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Topic Summary

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 15, 2017, 05:31:15 pm »

XYT — Simplifying EVs   

August 13th, 2017 by The Beam

SNIPPET:

The global race to cater to the growing electric car market is intensifying every day. All of the major car manufacturers are now pushing in this direction, and Tesla is constantly making headlines for its relentless advancement and ambitions to popularise electric vehicles. And amongst all of this largesse, there are smaller, more niche manufacturers breaking through and trying to find their own space in the industry.

We recently reported on the new Sion prototype, the first car to make use of external solar panels to give the vehicle extra charging capability for increased range, and now we’re introducing the unique electric vehicles from French manufacturer XYT.

It’s first car is made of just 580 pieces.


Aside from simplicity, what separates these cars from other cars is their modular and customisable design. Instead of the one-size-fits-all type of offering delivered by other manufacturers, the XYT gives the option of customizing and changing the vehicle based on your needs and desires.

Full article with a video:

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/08/13/xyt-simplifying-evs/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 15, 2017, 04:28:13 pm »

Every Major Crash of Formula E Season 3

August 15th, 2017 by The Beam


Article with the above video:
https://cleantechnica.com/2017/08/15/every-major-crash-formula-e-season-3/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 14, 2017, 08:16:02 pm »

Chanje V8070 — Another Level Of Electrification

August 14th, 2017 by Cynthia Shahan

SNIPPET:

Startup electric truck maker Chanje Energy has launched an electric Class 5 van, intent to replace last century’s fossil fuels with a zero-emissions Class 5 last-mile delivery option. This is the latest of several recent additions to the electric truck and van market.


Chanje V8070 is truly a vehicle without compromise  . Separating from the smelly particulate crowd, Chanje is offering the first premium-quality, extended-length, medium-duty electric vehicle in the US.

Delivery vehicles are major polluters — worse than regular cars. Chanje Energy intends to change that and aims to dominate the Class 5 last-mile delivery segment with its extended-length, medium-duty panel van, the Chanje V8070.

Fewer moving parts and no need for oil changes = 70% less maintenance costs, according to the company. Fuel costs? No, not so much — approximately 70% less as well. The approach Chanje took was to create a platform that “allows us to offer maximum payload, maximum cargo capacity, the most efficient powertrain.”

Full article: 

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/08/14/chanje-v8070-another-level-electrification/

Sweet!



And just imagine ten years down the road when those babies hit the used EV truck/van market and people turn them into RVs with solar panels on top! 

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 14, 2017, 07:22:07 pm »

Chanje V8070 — Another Level Of Electrification

August 14th, 2017 by Cynthia Shahan

SNIPPET:

Startup electric truck maker Chanje Energy has launched an electric Class 5 van, intent to replace last century’s fossil fuels with a zero-emissions Class 5 last-mile delivery option. This is the latest of several recent additions to the electric truck and van market.


Chanje V8070 is truly a vehicle without compromise  . Separating from the smelly particulate crowd, Chanje is offering the first premium-quality, extended-length, medium-duty electric vehicle in the US.

Delivery vehicles are major polluters — worse than regular cars. Chanje Energy intends to change that and aims to dominate the Class 5 last-mile delivery segment with its extended-length, medium-duty panel van, the Chanje V8070.

Fewer moving parts and no need for oil changes = 70% less maintenance costs, according to the company. Fuel costs? No, not so much — approximately 70% less as well. The approach Chanje took was to create a platform that “allows us to offer maximum payload, maximum cargo capacity, the most efficient powertrain.”

The Chanje V8070 has dual-hub rear motors.

Full article: 

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/08/14/chanje-v8070-another-level-electrification/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 12, 2017, 03:45:25 pm »

Parked Electric Cars Earn Cash While Feeding the Power Grid

August 11, 2017



Full article by Lorraine Chow:


https://www.ecowatch.com/evs-power-grid-2471744121.html
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 11, 2017, 02:59:38 pm »

Tesla Electric Semi Truck to test Self-Driving, capable of 'Platooning': report
Aug 10, 2017  John Voelcker 104 Comments

With Tesla, there's always something new coming up to keep owners, buyers, and fans excited.

The company's main task over the next year is to get its lower-priced Model 3 electric car into volume assembly at high quality, a process CEO Elon Musk has called "production hell."

But there's more to come, one of the new products being Tesla's promised all-electric semi tractor, apparently for long-haul freight.

Musk released a teaser image of the Tesla semi at a TED Talk in May

Now some details may have leaked out, in the form of an e-mail conversation between Tesla and the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles seen by the Reuters news service.

In those documents, Tesla sought state approval to test a prototype of its electric semi in Nevada that will contain self-driving software.

California DMV officials told Reuters they were to meet Tesla yesterday to discuss the company's "efforts with autonomous trucks" as well.

According to Reuters, the Tesla semi is likely to offer the capability of "platooning."

That's the term for automated vehicles traveling very close together at speed, which significantly cuts aerodynamic drag.

Vehicles that platoon must continually communicate with each other and the infrastructure around them, but the distances between them are far too short to allow a human driver to react in time to emergencies.

READ THIS: Tesla trucks: semi to be shown in Sept, pickup in 18-24 months

Several companies are working on autonomous driving technology specifically for long-haul trucks, in Silicon Valley and elsewhere.

Long-haul trucks do not face cross traffic when they travel on limited-access highways, and they largely operate at steady speeds.

Those are seen as more favorable conditions for self-driving vehicles than the far more diverse circumstances faced by passenger vehicles in a wide range of uses.

Continental gets Nevada approval to test autonomous cars

Daimler Trucks testing the first series-production autonomous truck on public roads

CHECK THIS OUT: Daimler to build large electric semi truck

Platooning, meanwhile, is seen as a way to reduce fuel consumption significantly among trucks with internal combustion engines (or energy use in the all-electric Tesla semi).

Robot Semi Trucks platooning
Daimler, Volvo, and other European heavy-truck makers have put years of effort into the technology, including numerous demonstrations on limited stretches of highway.

Platooning is viewed as a precursor to fully autonomous long-haul trucks, which are still widely assumed to be 10 years or more in the future.

He has driven the semi, he said, calling the big rig capable of sporty and spirited driving characteristics.

"This will be a very spry truck," Musk said. "You can drive this around like a sports car."

http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1112028_tesla-semi-truck-to-test-self-driving-capable-of-platooning-report

Agelbert NOTE: The widely assumed 10 year transition period for autonomus EV Semi Trucks is incorrect. They will be dominating in less than five years, simply because the sensor package is NOW cheap AND MORE reliable than a human driver.

The 1% want this profit over people automation. When they want something, it happens. 

In this case ,securing the truck contents will become better paid than driving the truck.

Unfortunately for hopeful drivers planning on being semi truck riding security guards, I do not doubt that the 1% will try to make we-the-people pay for truck contents security with added taxation for added police highway monitoring, rather than doing the responsible thing and hiring a security guard to ride with the truck and ensure safe delivery of the goods, along with the required paperwork.  >:(

At any rate, when you see lots of Semi Trucks Platooning, EV Semi Platooning will be right there to replace every diesel semi truck on the roads.

The upside of this for the biosophere and people of good will is that the lung clogging, respiratory disease causing particulate matter and green house gas pollution on our roads will be much reduced and the big oil refineries will have to put their diesel fuel CRAP where the sun doesn't shine.  ;D
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 08, 2017, 09:09:51 pm »

Auto Giants — Behind The Scenes, EV Movement Is Both Slower & Faster Than You Think (CleanTechnica Exclusive)

August 8th, 2017 by Zachary Shahan

SNIPPET:

An alternative title to the above was: “Slow & Steady Is A Recipe For Disruption.” But the story is a little more complicated than that.

Naturally, as the director of CleanTechnica, I get to talk to a lot of EV leaders at conferences around the world. We also get millions of views a month and a lot of feedback on and off the record*.

Some of that feedback is particularly useful for completing the EV transition puzzle in my mind. A couple of examples are two discussions I had earlier this year with some auto industry movers & shakers.

These discussions have been tingling inside my head because of the context they seem to add. The information I’ve gleaned has been aching for a write-up but delayed by so many other stores. However, recent quotes from Magna CEO Don Walker pushed me over the edge and finally got me to write this piece up.



https://cleantechnica.com/2017/08/08/auto-giants-behind-scenes-movement-slower-faster-think/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 07, 2017, 01:13:40 pm »

10 Electric Planes that Already Exist and Change the Future of Air Travel

Automotive Territory: Trending News & Car Reviews

Published on Aug 2, 2017

Electrically powered vehicles are conquering our planet and it is a fact.    Many cities like Singapore and Hamburg have vouched to replace their public transport fleets with emission-free vehicles by 2030 and many auto manufacturers have already established roadmaps and schedules for going all in electric. Boats and submarines are getting equipped with e-motors and even far reached world like Mars is being explored by Curiosity Rover thanks to an electric powertrain. But is the sky the limit for electric motors?

Apparently not , because up until today there is quite a number of already operational all-electric flying vessels that traverse the skies braking the stereotype that efficient and clean air travel is impossible on Earth. Today, we would like to share with you some knowledge about the first electric planes, so that when in 50 years all of the aircraft in the sky are electric, you will know how it all started. Enjoy your flight.



