as the utility companies see that they cannot coerce Nassau into doing what the power companies want, they will acquiesce to Nassau's microgrid plan by offering to buy the excess capacity during the day (and certain times of the year) in order to provide smoothing for the larger grid and avoid the power company costs of peak demand which might require building another natural gas power plant. Renewable Energy PREVENTS those plants from being built. THAT is the main reason Green Mountain Power is pushing renewable energy so hard; it saves them money and increases the stock price. Renewable energy is money in the bank. That is NOT a baseless assertion.   
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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #50 on: December 17, 2015, 08:43:03 pm »
When the article said "plans to disconnect from the electrical grid". I thought they meant what they said.

You may be from New York State, but you do not understand New York politics. WHY do you think they said that, HUH!!? THINK! It's a huge loss of revenue for the power company if they do. But on the other hand, Nassau would have to provide their own power smoothing infrastructure, something all power companies already have.

The only reason NOT to go off grid is the smoothing cost, NOT whether enough Renewable energy can be generated (as you incorrectly assume). Town power smoothing is a duplication of effort. THAT is the power company's bargaining chip. But the town has a stronger bargaining chip BECAUSE Renewable Energy is so cheap and the power company does not want to lose the revenue. I predict the end result will be a microgrid that CAN be disconnected if need be but will, except in an emergency, normally remain part of the larger grid. 

If they are dealing with Niagara Mohawk, the power company that MADE SURE all new houses way back in the 1980's in Syracuse (one of which I bought) were 100% electrically heated, then you would begin to understand HOW IT WORKS there. Back in the early 1980's Niagara Mohawk had just started up a nuclear power plant and they needed to sell JUICE to the people. So, they had some nice meetings with Mufaldi home builders of Buffalo and Syracuse (and surrounding locations). The rest is history.

NOW that renewable energy technologies are mature, they want to strong arm communities to pay for dirty energy, whether it be from fossil fuels or nuclear power, at rates that ARE MORE EXPENSIVE than towns like Nassau can get If they resort to renewable energy.

Nassau responds by offering them the finger. It's a PLAN at this stage, not a REALITY. This is a New York Style bargaining technique. This is not hard to understand. It is also enough to bring the power company back to the negotiating table BECAUSE, unlike your incorrect assumption, it is DOABLE and cost effective.

That is where this conversation started. YOU cannot get it through your biosphere math challenged head that Renewable Energy is cheaper than dirty energy.

So, I will not continue to attempt to convince you of that fact. Cling to the propaganda about "cheap" fossil fuels, retirement plans, jobs, etc. ad nauseum all you wish. If you wish to be willfully ignorant, I cannot stop you.

 
Renewable is the cheaper energy option without fossil fuel and hidden nuclear subsides.
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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #51 on: December 18, 2015, 03:53:12 pm »
12/16/2015 01:24 PM   

San Diego Joins 100% Renewable Energy Club   

SustainableBusiness.com News

On the heels of the Paris Climate Agreement San Diego is following through, voting unanimously to run on 100% renewable energy by 2035.

And to cut greenhouse gas emissions 50% by then.

Other US cities have a 100% goal, but San Diego is the largest and the first to make it legally binding. San Francisco and San Jose, for example, plan to reach the same goal much faster - by 2020 and 2022, respectively.

Renewable Energy 100%   

Steps San Diego plans as part of its comprehensive Climate Action Plan include:

•aggressive build-out of renewables, attracting green corporations and jobs

•aggressive moves to net zero energy/water buildings

•advancing the "City of Villages" concept of walkable neighborhoods

•greater use of bicycles and public transit

•electric vehicles will comprise half the city's fleet by 2020 and 90% by 2035

•moving toward zero waste through more recycling and composing

•98% of methane produced by sewage and water treatment plants will be recycled instead of vented into the atmosphere
.

Many details have to be worked out, but the first step is done - to commit to the goal, says Mayor Faulconer. 

One of the great things about the vote is that it is non-partisan. While Democrats have a majority on the City Council, the Republican Mayor led the charge, calling it "the right thing to do." He sold the plan to conservative businesses by showing how it will improve the economy, create jobs and transform the electric grid, reports the NY Times. 

