Renewable Revolution

Freedom & Democracy => Geopolitics => Topic started by: AGelbert on March 02, 2018, 11:02:23 pm

Title: China
Post by: AGelbert on March 02, 2018, 11:02:23 pm
(http://therealnews.com/t2/templates/gk_twn/images/logo3.png)

March 2, 2018

How Did Communist China Become a Capitalist Superpower?

In his new book, "Competing Economic Paradigms in China," Steve Cohn examines how China's economic policy went from Maoist to "iron rice bowl" to neoliberal

https://youtu.be/mf7Lzqrq2ho

Steve Cohn is the author of 3 books: Too Cheap to Meter: An Economic and Philosophical Analysis of the Nuclear Dream; Reintroducing Macroeconomics: A Critical Approach; and Competing Economic Paradigms in China: The Co-Evolution of Economic Events, Economic Theory and Economics Education, 1976-2016, published by Routledge Press. He is interested in the sociology of economic knowledge, that is how economic theory and economic analysis are influenced by social and historical contexts."

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=21218%27%20style=%27color:#000;
Title: Re: China
Post by: AGelbert on May 02, 2018, 05:33:45 pm
Spotlight Soybeans: Bunge CEO "China Deliberately Not Buying US Products"

(http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/chinese-emoticon-22648577.jpg)

https://www.themaven.net/mishtalk/economics/spotlight-soybeans-bunge-ceo-china-deliberately-not-buying-us-products-9RN5BMWw60OHO0lreRYG1g/
Title: Re: China
Post by: AGelbert on July 11, 2018, 12:12:24 pm
Trump's 🦀 Bite 🦍 May Be Worse Than His Bark: Stockman Slams "Absurd, Dangerous, Stupid" Policies

Wed, 07/11/2018 - 10:45

Via Global Macro Monitor,

Excellent CNBC interview with David Stockman, President Reagan’s head of OMB, who speaks his mind and never holds back.    Some dismiss him as a perma-bear and doomsayer.

We certainly don’t, just has been a bit early, like every analyst and economist worth their salt.   His analysis and model are sound.

By the way, if you ever meet someone who claims they always top tick or buy every bottom,  and have perfect timing, run as fast as you can.

Moreover, the former “beltway boy wonder” doesn’t have to make his money trading and can maintain his conviction without going bankrupt or losing his career.   He will eventually be right.   It’s all timing, my friends.

Listening to him today, we respect him even more for his intellectual honesty.   We have always perceived Mr. Stockman as a supporter of the president, but we could be wrong.

He never allows his politics to warp his analysis.  Rare and refreshing.

Taken To Woodshed

He was famously “taken to the woodshed” by President Reagan for his statements in a 1981 Atlantic Monthly article, that
Quote
“supply-side economics — the backbone of the Reagan economic revolution 😈 👹 – was a ‘Trojan horse’ 🐎 that would ultimately benefit  💵 🎩 🍌 the rich.”

He laid it all out there today and held nothing back. (http://renewablerevolution.createaforum.com/gallery/renewablerevolution/3-130418202709.png)  (http://www.clker.com/cliparts/c/8/f/8/11949865511933397169thumbs_up_nathan_eady_01.svg.hi.png)

(http://renewablerevolution.createaforum.com/styles/renewablerevolution/files/852_trade%20war.png)

Massive trade war won't solve deficits, says former Reagan WH budget director from CNBC.

Money quotes from today’s interview *

Imbalances are not the result of bad trade deals

We have had 43 straight years of large and growing current account deficits, that is a monetary issue

A trade war is not going to solve it…let interest rates find their right level

The fact is, we are heading into a massive trade war in the world

Trump doesn’t know what he’s doing at all. He is making it up. He is a hopeless protectionist with a 17th-century view of the world

We have an absurd policy — dangerous, stupid. The worst that I’ve seen since my whole career started in 1970 under [President Richard] Nixon, and he did some crazy things

The market marches to new highs until it doesn’t

In 1990…the average tariff in China was about 30 percent, the average tariff in China today is 3 ½ percent. It is not an issue

What they [Trump administration] are objecting to is China’s policy of “no ticky, no washy.” In other words, if you want to come to China and do business, you have to be in a joint venture and share your technology

If somebody wants to go to China so they can come on CNBC and brag they are in a growth market then they ought to put up with the local regulations

Don’t start a trade war and throw the soybean farmer under the bus because of some big business lobby in Washington is whining about China’s terms of business

*the interview was concluded before the announcement of a 10 percent on an additional $200 billion of Chinese imports was published by the USTR after the market close. 