Electric aircraft that were featured here:

Solar Impulse 2: www.iata.org/pressroom/media-kit/Pages/solar-impulse.aspx

E-Fan 2.0 and Airbus E-Fan X: company.airbus.com/responsibility/airbus-e-fan-the-future-of-electric-aircraft.html

Facebook Aquila: facebook.com/notes/mark-zuckerberg/the-technology-behind-aquila/10153916136506634/

E-Fusion from Hungary’s Magnus Aircraft: magnusaircraft.com/efusion2

Siemens Extra 330LE: siemens.com/press/en/pressrelease/2017/corporate/pr2017040256coen.htm

e-Genius - the Institute of Aircraft Design at the University of Stuttgart: ifb.uni-stuttgart.de/egenius

Pipistrel Alpha Electro
: pipistrel.si/plane/alpha-electro/overview

Sun Flyer from Aero Electric Aircraft Corporation: sunflyer.com/

Lilium Jet: www.lilium.com/mission/

FlyNano
: www.flynano.com/faq.htm

Nasa The X-57: nasa.gov/image-feature/nasas-x-57-electric-research-plane/

Alice - Eviation Aircraft Company: eviation.co/alice/


Category
Autos & Vehicles
License
Standard YouTube License

Agelbert NOTE: The above is evidence that some humans have the brains to understand the following and actually DO something to stop the status quo suicidal stupidity of a fossil fuel based economy:

 
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 05, 2017, 12:50:54 pm »

BYD Electric Bus

BYD Lands Contract For 60 Electric Buses With Los Angeles County Metro

August 4th, 2017 by Steve Hanley

SNIPPET:


This story about BYD electric buses was first published on Gas2.

The City of Los Angeles is serious about its commitment to combating climate change. It is adding hundreds of electric cars to its municipal fleet and making plans that will allow low-income residents to dump their older cars with high emissions for cleaner cars.

It is promoting many miles of bike paths. And the Los Angeles county public transportation system, known as the Metro, has just inked a deal with BYD to buy 60 electric buses for its fleet.

BYD-electric bus cutaway

BYD has its American headquarters in Los Angeles and operates a factory in nearby Lancaster, California.

The new contract will add 59 workers to the 600 strong BYD payroll. Most of the new hires will be residents of Los Angeles county, according to the terms of the deal. In all, the Metro will pay $138 million for the 60 BYD buses plus 35 60-foot-long electric buses from New Flyer of America Inc, which is located in Crookston, Minnesota.

60-foot-long electric buses from New Flyer of America Inc,

full article:

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/08/04/byd-lands-contract-60-electric-buses-los-angeles-county-metro/

Agelbert NOTE:
Those EV buses, when they get into the used vehicle market, will make an EXCELLENT Renewable Energy powered dwelling (with a few solar panels nearby, of course.  ;D).


See More cool graphics info on the New Flyer EV bus below:

New Flyer EV Bus while charging




Charge collecting mechanism deployed on New flyer Electric Bus

Below please enjoy a present use for used buses that RE may like. I certainly do!  I think that used electric buses, with some solar panels nearby, would be the ultimate in sustainable, cosy but roomy, iving.  ;D



Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 05, 2017, 12:39:27 pm »

BYD Electric Bus

BYD Lands Contract For 60 Electric Buses With Los Angeles County Metro

August 4th, 2017 by Steve Hanley

SNIPPET:


This story about BYD electric buses was first published on Gas2.

The City of Los Angeles is serious about its commitment to combating climate change. It is adding hundreds of electric cars to its municipal fleet and making plans that will allow low-income residents to dump their older cars with high emissions for cleaner cars.

It is promoting many miles of bike paths. And the Los Angeles county public transportation system, known as the Metro, has just inked a deal with BYD to buy 60 electric buses for its fleet.

BYD-electric bus cutaway

BYD has its American headquarters in Los Angeles and operates a factory in nearby Lancaster, California.

The new contract will add 59 workers to the 600 strong BYD payroll. Most of the new hires will be residents of Los Angeles county, according to the terms of the deal. In all, the Metro will pay $138 million for the 60 BYD buses plus 35 60-foot-long electric buses from New Flyer of America Inc, which is located in Crookston, Minnesota.

60-foot-long electric buses from New Flyer of America Inc,

full article:

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/08/04/byd-lands-contract-60-electric-buses-los-angeles-county-metro/

Agelbert NOTE:
Those EV buses, when they get into the used vehicle market, will make an EXCELLENT Renewable Energy powered dwelling (with a few solar panels nearby, of course.  ;D).


See More cool graphics info on the New Flyer EV bus below:

New Flyer EV Bus while charging




Charge collecting mechanism deployed on New flyer Electric Bus

Below please enjoy a present use for used buses that RE may like. I certainly do!  I think that used electric buses, with some solar panels nearby, would be the ultimate in sustainable, cosy but roomy, iving.  ;D




Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 03, 2017, 01:34:36 pm »

New propaganda video on electric-car tax credits: time to debunk!

SNIPPET:

Quote
In 2016, the federal electric-vehicle tax-credit program cost the government less than $1.2 billion.

(That assumes every single electric car sold in the U.S. received for the full $7,500 sum, which is not the case).



In contrast, nine tax provisions that help subsidize oil and gas industry cost the federal government $3.8 billion combined every year.   


Consider this latest round of fossil-fuel propaganda debunked—or at least put in far more accurate context.

   

http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1111880_new-propaganda-video-on-electric-car-tax-credits-time-to-debunk
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 02, 2017, 02:57:20 pm »


Workhorse CEO Steve Burns Talks About The W-15 Plug In Hybrid Pickup Truck

June 21st, 2017 by Steve Hanley
 
With all the hype and hysteria about Tesla in the news lately, it’s easy to lose sight of some of the other companies that are making progress building more sustainable vehicles that will help lower carbon emissions from the transportation sector. Cars are important, but trucks spew out more carbon emissions each year. Workhorse, based in Ohio with a factory in Indiana, is elbowing its way to the front in a crowded field of competitors.


Workhorse W-15 plug in hybrid pickup truck

In a recent conversation with Charged EVs, Workhorse CEO Steve Burns shared some of the reasons why his company’s W-15 plug in hybrid pickup truck is getting so much attention from fleet owners. Just as the Tesla Model 3 has a long list of reservation holders, Workhorse also has received hundreds of pre-orders for the W-15 from Duke Energy, Southern California Public Power Authority, and Ryder Systems. In addition, municipalities like Columbus, Ohio and Orlando, Florida, have orders pending for plug in hybrid pickup.

Workhorse W-15 Built For Fleets

What makes a plug in hybrid pickup truck so appealing to fleets? Two factors, says Burns. First is total cost of ownership. “Green is good. Everybody wants to be green. It’s a nice by-product. But we realized that if electric is going to take off, it has to be less expensive than gas. It really comes down to that, at least in the fleet world. A meat-and-potatoes fleet guy says, ‘What is the most economical way I can operate my fleet?’ We come in and tell him we are less expensive than a gas vehicle.”

The second big factor is reliability. Fleet operators want to know the trucks are dependable and will last a long time. Workhorse has developed a close working relationship with UPS and that relationship is growing. “UPS is not a bakery that uses trucks. They are a truck company,” Burns says. “So, they are the hardest to satisfy. There’s no Consumer Reports .. in this space. So, if a fleet wants to know if something works, they look to the leaders.

“UPS is the largest commercial truck fleet in the United States. So, it took many, many years, and a lot of miles, to build something rugged enough for them, and at a price point they can justify. A fleet has to believe the vehicle is going to last. They have to believe it’s going to last for 20 years. UPS keeps their trucks for 20 years.”


Why A Range Extender Engine?

The W-15 will have a plug in hybrid powertrain using an internal combustion range extender engine sourced from BMW. Tesla has already announced it plans to bring an all electric pickup to market. Why does Burns feel the he needs the gas engine, too? “We really don’t think an all electric pickup truck will work, because of what people put pickup trucks through. Occasionally they have to do something very hard. Tow a lot, haul a lot, climb the side of a mountain, go far.

“Duke Energy, if there’s a hurricane in Charlotte, all the Duke trucks from all the neighboring states pack up and head for Charlotte. Although they normally go 50 miles a day, once in a while they’ve got to go 400. Once in a while, they put three big transformers in the back. We built this so that it covers our average day, and then we’ve got a little insurance policy up there. [Even] if it’s a weird day, you’re always going to complete your rounds.”


“We found that out with UPS. If you tell a major fleet that this vehicle is really good but doesn’t do all things, you’ve got to be careful where you put it, they don’t want to hear that. They just want it to be ubiquitous. We just say this can do anything a gas pickup can do. 360 days a year, you’re going to get 75 miles per gallon because you’re running it all electric, and the other 5 days, you’ll burn a little gasoline, but the show will always go on.”

The W-15 Is Ready To Work   


The W-15 is job site ready. It comes with a built in light bar with yellow flashing hazard lights, a sprayed-in bed liner and a 7.2 kW power export module. A central touchscreen controls most functions and is designed so it can be operated while wearing work gloves. The company has a proprietary fleet management system called Metron that keeps fleet managers constantly updated on each vehicles location and condition at all times. Workhorse can update software wirelessly over the air.

Safety is a high priority for the W-15. In addition to a full complement of air bags, it is equipped with emergency braking and collision warning systems, lane keeping assistance, and adaptive cruise control. Workhorse expects the W-15 to achieve the highest ever safety ratings for a pickup truck.

Private Sales Possible

Burns keeps getting asked if the W-15 will be available to private customers and he has left the door open on that possibility — at least a little. ? “Well, I would’ve said no to that a little while ago, but a couple of things are happening. It’s really good looking. We built it to be modern and professional looking. We have some aerodynamics to it because we’re worried about energy. Some of our customers wanted a lower hood so they could see pedestrians easier. All that combined into a very unique looking pickup truck, good looking enough that every consumer that sees it says they want one.”