"100% clean energy is the new standard for climate leadership. On the heels of an historic climate agreement in Paris, we are about to see many American cities follow San Diego's leadership by going all-in on clean energy," says Michael Brune, Executive Director of Sierra Club.

Last year, San Diego Gas & Electric reached 33% renewable energy, six years before the state's 2020 deadline.

California's new goal is to reach 50% renewable energy by 2030, since it is on track to reach 33% by 2020. And the goal for emissions cuts is 40% by 2030 below 1990 levels, putting the ultimate goal of 80% cuts by 2050 within reach.   

Read our articles, Most Ambitious Climate Goals Lead to Greatest Economic Growth and

100% Renewable Energy Gaining Traction As Worldwide Goal.

Here is San Diego's Climate Action Plan:
 

Website: www.sandiego.gov/planning/genplan/cap/pdf/CAP%20Adoption%20Draft%202015.pdf

http://www.sustainablebusiness.com/index.cfm/go/news.display/id/26503
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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #52 on: January 08, 2016, 09:45:08 pm »
400% Renewable Electricity
[/center]
Community owned solar power plant Großbardorf, Photo credit: Agrokraft

Project: 100% Renewable Energy Goal Achieved - 400% Renewable Power

Bioenergy for Großbardorf: The new biogas plant with central heating and district heating network is a joint project with many participating farmers and citizens. 120 connected households are supplied with heat, the electricity will be fed into the grid, Photo credit: ReginaVossenkaul, joule.agrarheute.com

 

Location: Großbardorf, Germany


Summary:


In the small Bavarian village of Großbardorf, local citizens invested and leveraged outside capital worth $19 million over four years to develop rooftop and larger scale solar systems, along with a biogas plant that feeds both a combined heat and power (CHP) plant and a district heating network. Combined, the projects generate 400% of the electricity the village’ needs and 50% of its heating demand. Großbardorf is considering expanding to new business opportunities that rely on its advanced heating network. One example is local fish farming tanks that use heat from the biogas plants to heat the water.   

Großbardorf has been clever at motivating citizens to pitch in. For instance, when the town’s home football team moved up in the ranks, regulations called for a new stadium roof. Rather than turn to a bank or big business to finance the project, the town solicited its citizens to invest in solar panels for the new roof, in exchange for season tickets to the popular football "soccer" games. The locals went for the deal, leaving the income from the electricity produced by the solar panels to pay off the expense of  the new roof.   

Solar grandstand roofing at the soccer stadium Großbardorf, Photo credit: Agrokraft


The village's renewable energy progress would not have been possible without the Renewable Sources Act (EEG), the German feed-in tariff (FIT) law that guarantees interconnection of renewables into the grid, payment of any needed grid upgrades by the utilities, and adequate, long term payment to renewable power generators for any electricity they feed in to the grid. 

Ground-breaking ceremony for the heating network Großbardorf 01/06/2011, Photo credit: Agrokraft


http://www.go100percent.org/cms/index.php?id=77&tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=247&cHash=bed22c155ced7a5ee0a32b348dce2639

Agelbert NOTE: The feed-in tariff (FIT) that boosted Renewable energy infrastructure in Germany was frequently and vociferously OPPOSED by the "energy expert" Nicole Foss for allegedly "increasing energy costs"  . Of course, the FIT has actually helped REDUCE energy costs while it STOPPED the fossil fuel generated POLLUTION by helping to fund the switch to Renewable Energy. If you didn't know Nicole Foss is a SHILL for fossil fuels in general (and Fracking in particular), now you do know. Sorry Foss, Germany DOES understand energy and cost efficient thermodynamics, unlike YOU. 
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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #53 on: March 07, 2016, 10:18:53 pm »
Bike Washing Machine Gives Whole New Meaning to ‘Spin Cycle’     

Cole Mellino | March 5, 2016 11:58 am

Want to get a good workout and get a mundane chore out of the way—all while not using electricity? Now you can, thanks to the Bike Washing Machine, designed by students at Dalian Nationalities University in China


The Bike Washing Machine allows you to wash your clothes while you work out. Photo credit: Bike Washing Machine


Colin Levitch of BikeRadar praised the concept:

“The Tuvie Washing Machine gives the term ‘spin cycle’ a whole new meaning. Targeted at the time-starved athlete or those wishing to cut down on their utility bills, it’s essentially a spin bike, where the front wheel has been replaced with a laundry drum. As you pedal, the drum spins and gets your clothing clean.

