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Author Topic: Nuclear Insecurity Today  (Read 2616 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Nuclear Insecurity Today
« on: January 13, 2014, 01:10:35 am »
Cesium-137 is a threat to human health

The human body thinks Cesium-137 that it finds in food you eat is POTASSIUM. So if you NEED POTASSIUM at the time you eat that food, you will incorporate a future cancer into your tissues. If you do not need it, you MIGHT be able to excrete it before it becomes part of you. California is considering fertilizing large vegetable crop areas that are becoming increasingly contaminated with ce-137 with Potassium Cholride (KCl). The reason for this is that plants supposedly will take up the KCL instead of the ce-137. We'll see.

Over the long term, the big threat to human health is cesium-137, which has a half-life of 30 years.
At that rate of disintegration, John Emsley wrote in “Nature’s Building Blocks” (Oxford, 2001), “it takes over 200 years to reduce it to 1 percent of its former level.”

It is cesium-137 that still contaminates much of the land in Ukraine around the Chernobyl reactor.

Cesium-137 mixes easily with water and is chemically similar to potassium. It thus mimics how potassium gets metabolized in the body and can enter through many foods, including milk.

The Environmental Protection Agency says that … once dispersed in the environment … cesium-137 “is impossible to avoid.”


Cesium-137 is light enough to be carried by the wind a substantial distance. And it is being carried by ocean currents towards the West Coast of North America.


Fortunately – while little-known in the medical community – other harmless minerals can help “saturate” our bodies so as to minimize the uptake of other harmful types of radiation.

The U.S. Department of Defense’s Army Medical Department Center and School explained in its book Medical Consequences of Radiological and Nuclear Weapons (Chapter 4):

Quote
One of the keys to a successful treatment outcome is to reduce or eliminate the uptake of internalized radionuclides before they can reach the critical organ.

The terms “blocking” or “diluting” agent can, in most cases, be used interchangeably. These compounds reduce the uptake of a radionuclide by saturating binding sites with a stable, nonradioactive element, thereby diluting the deleterious effect of the radioisotope.

For example, potassium iodide is the FDA-recommended treatment to prevent radioactive iodine from being sequestered in the thyroid…. Nonradioactive strontium compounds may also be used to block the uptake of radioactive strontium.

In addition, elements with chemical properties similar to the internalized radio-nuclide are often used as blocking agents. For example, calcium, and to a lesser extent phosphorus, can be used to block uptake of radioactive strontium.


Agelbert NOTE: I don't trust the U.S. Army's DEFINITION of "successful" treatment against radiation. Do you?

I agree there ARE blocking agents and they CAN limit our exposure somewhat. We are Guinea pigs and will have to find out the hard way how much we can block these radioactive poisons. The USA was contaminated with Ce-137 during the above ground nuclear explosion period of several decades.

Deposition maps were made. They are OUT OF DATE as of Chernobyl, never mind Fukushima! We need new maps. Don't hold your breath waiting for out gooberment to have them made...


Institute for Energy and Environmental Research, © 2014
Fact Sheet on Fallout Report and Related Maps

 
States containing counties with the highest Cs-137 deposition include:
Arkansas   Iowa   Oregon   Utah      California   Missouri   Pennsylvania   Vermont      Idaho   New Hampshire   South Dakota   Washington Indiana   North Carolina   Tennessee   Wyoming   


Counties in other states throughout the eastern half of the United States received substantial Cs-137 deposition. A larger number of states have counties that received substantial thyroid doses of radioactive iodine from NTS tests.


The CDC/NCI study included tests conducted between 1951 and 1962. This means that:

Chinese tests were not included (1964 to 1980)

French atmospheric tests after 1962 were not included. Hence all French atmospheric tests in the Pacific were not included. (France conducted atmospheric tests from 1960 until 1974.)

The pre-1951 tests in the Marshall Islands and the Soviet Union, the 1945 New Mexico test, and the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings were not included.

Ventings from underground tests in the United States or the Soviet Union were not included.
  >:( :P

Calculations for Alaska and Hawaii have not been done. Alaska may have had quite a bit of fallout from Novaya Zemlya. Hawaii may have had fallout from the Marshall Islands tests. These two states need to be included in future work. They were not included because of the limitations of this feasibility stage of the study. These two states would involve different sets of data. Fallout would also be expected in other places, for instance Canada.

This is ONE of several FALLOUT maps you can view at the link:


Cesium-137 deposition density due to global fallout

Fallout Maps (provided to IEER by CDC in February 2002)

Locations of sites having greater than one megaton total tests conducted prior to 1963

Preliminary estimates of total radiation dose to red bone marrow of children born 1 January 1951

from Nevada Test Site and global fallout for all radionuclides

Total (external + internal) dose to red bone marrow of an adult from global fallout

Total (external + internal) dose to red bone marrow of an adult from Nevada Test Site tests

Cesium-137 deposition density due to global fallout

Cesium-137 deposition density due to Nevada Test Site tests


Notes:
48 contiguous states only, based on cumulative exposures between 1951 and 2000, does not account for all nuclear tests as explained above ↩ Return
Estimated by IEER by assuming a 5% mortality rate from thyroid cancer. ↩ Return
Rounded best estimate of 11,000-212,000 estimated range, obtained by taking geometric mean. ↩ Return
From radionuclides such as carbon-14, tritium, cesium-137.
Rounded to one or two significant figures as indicated.