Source: Charged EVs

Tags: pickup truck safety rating, pug in hybrid, range extender engine, Steve Burns, Wrokhorse W-15 plug in hybrid pickup truck

About the Author

Steve Hanley I have been a car nut since the days when Rob Walker and Henry N. Manney, III graced the pages of Road & Track. Today, I use my trusty Miata for TSD rallies and occasional track days at Lime Rock and Watkins Glen. If it moves on wheels, I'm interested in it. Please follow me on Google + and Twitter.


http://gas2.org/2017/06/21/workhorse-ceo-w-15-plug-in-hybrid-pickup-truck/

Cool truck. Hope they reach the consumer market. 
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 01, 2017, 09:22:23 pm »


Workhorse CEO Steve Burns Talks About The W-15 Plug In Hybrid Pickup Truck

June 21st, 2017 by Steve Hanley
 
With all the hype and hysteria about Tesla in the news lately, it’s easy to lose sight of some of the other companies that are making progress building more sustainable vehicles that will help lower carbon emissions from the transportation sector. Cars are important, but trucks spew out more carbon emissions each year. Workhorse, based in Ohio with a factory in Indiana, is elbowing its way to the front in a crowded field of competitors.


Workhorse W-15 plug in hybrid pickup truck

In a recent conversation with Charged EVs, Workhorse CEO Steve Burns shared some of the reasons why his company’s W-15 plug in hybrid pickup truck is getting so much attention from fleet owners. Just as the Tesla Model 3 has a long list of reservation holders, Workhorse also has received hundreds of pre-orders for the W-15 from Duke Energy, Southern California Public Power Authority, and Ryder Systems. In addition, municipalities like Columbus, Ohio and Orlando, Florida, have orders pending for plug in hybrid pickup.

Workhorse W-15 Built For Fleets

What makes a plug in hybrid pickup truck so appealing to fleets? Two factors, says Burns. First is total cost of ownership. “Green is good. Everybody wants to be green. It’s a nice by-product. But we realized that if electric is going to take off, it has to be less expensive than gas. It really comes down to that, at least in the fleet world. A meat-and-potatoes fleet guy says, ‘What is the most economical way I can operate my fleet?’ We come in and tell him we are less expensive than a gas vehicle.”

The second big factor is reliability. Fleet operators want to know the trucks are dependable and will last a long time. Workhorse has developed a close working relationship with UPS and that relationship is growing. “UPS is not a bakery that uses trucks. They are a truck company,” Burns says. “So, they are the hardest to satisfy. There’s no Consumer Reports .. in this space. So, if a fleet wants to know if something works, they look to the leaders.

“UPS is the largest commercial truck fleet in the United States. So, it took many, many years, and a lot of miles, to build something rugged enough for them, and at a price point they can justify. A fleet has to believe the vehicle is going to last. They have to believe it’s going to last for 20 years. UPS keeps their trucks for 20 years.”


Why A Range Extender Engine?

The W-15 will have a plug in hybrid powertrain using an internal combustion range extender engine sourced from BMW. Tesla has already announced it plans to bring an all electric pickup to market. Why does Burns feel the he needs the gas engine, too? “We really don’t think an all electric pickup truck will work, because of what people put pickup trucks through. Occasionally they have to do something very hard. Tow a lot, haul a lot, climb the side of a mountain, go far.

“Duke Energy, if there’s a hurricane in Charlotte, all the Duke trucks from all the neighboring states pack up and head for Charlotte. Although they normally go 50 miles a day, once in a while they’ve got to go 400. Once in a while, they put three big transformers in the back. We built this so that it covers our average day, and then we’ve got a little insurance policy up there. [Even] if it’s a weird day, you’re always going to complete your rounds.”


“We found that out with UPS. If you tell a major fleet that this vehicle is really good but doesn’t do all things, you’ve got to be careful where you put it, they don’t want to hear that. They just want it to be ubiquitous. We just say this can do anything a gas pickup can do. 360 days a year, you’re going to get 75 miles per gallon because you’re running it all electric, and the other 5 days, you’ll burn a little gasoline, but the show will always go on.”

The W-15 Is Ready To Work   


The W-15 is job site ready. It comes with a built in light bar with yellow flashing hazard lights, a sprayed-in bed liner and a 7.2 kW power export module. A central touchscreen controls most functions and is designed so it can be operated while wearing work gloves. The company has a proprietary fleet management system called Metron that keeps fleet managers constantly updated on each vehicles location and condition at all times. Workhorse can update software wirelessly over the air.

Safety is a high priority for the W-15. In addition to a full complement of air bags, it is equipped with emergency braking and collision warning systems, lane keeping assistance, and adaptive cruise control. Workhorse expects the W-15 to achieve the highest ever safety ratings for a pickup truck.

Private Sales Possible

Burns keeps getting asked if the W-15 will be available to private customers and he has left the door open on that possibility — at least a little. ? “Well, I would’ve said no to that a little while ago, but a couple of things are happening. It’s really good looking. We built it to be modern and professional looking. We have some aerodynamics to it because we’re worried about energy. Some of our customers wanted a lower hood so they could see pedestrians easier. All that combined into a very unique looking pickup truck, good looking enough that every consumer that sees it says they want one.”

Source: Charged EVs

Tags: pickup truck safety rating, pug in hybrid, range extender engine, Steve Burns, Wrokhorse W-15 plug in hybrid pickup truck

About the Author

Steve Hanley I have been a car nut since the days when Rob Walker and Henry N. Manney, III graced the pages of Road & Track. Today, I use my trusty Miata for TSD rallies and occasional track days at Lime Rock and Watkins Glen. If it moves on wheels, I'm interested in it. Please follow me on Google + and Twitter.


http://gas2.org/2017/06/21/workhorse-ceo-w-15-plug-in-hybrid-pickup-truck/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 01, 2017, 08:09:59 pm »

Want To Cut Carbon Dioxide Emissions? Electric Trucks Critical

August 1st, 2017 by Steve Hanley

This story about electric trucks was first published on Gas2.

SNIPPET:

With the electric car revolution getting a big boost last week with the official introduction of the Tesla Model 3, it may seem as though the world is well on its way to pollution-free transportation. But outside the limelight that shines on the latest EV drag race and claims of cars with 1,000 horsepower or more, the real focus of clean transportation advocates is on electric trucks, the workhorses that carry freight and cargo.



The International Energy Agency believes keeping global temperature rises below 2° Celsius depends in large part upon the electrification of some 600 million vehicles worldwide — half of them trucks. “In Europe, less than 5% of vehicles are commercial vehicles or heavy duty trucks, but they contribute to almost 20% of greenhouse gas emissions,” says Ananth Srinivasan, mobility expert with research consultancy Frost & Sullivan.

Electric truck chassis from SEA Automotive in Australia
Agelbert NOTE: Trucks made by FAW in China are BIG Trucks, not pickup trucks.

In Melbourne, Australia,  SEA Automotive is busy adding electric powertrains to trucks manufactured in China by FAW. Tony Fairweather, CEO of SEA Automotive, says his firm realized a few years ago that electric commercial vehicles were becoming economically viable much faster than predicted. “The components are cheaper every time we go to buy. There’s not many industries where that happens.”

Agelbert NOTE: The above is a Workhorse W-15 PHEV pickup truck, not a pure electric pickup truck.  It is only available as part of a  fleet purchase. :( *


Quote
* The Workhorse W-15 is the first plug-in range extended electric pickup built from the ground up by an OEM. Lithium ion battery cells from Panasonic provide an 80 mile all‑electric range, while the onboard generator works to recharge while driving to get the job done.  The W-15 chassis sets a new technology standard for fleet vehicle tech.
 http://workhorse.com/pickup/


Electric cars may drive 10 miles one day and 100 miles the next. They may also be used for long-distance trips occasionally. But a truck usually follows a predictable daily route where the range needed is known in advance. That means most owners of electric trucks don’t need to worry about recharging their vehicles out on the road. That can be done at the end of the work day with charging equipment installed at the home location.

Read More:

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/08/01/want-cut-carbon-dioxide-emissions-electric-trucks-critical/


Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 01, 2017, 06:43:06 pm »

Simple Hand Made Electric Bike: DIY

by omars2 in electronics


Hi!

In this instructable, i will teach you how to make an electric bicycle at home.

Also, this electric bike was selected and presented in the North India Solar Summit (NISS) 2016 and it remained in the news papers and web articles for many days. I would also like to share its news articles with you.



http://www.instructables.com/id/Simple-Hand-Made-Electric-Bike-DIY/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 31, 2017, 06:05:02 pm »

Electric Vehicles Enter the Here and Now
Jul. 28, 2017

By Jason Mathers

The high level of confidence that automotive industry leaders have in the future of electric vehicles (EVs) has been on full display recently.

In just the past few weeks: 

Tesla's Model 3 started to roll off the assembly line.

Daimler announced a $740 million investment to produce EV batteries in China.

Cummins noted it would have a fully electric truck platform available by the end of 2019.

Lyft pledged to provide a billion rides a year powered by electricity by 2025.

Porsche set a 2023 target for having 50 percent of its production be electric vehicles.

Volvo Cars announced that "all the models it introduces starting in 2019 will be either hybrids or powered solely by batteries."