We’re dreaming of spin class rooms filled with these, where patrons get a workout and a clean basket of clothing after their 45 minute session. Got a stubborn stain? We’re sure someone will create ‘stain intervals’ to see those gone.”

According to the designers, any excess energy generated would power the display screen or be stored for later use.

Its small size would probably require multiple loads to complete your laundry, The Huffington Post pointed out. And Levitch noted there are a few key details missing: Do you need to run a water pipe to the bike or does it need to be manually filled? How do you drain the water?   

Still, the concept offers a promising way to combine exercise and a carbon-free energy source to clean your dirty clothes.

There are other pedal-powered washing machine designs, including one designed specifically for the billions around the world without access to running water or electricity. 


http://ecowatch.com/2016/03/05/bike-washing-machine/
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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #54 on: May 17, 2016, 12:16:44 am »
Portugal powered for 4 days by 100% Renewable Electricity  ;D

from May 7th (6:45am) to May 11th (5:45pm)

Portugal was powered by 100% renewable electricity, according to the  National Energy Network (REN) and the Portuguese  Renewable Energy Association (APREN). (Associação Sistema Terrestre Sustentável em colaboração com a Associação Portuguesa de Energias Renováveis (APREN) -)
 
"the consumption of electricity in Portugal was fully covered by renewable sources" (ZERO)

António Sá Costa, President ASREN, points out that this milestone "is also a testament to what is possible for all the doubters ," adding that
Quote
" today , more than half of the electricity consumed in about half a year is from renewables
(Dinheiro)


More information in Portuguese (ZERO)

& (Dinheiro)

http://www.go100percent.org/cms/index.php?id=45&tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=420&cHash=e333f4eca2d5bbcc54e8bfd19705cb02
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AGelbert

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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #55 on: May 17, 2016, 03:45:34 pm »
57% of Scotland’s energy came from renewables in 2015

The very clever (and penny pinching) people in Scotland have been making good use of all kinds of renewable energy, including tidal power.



Scotland closed its last coal burning power plant last month. They now generate more than 50% of their power from renewable sources. Scotland`s intermediate term goal is to obtain 100% of their power from renewable energy. Their longer term goal is to get 100%+ of their power from renewable energy with the excess power being exported to England and Wales. 

”Clean energy proponents are praising the success of the Scottish National Party’s renewable energy initiatives, and holding up the new statistics as proof that the nation could become the EU’s first fully renewable electricity nation by 2030. WWF Scotland’s director, Lang Banks, told Herald Scotland
Quote
Independent research has shown that it is possible for Scotland to have a secure, efficient electricity system, based on almost entirely renewable electricity generation,
by 2030. Embracing that vision would maximize the opportunities to create new jobs, empower communities and support local economic renewal    throughout the country.” 


http://inhabitat.com/57-of-scotlands-energy-came-from-renewables-in-2015/

Agelbert NOTE: There is NO WAY that the fossil fuel industry will EVER be able to recapture their lost energy use market share in ANY of the high Renewable Energy percentage countries like Scotland (and Portugal and Costa Rica and Spain and the Netherlands and Sweden and Norway and Germany - and so one, etc.), no matter how many politicians they BUY to make fossil fuels artificially cheap through hidden and not so hidden "subsidies" (free passes on pollution and government money coerced from we-the-people).

And smart people in the USA, England, France, Australia, south Africa, Italy, Japan (and so on - you get the idea) are certainly NOT going to go back to fossil fuels with a ZERO fuel cost on their current Renewable energy Infrastructure (which gets cheaper to manufacture and install every year). Even the "natural" gas fired power plants used for peak power grid demand balancing that now use Fracked gas can be run from TRULY NATURAL gas produced from methane harvesters on cattle and pig farms in these countries. Germany is already doing quite a bit of animal based methane harvesting with a nice side benefit that pumps out a NON-fossil fuel based NATURAL fertilizer product added profit stream.  ;D

Continually shrinking market share is a death sentence for an energy producer. That is why the fossil fuel industry is doomed to shrink into bankrupt welfare queen, has been irrelevance.            