FULL DETAILS HERE:
http://ieer.org/resource/nuclear-testing/fact-sheet-fallout-report-related/

A "study" on some poor beagles: (neoplasms are growths)
Quote
/LABORATORY ANIMALS:

Chronic Exposure or Carcinogenicity/ The toxicity of cesium-137 in the beagle dog was investigated... as part of programs to evaluate the biological effects of both radionuclides in atomic bomb fallout and internally deposited fission-product radionuclides. ...

63 dogs in three age groups (15 juveniles, 142-151 days old; 38 young adults, 388-427 days old; and 10 middle-aged dogs, 1387-2060 days old) were given cesium-137 intravenously at levels (61-162 MBq/kg) near those expected to be lethal within 30 days after injection. There were 17 control dogs from the same colony.

Twenty-three of the dogs injected with cesium-137, including all middle-aged dogs, died within 52 days after injection due to hematopoietic cell damage resulting in severe pancytopenia that led to fatal hemorrhage and/or septicemia. The other significant early effect was damage to the germinal epithelium of the seminiferous tubules of all male dogs. ...

The most significant non-neoplastic late effects in the cesium-137-injected dogs... were atrophy of the germinal epithelium of seminiferous tubules with azoospermia, and a significant dose-dependent decrease in survival. ...Numerous neoplasms occurred at many different sites in the dogs injected with cesium-137... .

Two differences in the findings of the two studies were that

(1) there was an increased risk for malignant thyroid neoplasms in /one group of/ ... male dogs injected with cesium-137, but not the... dogs /in the other study/ and

(2) there was an increased relative risk for benign neoplasms excluding mammary neoplasms in /one group of/... dogs injected with cesium-137, but not /in the other group/. ...In both groups, there were dose-related increased incidences of malignant neoplasms, malignant neoplasms excluding mammary neoplasms, all sarcomas considered as a group, all non-mammary carcinomas considered as a group and malignant liver neoplasms.

In summary, the similarity of the findings between the two studies and the dose-response relationships for survival and for large groupings of neoplasms suggests that these results are consistent findings in cesium-137-injected dogs and might be dose-related late effects in humans exposed to sufficient amounts of internally deposited cesium-137. /Cesium-137/
[Nikula KJ et al; Radiat Res 146 (5): 536-47 (1996)] **PEER REVIEWED** PubMed Abstract

Agelbert NOTE: "MIGHT be dose-related in humans exposed" is SCIENTIST SPEAK for covering their asses about the TRUTH that humans are every bit as dose dependent as the dogs are. 



We are going need a LOT of Ce-137 absorbing mushrooms if the KCL doesn't cut it.

The human body is 0.4% potassium. That may not seem like a lot but it is in every single cell we have, SO, if ce-137 sneaks in, it will destroy DNA all over the place.

Check out how IMPORTANT to our body POTASSIUM is and how the food that has it that we need will uptake ce-137 as easily as WE DO thinking it is Potassium! That means mutations in the food and in us out the YING YANG, get it?




Quote

Potassium is a mineral that is needed for your body to work properly. It is a type of electrolyte.

Function

Potassium is a very important mineral to the human body.

Your body needs potassium to:
•Build proteins
•Break down and use carbohydrates
•Build muscle
•Maintain normal body growth
•Control the electrical activity of the heart
•Control the acid-base balance

Food Sources

Many foods contain potassium. All meats (red meat and chicken) and fish such as salmon, cod, flounder, and sardines are good sources of potassium. Soy products and veggie burgers are also good sources of potassium.

Vegetables including broccoli, peas, lima beans, tomatoes, potatoes (especially their skins), sweet potatoes, and winter squashes are all good sources of potassium.

Fruits that contain significant sources of potassium include citrus fruits, cantaloupe, bananas, kiwi, prunes, and apricots. Dried apricots contain more potassium than fresh apricots.

Milk and yogurt, as well as nuts, are also excellent sources of potassium.

People with kidney problems, especially those on dialysis, should not eat too many potassium-rich foods. The doctor or nurse will recommend a special diet.

Side Effects

Having too much or too little potassium in the body can have very serious consequences.

A low blood level of potassium is called hypokalemia. It can cause weak muscles, abnormal heart rhythms, and a slight rise in blood pressure. You may have hypokalemia if you:
•Take diuretics (water pills) for the treatment of high blood pressure or heart failure
•Take too many laxatives
•Have severe or prolonged vomiting and diarrhea
•Have certain kidney or adrenal gland disorders

Too much potassium in the blood is known as hyperkalemia. It may cause abnormal and dangerous heart rhythms. Some common causes include:
•Poor kidney function
•Heart medicines called angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin 2 receptor blockers (ARBs)
•Potassium-sparing diuretics (water pills) such as spironolactone or amiloride
•Severe infection

Recommendations

The Food and Nutrition Center of the Institute of Medicine has established the following recommended dietary intakes for potassium:

Infants
•0 - 6 months: 0.4 grams a day (g/day)
•7 - 12 months: 0.7 g/day

Children and Adolescents
•1 - 3 years: 3 g/day
•4 - 8 years: 3.8 g/day
•9 - 13 years: 4.5 g/day
•14 - 18 years: 4.7 g/day

Adults
•Age 19 and older: 4.7 g/day



http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002413.htm
« Last Edit: January 13, 2014, 03:01:21 pm by AGelbert »
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