This spurt of corporate announcements has been paired with a bevy of statements of international leadership:

France declared it would be all electric by 2040.

India challenged itself to be gas free by 2030.

China took the global lead in terms of number of EVs on the road.


These developments are more than just excitement about an emerging solution. They are indicators that the market for EVs is developing faster than anticipated even just last year.

Consider the findings of a new report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance:

"[L]ithium-ion cell costs have already fallen by 73 percent since 2010." 

The report updated its future cost projections to reflect further steep cost reductions in the years ahead, with a price per kilowatt-hour in 2025 of $109 and in 2030 of $73.

Cost reductions on this order would result in EVs achieving cost parity with some classes of conventional vehicles by 2025—and across most vehicle segments by 2029, according to the report. EV sales are expected to really take off once they achieve cost parity with conventional vehicles, as the vehicles are significantly less expensive to fuel and maintain.

The acceleration in the EV market is great news for climate protection, too. A recent assessment found that zero-emission vehicles, such as EVs, need to comprise 40 percent of new vehicles sold by 2030 in order for the automotive sector to be on a path to achieve critical mid-century emissions targets. With the momentum in the EV market, we have a critical window to further boost this market by ensuring greater access of electric vehicles and a cleaner electric grid to power them.

Unfortunately, the U.S. has not demonstrated the same appetite for national leadership on EVs as other countries. Even worse, we are going in the wrong direction—with serious implications for our health, climate and economy.

Instead of leading, the Trump Administration is undermining critical clean air and climate protections including the landmark clean car standards for 2022 to 2025. The actions of individual automakers, however, tell a very different story from the "can't do it" mantra put forth by the administration.

In their commitments, investments and new product introductions, automotive manufacturers and their suppliers are clearly telling us that low emissions vehicles can play a much bigger role in the near future.

The fact is that automakers can meet the existing 2022 to 2025 federal greenhouse gas standards through deployment of current conventional technology alone. Now, in addition to the robust pathway automakers have through existing technologies, EV adoption rates in the U.S. will be 10 percent in 2025 if the Bloomberg New Energy Finance forecasts hold true. This is further proof that the existing standards are highly achievable. Rather than weaken the standard, the administration should be pursuing options to further scale EVs over the next decade.

Investing in clear car solutions is sound economic policy. These investments enhance the global competitiveness of the U.S. automotive sector.

This is why the UAW in a letter supporting the existing 2022 to 2025 clean car standards, noted:

"UAW members know firsthand that Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) and greenhouse gas (GHG) standards have spurred investments in new products that employ tens of thousands of our members."

Like other key aspects of the potential of the emerging EV marketplace, the role it can play as an employer has been in the news recently, too.

An AM General assembly plant in northern Indiana was acquired by electric vehicle manufacture SF Motors. The company announced that it will make a $30 million investment in the facility and keep on all the 430 employees.

Fittingly, most of the 430 jobs that were saved to manufacture an emerging, clean technology are represented by UAW Local 5—the oldest continuously operating UAW Local in the country.

https://www.ecowatch.com/electric-vehicles-future-2465790666.html
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 30, 2017, 03:01:12 pm »

California’s EV charging network gets $800 million spark from VW

SACRAMENTO — In a decision with lasting implications for the growth of electric vehicles, state regulators on Thursday approved Volkswagen’s plan to invest nearly $1 billion in California’s EV network as penalty for its diesel-emission cheating scandal.

The plan approved by the state Air Resources Board would inject $800 million over 10 years into California’s electric vehicle market, including new, universal charging stations, a model “Green City” in Sacramento and education about zero-emission vehicles.

The massive investment could reshape the state’s budding network of electric vehicle charging stations while supporting Gov. Jerry Brown’s goal to have 1.5 million zero-emission vehicles on California roads by 2025.

San Jose and San Francisco are two of six cities slated for expanded community charging stations. A Volkswagen subsidiary, Electrify America, also will target low-income communities for at least 35 percent of the projects.

Chairwoman Mary Nichols said it was a long process to refine the plan, but added “we’ve gained a lot of confidence that it’s going to be a success.”

But critics said Volkswagen’s vast plan could chill competition and innovation in an emerging industry, and it snubs hydrogen fueling stations.

Volkswagen settled with federal and state regulators over a scheme to evade pollution standards in its 2- and 3-liter diesel-powered vehicles. The German automaker rigged software in nearly 600,000 diesel cars and trucks to pass federal emission tests, while the vehicles spouted unacceptable pollution levels.

In California, Volkswagen agreed to spend $1.2 billion through two separate environmental programs: at least $381 million for cutting pollution and $800 million for the infrastructure trust fund.

Volkswagen has also agreed to spend $1.2 billion for EV support throughout the rest of the country.

Environmentalists, lawmakers, automakers and EV charging companies fought over early details of the state plan, forcing the German automaker to include more guarantees to spend money in poor communities more likely to be polluted.

Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg endorsed the deal, saying it would bring clean vehicle technology to underserved communities. “We will not waste this opportunity,” he said.

Maxwell Baumhefner, attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council, said the plan will help the state catch-up with demand for EV stations.

“The timing is right,” he said, noting that Electrify America has already begun building projects in other states. “It’s time to start breaking ground.”

Most EV charging companies sent letters of support for the plan, but ChargePoint, a leading electric vehicle charging network based in Campbell, urged the board to create more oversight. ChargePoint Vice President Anne Smart testified Thursday that the company was “still disappointed with the lack of details” and concerned the plan could chill other EV charging investments throughout the state.

The Electrify America investment plan will bring charging stations along highways and into overlooked neighborhoods, helping define the state’s electric vehicle corridors for years.

The projects will be split in four, $200 million increments built over 30-month periods. The Air Resources Board will oversee the project and gather regular input, including from automakers and charging companies.

The first phase calls for $120 million to build 400 charging stations with between 2,000 and 3,000 chargers. About $75 million will be used to develop a high-speed, highway charging network, mostly consisting of 150 kilowatt fast-chargers. The other $45 million will build community charging stations in six metro areas: San Jose, San Francisco, Sacramento, Fresno, Los Angeles and San Diego.

Another $44 million will build a “Green City” in Sacramento. It will provide access to zero-emission vehicles to low-income residents, through ride-sharing and other programs.

As part of the 10-year comprehensive plan, Electrify America will build a nationwide network of fast-charging stations with universal technology. Mark McNabb, CEO of Electrify America, said the company wants to have an impact beyond its 10-year plan.

“This is our legacy,” he told board members.

Several board members expressed concern over whether Volkswagen would live up to its promises. Board member Hector De La Torre said the ARB would “trust but verify” the company’s progress. But, he added, “it’s our obligation to get this thing going.”

http://www.siliconvalley.com/2017/07/27/ev-charging-network-gets-800-million-spark-from-vw/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 30, 2017, 02:44:27 pm »


Why did you sell your Tesla car?  ???
Christian Bull, Tesla owner since February 2014

July 29, 2017

I got my Model S in February of 2014. It was a fabulous car, which convinced both me and my wife that we will never purchase another car with an internal combustion engine. The car did have its problems (Three years of Tesla ownership by Christian Bull on A Tesla Consumption Log), but all in all I was super happy with it.

I was planning to replace it with a Jaguar I-pace which comes out next year. Not because I was unhappy with the Tesla, but because I’ve always wanted a Jaguar and I was never planning to keep the Model S for more than four years anyway.

This winter that plan changed a little, and I needed to replace the S sooner than I had intended to. The I-pace also looks like it’s going to be too small for my family, so I ended up replacing my Model S with a Model X in May of this year.  ;D

Because of a bit of luck with timing, the Model S was for all intents and purposes free. I spent maybe $850 on maintenance (services at 20,000 and 40,000 km), but I got a big discount on the first service for a couple of reasons), and when I traded the car in to Tesla in May 2017, I got 75% of the original purchase price back - that was just me being lucky with the USD to Norwegian Krone exchange rate. The depreciation was made up for in fuel savings.

Teslas are not perfect unicorns. They are complex machines, with bells and whistles (retracting door handles, falcon wing doors) that are mechanical and will eventually break, just like stuff breaks on regular cars. In total, however, I’m quite certain that over time maintenance costs will be significantly lower for a Tesla than a comparable ICE powered car.

https://www.quora.com/Why-did-you-sell-your-Tesla-car


Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 28, 2017, 06:38:25 pm »

Ten years ago News coverage and editorials frequently postulated Tesla’s coming demise. 


Remember The Tesla Death Watch? (Hahaha)

July 28th, 2017 by Zachary Shahan

Originally published on Planetsave.

SNIPPET:

Tesla was on a death watch notice nearly one decade ago. News coverage and editorials frequently postulated Tesla’s coming demise. It couldn’t produce cars. No one wanted its cars. Its cars broke down around every turn. Where would people charge? Where could the cars be fixed?


Full article packed with lots of CROW for people like Tyler Durden of ZeroHedge to eat.


https://cleantechnica.com/2017/07/28/tesla-death-watch-hahaha/


Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 28, 2017, 02:10:44 pm »


Mercedes, Porsche to join Audi, BMW, Jaguar, Renault in Formula E racing[/color][/b][/size][/i]

Jul 28, 2017

The changing of the guards in motor racing is underway: both Porsche and Mercedes-Benz have announced they will join the FIA Formula E electric-car racing series in 2019.

To make that possible, both German teams will end their tenures in respected motorsport; Porsche will end its World Endurance Championship LMP1 program, while Mercedes plans to pull out of DTM (German Touring Car Championship).