Anybody that thinks we are in a repeat of the 1980's doesn't know their ass from a hole in the ground.

 
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AGelbert

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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #56 on: May 31, 2016, 03:39:17 pm »
Santiago’s Metro System to Become World’s First to Be Powered Largely by Solar and Wind

Lorraine Chow | May 31, 2016 10:49 am

The subway system in Chile’s capital will soon be the world’s first to run largely on renewable energy sources.

Santiago’s metro has 103 kilometers of tracks and 108 stations, making it the second-longest metro system in Latin America after Mexico City.

The Metro de Santiago, the second-longest metro system in Latin America after Mexico City, has signed two agreements, one with a solar energy provider and another with a wind power company, which will provide 60 percent of metro’s energy needs by 2018.

An announcement of the $500 million deal was made last week by Chilean President Michelle Bachelet during a visit to the National Stadium station that’s currently under construction.

“More than two and a half million passengers use the Metro daily,” she said. “[They] will not only be able to travel faster and safer; they will also be able to travel in a means of transport that cares for the planet, which reduces our carbon footprint and that makes possible a sustainable future for all.”

Chile’s President Michelle Bachelet announces on May 23 that the Metro de Santiago will become the world’s first metro to run mostly on renewables. Photo credit: SunPower Corp (graphic at article link)

California solar company SunPower, an affiliate of French oil company Total, will begin construction of the El Pelícano Solar Project, a 100-megawatt facility near the municipalities of La Higuera and Vallenar. The solar plant, expected to go live by the end of 2017, will supply 300 gigawatt hours per year of clean energy to Metro de Santiago, or 42 percent of its annual energy demands.

“SunPower is proud to serve Metro of Santiago’s growing energy demand with cost-competitive, renewable solar power,” Eduardo Medina, the executive vice president of SunPower’s global power plants, said. “Solar is an ideal energy source for Chile because of the country’s high solar resource and transparent energy policies. In partnership with Total, SunPower is committed to the continued growth of our business in Chile.”

As for wind power, the metro will receive 18 percent of its energy needs from a 185-megawatt San Juan wind project developed by Spain-based Elecnor and owned by Brazilian renewable energy firm Latin America Power, according to Quartz.

Quartz noted that both solar and wind projects will start service in 2018 and supply the metro for the next 15 years. The metro will receive its remaining 40 percent of its energy needs from the Chilean electric distribution company Chilectra.

The Natural Resources Defense Council noted that the amount of energy generated by the wind and solar projects for the metro will be equivalent to the energy needs of 104,000 homes. Not only that, the impressive initiative is expected to mitigate 130,000 tons of CO2 emissions annually.

http://ecowatch.com/2016/05/31/santiago-metro-system-solar-wind/
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AGelbert

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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #57 on: September 17, 2016, 01:37:47 pm »


BOB KLEIN ON THE CULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL
 TRADEOFFS OF OUR ENERGY CHOICES

(Editor’s note: The following comes from the recent Vermont Folklife Center exhibit, Portraits in Action: Pioneers in Renewable Energy, Environmental Conservation, and Land Use Planning. For more, visit their website.)
Bob Klein, the first director of Vermont Chapter of the Nature Conservancy, makes an argument for thinking big and stretching beyond our comfort collective zone—listen below (at article link) —then read his response to the question: What will bring us to the next level in meeting the energy and environmental challenges we are facing today?

What will bring us to the next level in meeting the energy and environmental challenges we are facing today?

Whatever energy sources we utilize in Vermont inevitably will have cultural and environmental consequences. Whether we like it or not, with energy development there’s no free lunch. There have always been tradeoffs.
Quote
Having discovered that the environmental cost of burning fossil fuel is unacceptable, we’ll transition to other energy sources, and make new tradeoffs over the decades to come.
Meeting “the next level of environmental and energy challenges” should involve confronting these tradeoffs consciously. There’s room to decide what impacts we’re willing to accept. We can weigh the consequences of certain energy choices against things we value – local control, scenery and open space, prime ag soils, natural areas, and recreational access to land, for example. Some energy choices could even have an impact on Vermont’s rural character itself.