Tough words.

No Reagan Moment On Free Trade

Sorry,  Mohamed,  we love you but there will be no “Reagan Moment” for International Trade.  We hope we are wrong, and we could be, but we don’t think so.       

Trump is no Reagan, the ultimate free-trader.   Larry Kudlow and Stephen Moore now talking tariffs?    This is not an administration looking to further trade, in our opinion, but one only to protect and coddle its political base.

Trump’s triggers his base with words such as “free trade,” among others,  and blames much of their problems on the “bad trade deals” of previous administrations.   It works for him.  Why fix it?

But those who, like me, thought Trump’s bark would be worse than his bite on trade are having second thoughts about where all of this might lead.  – Dani Rodrik

President Xi Won’t Back Down

Moreover,  how in the world can President Xi, after consolidating power for life as the country’s ultimate strongman now back down and look weak to the Chinese people?   China has secured the high ground of multilateralism.  Even if it’s bullshit or not.   Furthermore,  the U.S. appears to be growing exponentially more isolated.

Nonlinear Dynamics

As we posted on Friday,  we are now in a nonlinear trajectory.  Things can unravel fast, or be put right quickly.   Maybe the Senate?   Nobody knows where this will end up.

We have all learned over the past 18 months that the president is capable of doing a 180,even in mid-sentence, and convince himself he held the position all along.  That unpredictability makes it a risky trade.

Markets In The Land Of Pharaoh


It does feel the markets are in Egypt, however.  The land of de Nile. (http://renewablerevolution.createaforum.com/gallery/renewablerevolution/3-250817121424.gif)

The post-war international order is more at risk of unraveling – and we are not saying its demise is imminent – than is currently priced.(http://renewablerevolution.createaforum.com/gallery/renewablerevolution/3-100718163624-1442258.jpeg)

Stay tuned.

*  https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-07-11/trumps-bite-may-be-worse-his-bark-stockman-slams-absurd-dangerous-stupid-policies

Agelbert NOTE: Stockman interview video at article link.
Title: Re: China
Post by: AGelbert on July 12, 2018, 11:51:34 am
CleanTechnica
Support CleanTechnica’s work via donations on Patreon or PayPal!

Or just go buy a cool t-shirt, cup, baby outfit, bag, or hoodie. (https://cleantechnica.com/shop/#!/)

5 Ways China’s Now A Global Climate Leader

July 11th, 2018 by Guest Contributor

Originally published on Climate Reality Project.

The world’s biggest emitter decided to take some serious climate action – and in the process renewed our hope that we will beat the climate crisis.

(https://cleantechnica.com/files/2018/07/Screenshot-2018-7-6-After-the-Airpocalypse-%E2%80%93-5-Ways-China-is-Becoming-a-Global-Climate-Leader-e1530880261199.png)

Ten years ago, the idea that China – the planet’s single biggest carbon polluter – would be a global leader on climate in 2018 would have sounded, well, a stretch.

But with terrifying levels of air pollution threatening to spark social unrests in earlier years and the US stepping back from the global stage under President Trump, that’s exactly what’s happened.

The story begins with a massive public health crisis, but how China responded – and five steps in particular – lays out a practical path to a low-carbon future for countries around the world.

Airpocalypse Now ☠️

How did the world’s biggest polluter become the world’s leader on climate?

It all goes back to the “Airpocalypse.”

Not too long ago, many in some of the Chinese cities were going about their business engulfed in a cloud of pollution. The gray haze could be so dense, that buildings and trees would quite literally disappear in front of your eyes. And stepping outside, even for just a minute, required wearing a facial mask to avoid directly breathing the toxic air.

How to Keep Climate Action on Track After the Paris Agreement

The source of much of that pollution wasn’t hard to find either: coal-fired power plants and vehicles on the road. Since the early 2000s, China’s economy had been growing rapidly, powered largely by coal.