The news leaves Toyota as the only factory team left in the LMP1 class; both Audi and BMW appear to be reevaluating their own commitments to the DTM series as well.

DON'T MISS: 11 things you need to know about Formula E electric-car racing

The announcements reflect the growing promotional importance of Formula E to automakers and for their future electric cars.

Formula E will ultimately give electric-car makers the chance to put their own battery and other electric-drive technologies to the test in competitive racing.

In Porsche's announcement, it said its entrance into Formula E will bolster the company's program to build pure GT vehicles and fully-electric sports cars.
 
The company's first production electric model will be based on the Mission E concept car shown in 2015, a smaller four-door sedan likely to be priced below the Panamera sedan.

Porsche's aggressive pricing strategy could put the production Mission E up against fully-specced Tesla Model 3 sedans—but what Porsche learns from its factory Formula E team will likely influence all of its future electric cars.

Formula E will make a few notable changes in its future seasons, which are likely factors that helped sway Mercedes-Benz and Porsche to join the motorsport.

READ THIS: Why all electric-car owners should follow Formula E racing

The series will no longer require two cars per driver with the potential of a mid-race car change, as it doubles the capacity of the standard battery pack used by all teams.

Currently, Formula E teams must run four cars, but that requirement will fall to two cars in Season 5—a testament to improved battery technology since the series' launch in 2013.

Additionally, Formula E race cars will receive a design overhaul and incorporate the latest cutting-edge technology.

 New York City ePrix FIA Formula E electric-car race, Red Hook, Brooklyn, July 2017New York City ePrix FIA Formula E electric-car race, Red Hook, Brooklyn, July 2017
Porsche and Mercedes-Benz will join Audi, BMW, Jaguar, and French electric-car maker Renault among others in 2019 when season six of the motorsport gets underway.

The series' goal has long been to change the public's perception of electric cars, and the entry of two additional and very prestigious German marques will clearly help in that regard.

CHECK OUT: Racing strategy in Formula E varies from Formula One: why it's hard

With the entrance of Mercedes and Porsche, the total number of teams will climb to 12—a remarkable feat for the relatively new motorsport.

If the future is indeed electric , Formula E should provide a very public catalyst within motorsport to ensure racing always has a place.

_______________________________________

Follow GreenCarReports on Facebook and Twitter.

Cool Formula E race car pictures at link: 

http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1111793_mercedes-porsche-to-join-audi-bmw-jaguar-renault-in-formula-e-racing

Agelbert NOTE: The EV owner survey (free 30 page portion of a $500 report) that I downloaded and promised to report on has several informative graphs but no hard cost figures on EV ownership.  :( That is in the full report and I cannot afford to buy it.  ;D

That said, I did learn a few things that I will pass on to you:

A Volt is an Opel Ampera in Europe.

Most EV owners overwhelmingly wanted a fast charge option (that added about a thousand dollars to the price :P) even though over 90% of those EV owners DID NOT use fast charging in their routine daily lives.

Most EV owners love new technology. NOTE: There is a big split here between Tesla owners and all the rest. The Tesla owners are way too Jetson Tech freaky, which is sort of expected since they dished out so much money for an EV.

Most owners of EVs in the Leaf level of cost wanted economy and a tool to help them use less energy all around, not just in transportation.

Most owners of  EVs in the Leaf level of cost (and about 30% of Tesla model S owners too!) reported being inspired to lower their household energy consumption after buying their EV.

All EV owners reported lower operation and maintence costs than on their previous gas guzzler cars.

In actual use EV range anxiety is not a factor because EV owners bone up quickly on where the charging stations are, in case of need, and plan every move they make. This is a big difference from when they owned gas guzzlers, and some reading this might say, AHA! the EV "restricts freedom!". NOPE. What it does is make people do something they do not like to do: THINK about energy use and become more conscious of when and how it is used so as to NOT ABUSE it. The narcissistic greed balls among us will find this "restrictive", of course. But greed balls do not understand biosphere math. EV owners learn it quickly. After about a month, the EV owner is conscious of, and attuned to, energy use like never before.   They settle into an energy and cost saving routine that, except for longer trips which occur maybe two or three times a YEAR, does not require planning or restrict their movement. All the hand wringing from the peanut gallery gas guzzlers about "EV range anxiety" is, in practice, unjustified. Gas guzzler owners will say that EV owners are exhibiting endowment bias. The survey report admits there must be some bias because non-EV owners are not in the survey. That said, ALL the EV owners reported having owned gas guzzlers previously (in some cases they still have one). So the "bias" of EV owners, is really an objective conclusion reached after having driven gas guzzlers all their adult lives. That IMHO, is NOT a bias; it's sound critcal thinking. 

The overwhelming majority of EV owners is male, not female.  :( This is depressing to me, but I understand it. Females of our species, though assumed to be more "environmentally conscious and caring" than males, are actually naturally reticent to try new things. IOW, they are far more conservative than the average male. Women, in general, dislike risk. What, pray tell, is "risky" about owning an EV for a woman? Well, IMHO, the propaganda out there against EVs is NOT what is keeping women from being too keen to buy them or influencing them  to view EVs as "too risky".

What is "risky" about EVs for women is that they cannot "fill up the tank" at all those gas stations out there. ;D Women are more culturally acclimated than men. They LIKE to be part of the herd. Owning an EV is, at present, an act of defiance to herd mentality and a potential source of gossip for her female friends. So, more females  are in the "wait and see" category than males. This will totally flip when the DAMAGE to the environment of owning a gas guzzler becomes part of the herd knowledge. I am being a bit long winded about this issue because my wife simply will not hear of owning an EV. I told her they can no longer gouge us for mufflers, catalytic converters, emission sensor replacements, cooling system hoses, coolant, oil changes, transmission fluids, frequent brake jobs and other inspection fun and games. She counters that the mechanics will "think of something else" to gouge us with and EVs cost too much money up front. I tell there is an offer for a NEW 2017 Leaf  lease (for Vermont residents) that, including the $1,999 (includes first $199 monthly payment) down payment plus 35 $199 payments and residual - cost to buy - of $8,207 plus cost to own $300 fee comes to a TOTAL of $17,471.00 (manufacturer's rebate of $13,400 :o  ;D) plus taxes  (which are much lower because the vehicle is three years old at that point), not the high $31,565 MSRP. She says there must be a gimmick or they want to offload them because they are lemons and can't sell them.  ::)  I tell her about the low operation and maintenance and that, since she mostly uses the car for groceries (we drive less than 2,000 miles a YEAR, so the 12,000 mile per year lease "limitation" is irrelevant to us), we don't have a range anxiety issue. She says she doesn't want to have to run an extension cord from our manufactured home to the car after she does errands (we do not own the land - we rent it - we CANNOT build a garage and put a charging unit in it). 


I certainly don't agree with it, but now I sympathize more with Adam's decision to eat that fruit.  :(

If the following has some hidden cost I am not seeing, I don't know what it is.


Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 25, 2017, 06:06:18 pm »

Quote
How did Tesla win against the oil lobby?   

Matt Wasserman, We don't know what the internet is for, but it's caught on faster than any technology since fire.

Juyl 13, 2017

They haven’t won anything yet. Total production of all Teslas, ever, is less than the number of F-150 pickups Ford makes every few months. Tesla is the first new car company to get this far since Saturn, and the first truly new car company to do it since Hyundai, and they should be congratulated for that. But there is still a long way to go before they become more than a relatively low volume niche player.

A word about direct sales - Everyone who says the laws prohibiting direct sales are antiquated is right, but they are right for the wrong reasons. Those laws are antiquated, and no longer needed, because no volume car manufacturer would dream of selling direct. That way lies bankruptcy. It works when 90%+ of your cars are sold before you build them. It stops working when most of the cars you build come with significant inventory carrying costs.

And it presents all kinds of problems in terms of service and warranty repairs. Most Tesla owners are looking at 3 days, minimum, for twice yearly scheduled maintenance and even longer than that for warranty repairs. Is that going to work when Tesla has to scale to a million cars a year? Can they even maintain that already pretty terrible performance when they have half a million or a million cars on the road? Can the company afford the parts inventory required to improve warranty repair timeframes? They can build more service centers, and they will, but that increases capital expenditures for a company already investing a lot in Superchargers and plant upgrades. The cost of parts inventory increases as well. And in the long term it likely comes with no benefit to the consumer - keep prices low and you’ve invested a ton of money into something that doesn’t generate a return (that’s also known as a loss), charge fair prices and you may as well have a dealer network.

Tesla may be the first car company to figure out how to get direct sales to scale. But if they do they will be the first, let’s not forget that. And let’s also not forget that the company has to turn a profit at some point.

Will Tesla beat the oil lobby? Probably not. The Chevy Bolt is projected to outsell the Model S this year even if sales for the second half only match the first half and it hasn’t even gone national yet. Ford is going to jump into the pool sometime soon, and Volkswagen is moving from diesel to electric (at least in the US). All new cars will be electric at some point, probably in the next 20 - 25 years, but it won’t be because Tesla has become a dominant player.

Agelbert REPLY: The argument you present is flawed. To begin with, an EV is not a cash cow for maintenance costs, as all internal combustion engine powered cars are. THAT is the reason the dealer network is profitable. They MAKE THEIR MONEY on maintenence, NOT on selling cars.

Tesla is selling electric power plants on wheels, not the typical gas guzzler car.

EVs have very few moving parts, so the maintenace that would require a dealer is mostly absent. Tire maintenance does not require a dealer, which is the MAIN issue with an EV.