We may be facing a climate emergency, but this need not lead to a suspension of the rules. We do not have to leave the adoption and siting of alternative energy sources to chance. Like other kinds of development, state, regional, and local planning can steer renewable energy installations away from other things that we value. Geographic Information Systems and resource mapping tools have never been more widely available. We just need to use these tools, together with an enabling policy framework, to meet the challenges before us.

Portraits in Action: Pioneers in Renewable Energy, Environmental Conservation, and Land Use Planning brings together a diverse cross section of twenty-five pioneers, activists, and leaders in renewable energy, environmental conservation, and land use planning, and invites them to speak to the issues at hand. It is both an oral history and a call to action.

The Vermont Folklife Center’s mission is to broaden, strengthen, and deepen our understanding of Vermont and the surrounding region; to assure a repository for our collective cultural memory; and to strengthen communities by building connections among the diverse peoples of Vermont. For more, visit us.

http://vtdigger.org/2016/09/16/vermont-folklife-center-portraits-action-bob-klein/
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AGelbert

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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #58 on: September 29, 2016, 07:21:49 pm »

September 16, 2016 | 11:32 AM

Video: Costa Rica’s Last Green Mile 


Read the story of how Costa Rica became a clean energy leader and one of the greenest nations on Earth

Imagine an entire country powered by 100-percent renewable energy. For Costa Rica, that’s nearly a reality.

Costa Rica’s environmental minister, Edgar Gutiérrez, recently explained to us that "Costa Rica is on a path that seeks development, but only development in a healthy environment.” As part of this effort, the country has plans to go carbon neutral by 2021, and officials have stated that it has already reached 81 percent of this goal. If Costa Rica succeeds, it will be one of the few carbon-neutral countries in the world.

You don’t have to look far to see how Costa Rica is breaking all kinds of renewable energy records. In 2015, the nation achieved 99 percent renewable energy generation, with its grid powered by only renewable sources for a remarkable 285 days. And it’s on a similar track in 2016, powering its grid on 100 percent renewable energy for 150 days and counting.

But Costa Rica wasn’t always as focused on protecting its environment and the climate. In the mid-twentieth century, Costa Rica was losing its native woodlands – mostly tropical rainforests – to logging at an alarming rate, with the country’s  forest cover dropping from 75 percent in 1940 to 21 percent in 1987. In the 1980s and 1990s, Costa Rica’s leaders realized the nation needed to do something to reverse this process. So they developed a program that gave incentives to land owners to protect their environments. The result? By 2010, Costa Rica’s forest cover was back up to 52 percent.

The impulse to protect the country’s extraordinary natural environment has been complimented by a focus on clean energy. So what does Costa Rica use to power its grid? The answer is not as obvious as many people might think. Thanks to its river systems and generally plentiful rainfall, between 70–75 percent of the nation’s electricity comes from hydropower, with the rest of its renewables coming from geothermal, biomass, wind, and solar.

Costa Rica is also focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions through major changes with its transportation sector, which makes up 32 percent of the country’s emissions and 67 percent of its fuel consumption. In 2015, Costa Rica established a buy-back program for older cars and trucks in exchange for new, fuel-efficient vehicles. According to Gutiérrez, reducing emissions from the transportation sector is necessary to meet the country’s carbon neutrality goals by 2021.

Costa Rica is a leader in clean energy. Not only has the country reached 81 percent of its carbon-neutrality goal, but it’s done so while reducing overall power costs, which fell 12 percent in 2015 thanks to an abundance of renewables.

[/b]Costa Rica’s energy leaders don’t expect the country to slow down anytime soon when it comes to renewables – and we don’t either. And best of all, Costa Rica’s renewable energy progress shows the rest of the world that transitioning from fossil fuel-based electricity to renewables is possible – and that’s a reason a celebrate.

Help tell Costa Rica’s clean energy success story by sharing the graphic below (at article link) and networks. Then, be sure to sign up for our email activist list to stay updated with the latest on renewable energy and climate solutions.

https://www.climaterealityproject.org/blog/video-costa-rica-last-green-mile

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AGelbert

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Re: A High-Renewables Tomorrow, Today:
« Reply #59 on: November 16, 2016, 01:39:19 pm »
Energy| Nov. 12, 2016 10:48AM EST


Aruba Commits to 100% Renewable Energy

Yale Climate Connections

  http://www.ecowatch.com/aruba-renewable-energy-2089477899.html
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