The unchecked use of coal on such a huge scale didn’t take long to generate real problems. In 2005, China surpassed the United States to become the world’s biggest CO2 emitter (a title that the country has held since the 20th century). And in 2008, 16 of the 20 most polluted cities in the entire world were in China, according to the World Bank.

Enough Is Enough

In 2013, the Chinese government finally decided that enough was enough, introducing a national action plan to curb air pollution, including a set of coal consumption limits for key regions including Beijing and the Pearl River Delta.

In 2016, China released its national plan for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and committed to lowering the country’s carbon intensity of GDP by 60–65 percent (below 2005 levels) by 2030 in its Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) to Paris Agreement. As the world’s second-largest economy – and home to nearly 1.4 billion people – that’s a big deal to the world.

Growing Pains and Growing Progress

It hasn’t all been smooth sailing. Emissions are still rising as the country continues to grow. And although China has halt many coal projects over the past years, environmentalists have called it out for investing coal energy in other countries such as Turkey and Pakistan to satisfy its immense need for energy.

On the other hand, China has made real progress. Between 2013 and 2017, Chinese cities cut the amount of fine pollution particulates(PM2.5) in the air by an average of 32 percent. And the capital Beijing has seen a lot more sunny days as PM 2.5 concentration dropped 54 percent in the fourth quarter of 2017, in comparison to the same period of 2016.

On a global level, there’s also good news. China has been instrumental in keeping the Paris Agreement process going, continuing to curb emissions and expand renewables even as the US (another huge polluter) has dramatically backed down at the federal level.

So how’s China done it? There’ve been many steps, but five have been especially key.

1. Bye-Bye, Coal

China has been slowly (but surely) moving away from coal energy. Last year, the government announced plans to cancel 103 new plants and closed the very last coal plant located in the capital, Beijing.

From 2014 to 2015, coal consumption reduced after a decade of steady increase.

2. Putting a Price on Carbon


One of China’s most impressive moves was to launch the world’s largest national carbon trading market in 2017. The goal is to encourage companies to become greener by allowing them sell or buy excessive carbon emissions. The first phase of the project only covers the power generation sector, but the initiative is expected to expand across many other areas of the economy.

3. Clean Bus Rides

China is showing the world how to move many people around quickly and cleanly.   Around 17 percent of the country’s municipal buses are electric, and the city Shenzhen holds the record for the globe’s largest electric bus fleet, with all of its 16,359 buses had gone electric last year. The achievement was only possible due to government subsidies. But in the long run, operation and maintenance costs of electric buses are significantly lower than those fueled by diesel.

4. Making the Investment in Renewables

Moving away from fossil fuels and toward renewable energy is not just an effective way to clean up the planet. It’s also a good investment.

In 2017, China invested a staggering US$ 126.6 billion in renewable energy – 45 percent of the total worldwide investment. The country has been using a whole lot of green technology internally  – nearly doubled its solar generation from 2016 to 2017. But it also has its eyes on a much larger international market.

5. New Forests

China is so keen on green that it’s deploying soldiers to plant trees across the country. The goal is to replant many of the forests that were cut down for industrialization and farmland, all with an eye to removing carbon from the atmosphere on a massive scale and doing it naturally.

Sowing seeds is actually one of the country’s Paris Agreement goals – China wants to increase forest stock volume by 4.5 billion cubic meters by 2030, from its 2005 level. China is also planting a different kind of forest on its buildings to help sequester carbon.


The Takeaway


The catalyst was the sight of millions choking on industrial and power sector pollution, but the result has been one of the most influential for emissions reduction and energy transformation the world’s ever seen.

Five steps in the process have been critical:

Cutting coal

Putting a price on carbon

Cleaning up public transit

Investing in renewables

Conserve and rebuild the forest


The good news is that it doesn’t take a public health crisis for countries to embrace these and other practical solutions. The world’s second-largest economy has already shown they work, and now it’s time for other nations to follow its lead.

Want to stay updated on climate action across the globe? Join our email activist list. We’ll deliver the latest on climate science and innovative ways you can get involved in the climate movement right to your inbox.

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/07/11/5-ways-chinas-now-a-global-climate-leader/