The battery pack eventual exchange will require Tesla to do it, but that is a once in a decade (or more) operation. You do not need a dealer network for that.

All that said, Tesla has a huge network of charging stations. I expect that people licensed to service Tesla cars (and other EVs) will set up shop near these charging stations, or Tesla may modify some of their charging stations to provide some maintenance.

The issue is not “beating big oil”. Big oil is a dead man walking, as anybody that knows anything about catastrophic climate change knows.

The issue is how long before Tesla can market an EV for $15,000 or less. Until they can do that, they cannot outsell the gas guzzlers.

Big Oil is the only reason, by the way, that certain Chinese EVs that DO sell for less than the equvalent of $15,000 (in China), are not marketed in the USA.

Big Oil is the reason that the $7,500 tax credit on EVs cannot be spread over several years, making it impossible for over 80% of the buying public to fully benefit from the tax credit (most people don’t pay anywhere near $7,500 in income tax in one year) AND FORCING those people to lease instead. Leasing ALSO jacks up the price on those least able to pay it.

All those hurdles to owning an EV were, and are, deliberatly imposed to keep the EVs in niche status, although Big Oil would prefer to destory EV sales altogether.

And the dealer network you are so sold on is a nest of crooks and liars that people are VERY tired of.

Big oil and the gas guzzler manufacturer and dealer network still hold sway in this country, but that will change, even if people like you think they have a “good” business model. They don’t.

Tesla does have a good business model. When serious competitors like Toyota finally figure that out, they will begin to emulate Tesla (for pure EVs) and probably produce better EVs at a lower price too! Tesla is a leader but soon they will have to lower their prices to remain competitive.

https://www.quora.com/How-did-Tesla-win-against-the-oil-lobby
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 25, 2017, 02:14:59 pm »

Electric Car Drivers: Desires, Demands & Who They Are

Latest update: 10 Jun 2017

A unique, in-depth report about EV driver needs, desires, user experiences, and demographics. Over 2,000 EV drivers in 28 countries told us what they want in future EVs & EV charging. We tell you what they said.

Read the free version of the report [PDF] — the first 30 pages of the report.  ;D

publisher:CleanTechnica
industry:Electric cars
price:$500

Agelbert NOTE: I just got the free version. After I have perused it, I'll give you a summary.  8)

Meanwhile, here's some hot news about the coming solid-state :o battery innovation for EVs:


Toyota spokesperson Kayo Doi tells Japanese daily news source Chunichi Shimbun the company will not comment on specific product plans but does intend to commercialize solid-state batteries by the early 2020s.

Toyota Electric Car Will Use Solid-State Batteries For Long Range & Quicker Charging

Published on July 25th, 2017 | by Steve Hanley

This story about electric car plans at Toyota was first published on Gas2.

Toyota is not giving up on the hydrogen fuel cell technology that powers the Mirai, but is busy working in the background on an all-electric car with solid-state batteries that offer long range and fast recharging. The plan is to introduce the car, which will be built on an all new chassis, to the Japanese market in … 2022. Yep, that’s 5 years away.

Solid State Batteries Are The Future

No one doubts that solid-state batteries are the future. Replacing the liquid electrolyte found in today’s lithium-ion batteries will eliminate the risk of fire and explosion associated with current battery technology. That danger, while low, remains a concern for many people considering the purchase of an electric car.

To limit such risks, electric cars today must use sophisticated cooling systems to stabilize the temperature inside battery packs. Such systems add cost, weight, and bulk to the cars. Solid-state batteries will not need such elaborate cooling systems, which will help bring down the cost of building an electric car. As an added bonus, they are capable of being recharged in much less time than a conventional lithium-ion battery.


Researchers such as John Goodenough have been trying to build a robust, inexpensive solid-state battery for decades. Toyota saying it will do so is one thing. Actually doing it is quite another. Israeli startup StoreDot says it has a solid-state battery with a range of 300 miles  that recharges in 5 minutes  :o .


EMotion EV debuting August 17, 2017

Henrik Fisker claims his new EMotion electric car will go more than 400 miles on a single charge and then recharge in just 9 minutes. That car is set to hit the road in 2019.



New Electric Car Division At Toyota

Full article:


https://cleantechnica.com/2017/07/25/toyota-electric-car-will-use-solid-state-batteries-long-range-quicker-charging/

At least one of us wants an eV pickup truck.

My brother-in-law got the new Leaf. I haven't gotten feedback yet on how he likes it. I am driving the Volt now full time,  and my only complaint is the short range on eV, but I drive in the hybrid "mountain mode" and it works out okay. I worry that it is too hard on the car to engage the gas engine as much as I do.


 


Thank you for this valuable and informative comment. This is the type of objective, real world information people need to read about. Please post on the Leaf EV experience of your brother-in-law when he has had it for a while. That is the car I would love to have.
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 25, 2017, 12:57:19 pm »

Electric Car Drivers: Desires, Demands & Who They Are

Latest update: 10 Jun 2017

A unique, in-depth report about EV driver needs, desires, user experiences, and demographics. Over 2,000 EV drivers in 28 countries told us what they want in future EVs & EV charging. We tell you what they said.

Read the free version of the report [PDF] — the first 30 pages of the report.  ;D

publisher:CleanTechnica
industry:Electric cars
price:$500

Agelbert NOTE: I just got the free version. After I have perused it, I'll give you a summary.  8)

Meanwhile, here's some hot news about the coming solid-state :o battery innovation for EVs:


Toyota spokesperson Kayo Doi tells Japanese daily news source Chunichi Shimbun the company will not comment on specific product plans but does intend to commercialize solid-state batteries by the early 2020s.

Toyota Electric Car Will Use Solid-State Batteries For Long Range & Quicker Charging

Published on July 25th, 2017 | by Steve Hanley

This story about electric car plans at Toyota was first published on Gas2.

Toyota is not giving up on the hydrogen fuel cell technology that powers the Mirai, but is busy working in the background on an all-electric car with solid-state batteries that offer long range and fast recharging. The plan is to introduce the car, which will be built on an all new chassis, to the Japanese market in … 2022. Yep, that’s 5 years away.

Solid State Batteries Are The Future

No one doubts that solid-state batteries are the future. Replacing the liquid electrolyte found in today’s lithium-ion batteries will eliminate the risk of fire and explosion associated with current battery technology. That danger, while low, remains a concern for many people considering the purchase of an electric car.

To limit such risks, electric cars today must use sophisticated cooling systems to stabilize the temperature inside battery packs. Such systems add cost, weight, and bulk to the cars. Solid-state batteries will not need such elaborate cooling systems, which will help bring down the cost of building an electric car. As an added bonus, they are capable of being recharged in much less time than a conventional lithium-ion battery.


Researchers such as John Goodenough have been trying to build a robust, inexpensive solid-state battery for decades. Toyota saying it will do so is one thing. Actually doing it is quite another. Israeli startup StoreDot says it has a solid-state battery with a range of 300 miles  that recharges in 5 minutes  :o .


EMotion EV debuting August 17, 2017

Henrik Fisker claims his new EMotion electric car will go more than 400 miles on a single charge and then recharge in just 9 minutes. That car is set to hit the road in 2019.



New Electric Car Division At Toyota

Full article:


https://cleantechnica.com/2017/07/25/toyota-electric-car-will-use-solid-state-batteries-long-range-quicker-charging/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 23, 2017, 12:59:06 pm »

Quote
Agelbert
Zach, can you recommend a maintenance cost comparison study of an EV versus a gas guzzler covering several years? The best info I could find says the cost for an EV is 3 to 4 cents a mile versus 5 or 6 cents a mile for a gas guzzler. I think that operation and maintenenace for and EV is more like about a tenth of gas guzzzler costs. Nobody wants to just come out and say that gasoline is GUARANTEED to go UP while electricity is GUARANTEED to go DOWN as the years go by.

Also, I wish the up front cost of the vehicle was NOT figured into the operation and maintenance in these cost estimates. The glaring difference in actual day to day costs is what is important after you buy or lease the vehicle.
 
For example a "used" 2016 Leaf with less than a 1,000 miles on it can be purchased (WITH the full factury guarantee!) for less than $17,000. THIS is the kind of vehicle that should be used for cost comparison of operation and maintenance. I'm sure that leaf can be operated and maintained for much less than half what it costs to do the same for a gas guzzler.

I welcome comments and suggestions on how to get the best, accurate and objective info.



Matt > agelbert • an hour ago
Taking into account what we paid for our solar panels, we're probably paying $0.022 per mile for our EV.

My 2004 Honda probably costs $0.083 per mile just for gas. I'm probably averaging about $0.04/mile for ICE maintenance: oil change, timing belt, oil pan, etc... No point including tires, wipers, 12v battery, etc, since both cars have those, and they are very cheap compared to their lifetime. Hopefully, I'll never have to find out how much it takes to replace the EV's drive battery.

Edit: So that leaves a 10 cent difference per mile, before taking into account the damage done by fossil fuels. If you think a carbon tax should be $100/metric ton, add $0.03 per mile for the Honda.

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/07/22/electric-car-faq-answers/
Agelbert NOTE: A ten cent a mile difference, when you figure 100,000 miles, is a BIG deal!

Quote
Matt > agelbert
Taking into account what we paid for our solar panels, we're probably paying $0.022 per mile for our EV.

My 2004 Honda probably costs $0.083 per mile just for gas. I'm probably averaging about $0.04/mile for ICE maintenance: oil change, timing belt, oil pan, etc... No point including tires, wipers, 12v battery, etc, since both cars have those, and they are very cheap compared to their lifetime. Hopefully, I'll never have to find out how much it takes to replace the EV's drive battery.

Edit: So that leaves a 10 cent difference per mile, before taking into account the damage done by fossil fuels. If you think a carbon tax should be $100/metric ton, add $0.03 per mile for the Honda.

Well, "probably"  plus "probably averaging about" minus a "probably" gives a probable figure excluding the definitely huge battery replacement factor.  0.022 / (0.083   0.04) , which is what I asked about is 17.8% which is a lot bigger than the "tenth" you must have just guessed at, and when the battery replacement is accounted for, and the cost of electricity used for charging, things would be VERY different.

You DEFINITELY have some fascinating cherry picking abilities, gaspadine. What part of "gasoline is going to cost MORE MONEY and Electricity is going to cost LESS, along with batteries costing LESS as the years go" by do you DELIBERATELY FAIL TO UNDERSTAND? 

Probably ALL OF THE ABOVE. And then there is that other "minor" cost that you flat REFUSE to acknowledge is real. It must be fun to live in such a world of cherry picked fantasy. 

The following video is from 2013, which may be considered the "good old days" now, since 2015, then 2016 were progressively hotter yet. And 2017 is. so far, HOTTER than  the hottest year!  Palloy and his "real world" f(FANTASY) ossil fuel pals were not listening then and they are not listening now.


The PRICE of Carbon


The fossil fuel industry is NOT PAYING IT; WE ARE! 

   

Here's an article Palloy will disagree with and ridicule as "garden variety" or "irrelevant" or disdain with some other pejorative bit of puffery.

The only part of the article he will agree with is that the Oil and Gas industry ACTUALLY gave solar power technology development a boost back in the 70s because PV supplied power to very remote locations the fossil fuelers tend be located at for new profit over planet piggery.  ;D

The FULL story of how we-the-people have supported these fossil fuel and nuclear welfare queens is there from the start until this day. The appearance of profitability ignores our tax money for research and continuous subsidy.

Palloy and his Fossil fueler pals have an amazing ability to ignore, not just externalized costs, but the giveaways from we-the-people! They have the brass balls to compute those subsidies as part of the ROI. That's a blatant accounting falsehood. Without subsides they are not profitable, period. But Palloy and friends will continue with their fantasies, come hell or high water. So it goes.  :P

SNIPPPET 1:

The bias against renewable funding and support is clear. Recent analysis found that over the first fifteen years an industry receives a subsidy, nuclear energy received an average of $3.3 billion, oil and gas averaged $1.8 billion,Fto and renewables averaged less than $0.4 billion.

Renewables received less than one-quarter of the support of oil and gas and less than one-eighth of the support that nuclear received during the early years of development, when strong investment can make a big difference. Yet even with this disparity, more of our energy supply now comes from renewables than from nuclear, which indicates the strength of renewables as a potential energy source.


SNIPPET 2:

The momentum behind renewable development came to a rapid halt as soon as Ronald Reagan was elected president. Not only did he remove the solar panels atop the White House, he also gutted funding for solar development and poured billions into developing a dirty synthetic fuel that was never brought to market.

Unnatural Gas: How Government Made Fracking Profitable (and Left Renewables Behind)

http://www.dissentmagazine.org/online_articles/unnatural-gas-how-government-made-fracking-profitable-and-left-renewables-behind

The TRUE COST of Carbon

Here's another video (over 3 years old, but still imperative viewing), with lots of no nonsense MATH, that a certain mathematican called Palloy has difficulty with due to his "UNreal world" world view. 

The bottom line for the reality based community (which excludes Palloy  and the entire fossil fuel industry biosphere wrecking crew   ) is that a dollar based cost benefit analysis misses the funfamental idea that there are rights that life forms have that cannot be price negotiated.

Palloy won't watch it but I urge you reality based folks to view it and pass it on to other humans, like yourselves, who do not lack common sense.  ;D

What is the Social Cost of Carbon Emissions?

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 22, 2017, 07:03:22 pm »

Quote
Agelbert
Zach, can you recommend a maintenance cost comparison study of an EV versus a gas guzzler covering several years? The best info I could find says the cost for an EV is 3 to 4 cents a mile versus 5 or 6 cents a mile for a gas guzzler. I think that operation and maintenenace for and EV is more like about a tenth of gas guzzzler costs. Nobody wants to just come out and say that gasoline is GUARANTEED to go UP while electricity is GUARANTEED to go DOWN as the years go by.

Also, I wish the up front cost of the vehicle was NOT figured into the operation and maintenance in these cost estimates. The glaring difference in actual day to day costs is what is important after you buy or lease the vehicle.
 
For example a "used" 2016 Leaf with less than a 1,000 miles on it can be purchased (WITH the full factury guarantee!) for less than $17,000. THIS is the kind of vehicle that should be used for cost comparison of operation and maintenance. I'm sure that leaf can be operated and maintained for much less than half what it costs to do the same for a gas guzzler.

I welcome comments and suggestions on how to get the best, accurate and objective info.



Matt > agelbert • an hour ago
Taking into account what we paid for our solar panels, we're probably paying $0.022 per mile for our EV.

My 2004 Honda probably costs $0.083 per mile just for gas. I'm probably averaging about $0.04/mile for ICE maintenance: oil change, timing belt, oil pan, etc... No point including tires, wipers, 12v battery, etc, since both cars have those, and they are very cheap compared to their lifetime. Hopefully, I'll never have to find out how much it takes to replace the EV's drive battery.

Edit: So that leaves a 10 cent difference per mile, before taking into account the damage done by fossil fuels. If you think a carbon tax should be $100/metric ton, add $0.03 per mile for the Honda.

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/07/22/electric-car-faq-answers/

Agelbert NOTE: A ten cent a mile difference, when you figure 100,000 miles, is a BIG deal!
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 22, 2017, 03:26:15 pm »

Kirsten Oulton, Model S owner and evangelist

Aug 25, 2015

My experience has been much like the answer supplied by George Everitt  below. In 16 months of use and 55,000 km (34,175 mi), our two maintenance expenses for a Model S (85) have been:

Windshield washer fluid; and

Winter tire storage ($100 CDN/year, includes Tesla swapping them out and balancing). We have a set of winter tires and summer tires (I live in Canada, so this is advisable), but neither set needs replacement yet. Best estimate gives us another 8 months of wear on each.

https://www.quora.com/Does-a-Tesla-car-have-very-minimal-maintenance-costs




Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 22, 2017, 03:14:10 pm »

Will Tesla's battery-centric drivetrain turn out to be its Achilles heel? ???

Hugh Rice Kelly, former Attorney

Answered Jul 14, 2017

The electric drive train is its defining strength. Amazingly few people understand that the Tesla drive train is based on the most powerful, reliable, time-tested form of motive power in the world—known to most Americans as the “diesel” locomotive. Very nearly all “diesel” locomotives use diesel engines to generate electricity which is then routed to electric traction motors which actually supply power to move the train. Think of that when you see a “diesel” powered set of locomotives start up a mile-long train of coal cars or oil tankers. Electric traction motors have been pulling almost all of the world’s railroad trains for more than a half century. In areas where overhead electric power has been available, pure electric trains have been handling tough railroad duty all over the world for a century.

Electric motive power has long ago conquered the difficult alpine grades in Europe and today powers most European trains. Electric powered trains are also capable of extremely high speeds: The world record for conventional wheeled manned passenger trains was set by France's TGV: it broke the world record in April 2007, reaching 357.2 mph on a 140 km section of track.

So anyone who thinks that electric powered vehicles are unreliable or somehow technologically vulnerable needs to do some homework.

Tesla’s automotive electric battery is not as time-tested as the electric traction motor, but Tesla has adopted the most conservative imaginable battery design philosophy, achieving an amazing degree of success. Unlike the spontaneous combustion disasters involving Boeing’s Dreamliner and the recent spontaneous “smart phone” fires, Tesla batteries have displayed no propensity to catch fire, and failures of any kind are rare.

The Tesla 85 kWh battery, for example, contains 7104 small cellular batteries similar to those used in laptop computers. It comprises 16 modules of 6 “bricks” each, each “brick” containing 74 individual cells. Each module has its own Battery Monitor Board which monitors each brick's voltage and samples temperature from four points within the module and reports this information to the Battery Management System via an internal communication bus. The BMS then uses this information to manage the high voltage battery temperature and state of charge. It communicates with the car’s central thermal management system, charger, and other channels. The battery has a sealed liquid coolant system, which controls heat, a key control factor in lithium ion batteries.

This carefully controlled system keeps the battery within a range calculated to preserve the battery over the long term. The design has paid off to an amazing degree: There are many Teslas that have logged over 100,000 miles while retaining 85 percent of their original battery capacity. My 2015 Model S P85D still retains 100 percent of the 253 mile range it had when I accepted delivery 25 months ago.

For a car primarily used for in-city driving, an electric car is superior to a car powered by an internal combustion engine (“ICE”). Unlike the ICE, you can plug in your car in the garage and find it fully charged every morning. You also don’t need to worry about excess drivetrain wear from stop and go traffic—the inefficiencies of an ICE under those conditions have few parallels in an electric car—not even the brakes, which are rarely used due to regenerative braking. The electric car is really convenient for ultra-short trips, because, unlike an ICE care, a Tesla does not need to be warmed up.

There are disadvantages to an electric car during highway travel, but as charging locations continue to multiply, the inconveniences will fade. But you will always need to plan and be sure you don’t drive somewhere you won’t be able to recharge your batteries.

https://www.quora.com/


An electric motor that lasts for 1,000,000 miles? Tesla is working on it
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 22, 2017, 01:45:02 pm »

You are frugal like I am. Don't compare our lifestyle with the average car buyer in the USA.

The average car buyer in the FSoA is me.  We buy Used Carz.  You can't afford new carz on the median income.  If you do buy one on the median income, you're an idiot and wasting your money.  New Carz are for the Top 20% of income earners.  EVs are for the top 20% also.  They cost too much.

RE

They are getting cheaper. I did a search for used Leaf EVs and I found a "used" Leaf (The Carfax report says it was a lease for an executive) with only 61 miles on it for sale at a very reasonable price. It comes with the complete factory 100,000 mile battery warranty.

I just searched again and it's gone. I guess they sold it. But there are some more good deals.

Check out the first one (2016 Leaf) at link with only 21 miles on it.

https://www.truecar.com/used-cars-for-sale/listings/nissan/leaf/location-05446/?searchRadius=250&sortOrder=MILEAGE_ASC

$12K.  I never paid more than $5K for a used car.

RE

The original Ford Falcon had an 85 hp straight six of 144 Cubic inches (2360 cc) and cost about $2000 new in 1960. It was a very basic car with no AC, no carpets, roll up windows, and a manual shifter on the steering column. Piece of **** car.

 I had a '64 Ford Econoline van in high school with the same engine. Woefully underpowered and the shifter linkage would lock up so I couldn't shift gears. One had to stop the car, get out and reach carefully into the grill, and line the shifter dogs back up by hand. LOL.

These fotos were stuck together, lucky i went hunting for it. 66 XP Falcon with the 170 Pursuit instead of 144 cube.. ex cop car.

Cars like that had column shift, a slippery vinyl bench seat and soft suspension, so they leaned over around corners. Surly probably lay his arm across the seat back and went around corners fast, so his date came sliding across to make the 2 headed driver and stick shift.

The original Ford Falcon had an 85 hp straight six of 144 Cubic inches (2360 cc) and cost about $2000 new in 1960. It was a very basic car with no AC, no carpets, roll up windows, and a manual shifter on the steering column. Piece of **** car.

 I had a '64 Ford Econoline van in high school with the same engine. Woefully underpowered and the shifter linkage would lock up so I couldn't shift gears. One had to stop the car, get out and reach carefully into the grill, and line the shifter dogs back up by hand. LOL.

When I was 16 my Dad took me to a used car lot to buy me car. Ford Falcon. The battery died 1 mile from the dealer.



This is close but not exact, don't remember its year, but this is close.

My gear shift was so bad that it jammed, and I had to get out and slide under the car and reassemble the gear joint back into female part!!!   This would happen about every two days. Wow, that was so many years ago it all seems like a dream.

The original Ford Falcon had an 85 hp straight six of 144 Cubic inches (2360 cc) and cost about $2000 new in 1960. It was a very basic car with no AC, no carpets, roll up windows, and a manual shifter on the steering column. Piece of **** car.

 I had a '64 Ford Econoline van in high school with the same engine. Woefully underpowered and the shifter linkage would lock up so I couldn't shift gears. One had to stop the car, get out and reach carefully into the grill, and line the shifter dogs back up by hand. LOL.

When I was 16 my Dad took me to a used car lot to buy me car. Ford Falcon. The battery died 1 mile from the dealer.



This is close but not exact, don't remember its year, but this is close.

My gear shift was so bad that it jammed, and I had to get out and slide under the car and reassemble the gear joint back into female part!!!   This would happen about every two days. Wow, that was so many years ago it all seems like a dream.

Oooh, let me play. My first car was a '64 Dodge Coronet, purchased in 1969.

  It looked very much like this. It had a slant 6; you'd open up the hood, and that little engine was in there, lying on its side.



I LOVED that car, and it served me well until it started losing oil. I should have had the engine rebuilt; but my father convinced me to get rid of it and buy a new car. Which was a 1971 Chevy Vega, with an aluminum block that blew up @ 40,000 miles. Proof of the axiom, "The poor man pays twice."   :(




Yes, you fine fellows have had long love affairs with your vehicles. Yes, we were ALL brainwashed to love all things about cars. I discovered that was stupid and costly. But not everybody can let go of expensive addictions that easy, as the comments I just read evidence.  :( :P

But since car owning history is in vogue here, this is my sad tale of spending too much money on vehicles powerd by polluting internal combustion CRAP engines:

1958 Cushman Husky scooter
1962 Vespa Scooter
1966 1956 Pontiac
1967 1957 Metropolitan
1968 Honda 125cc Motorcylce
1969 1967 Chevrolet Impala
1970 1964 Dodge Dart (push button transmission  :laugh:)
1973 1965 Piper Colt (an airplane  ;D with cloth over metal frame wings with a 108HP engine)
1975 1976 New Ford F150 supercab pickup truck
1977 Traded the Piper colt for a 1975 Oldsmobile (lasted less than a year - needed a top overhaul - then in ess than two months a major overhaul so I traded it for a Civic)
1978 1978 New Honda Civic CVCC
1983 1984 New Toyota Supra (Totalled within a year (hit from behind by an FBI agent speeding and changing lanes while the supra was at a full stop in a traffic jam on an off ramp - Insurance company went bankrupt so they did NOT pay me the loss and the Chase bank ruined my credit for not paying off the vehicel while the state insurance commissioner took two years to pay me for the vehicle loss).
1985 1985 New Mitsubishi Mirage
1986 1980 Oldsmobile
1988 1980 Cadillac
1989 1974 Ford Station Wagon
1990 1990 New Ford Probe Gt Turbo (Totaled in one month)
1991 1991 New Ford Probe (Had to turn in to the bank from bankruptcy within a year)
1992 1984 Lincoln continental (Totalled in 1996 from being rear ended at high speed by a Toyota pickup)
1997 1997 New Toyota Camry

 

Have a nice day.
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 21, 2017, 11:18:34 pm »

Chevy Bolt EV plant shutdown extended, due to slow Sonic sales (updated)

 John Voelcker

379 Comments Jul 21, 2017

One of the biggest tests of an automaker's discipline is what it does when sales start to ebb and inventories of unsold cars swell.

Does it keep the production lines churning, and dial up its incentives to keep new-vehicle deliveries flowing?

Or does it prioritize profitability and suspend production until inventories are back where they should be?

DON'T MISS: Bolt EV electric car sales after 6 months: how do they compare?

General Motors is now doing the latter, after seeing its inventories bulge to 105 days' worth of sales by the end of last month, according to a report by the Reuters news service, the company's highest inventory level in 10 years.

Worse yet, looking solely at passenger cars and netting out ever-more-popular crossovers and SUVs, Fortune notes that GM's inventories were 126 days, as calculated by industry trade journal Automotive News.

That's more than twice the 60 days' worth that analysts consider ideal.

EDITOR'S NOTE: This post, originally published July 18, was updated July 21 to reflect additional information provided by a GM line worker at the Orion Assembly Plant.

First 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV buyers, Fremont, California: Bobby Edmonds, Bill Mattos, Steve HenryFirst 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV buyers, Fremont, California: Bobby Edmonds, Bill Mattos, Steve Henry

The factories GM shut down include the Lake Orion Assembly plant where both the Chevrolet Bolt EV electric car and the aging Chevy Sonic subcompact sedan and hatchback are built.

The Sonic's sales are down 37 percent for the first half of this year over the same period last year.


But not too surprisingly, the Bolt EV gets the headlines in recent news coverage  of that plant's summer shutdown, which GM recently lengthened.

The Reuters report specifically underscores that it's softening sales of the Sonic that led to the production suspension at Lake Orion:

A spokesman for the company said the shutdown at Orion was "due solely to softening sales of the Sonic" model, adding that its production plan for the Bolt for this year was unchanged.

UPDATE: This explanation was later confirmed by Don Lockrey, who said he worked at the Orion Assembly Plant,  in a comment on another article that was posted by a Bolt owner to the Chevy Bolt EV Owners Group on Facebook.

Lockrey wrote:

We added an extra week for shutdown because of slowing sales of the Sonic. I am assuming because of gas prices, because a $16,000 car isn't as prized when gas is low.

Another reason for the extra week was to complete bank systems and redo the assembly line to INCREASE Bolt production. The jobs are all set to produce Bolts on a two-Sonic, one-Bolt mix.

They are changing the mix to a 50/50 split which requires adjustment.

Chevy Bolt

Chevrolet sold 7,592 Bolt EVs in the U.S. from January through June, as it slowly adding new states to the initial pair of California and Oregon where the car was launched in mid-December.

At that sales rate—which should increase in the second half of the year as all states get their cars, and both dealership personnel and buyers become more familiar with the 238-mile electric car—GM now has a 111-day supply of Bolt EVs at its dealers.

Over the same six-month period, Chevy delivered 17,958 Sonics, almost two and a half times its total Bolt sales.

The Bolt EV, with a base price of $37,500 before incentives, will be available in all 50 states by the end of next month.

The other GM plants whose summer shutdowns were lengthened all build passenger cars, not SUVs: the Chevrolet Cruze compact sedan in Lordstown, Ohio; the Malibu mid-size sedan near Kansas City; and the Impala large sedan in Oshawa, Ontario.

_______________________________________

Follow GreenCarReports on Facebook and Twitter.

http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1111581_chevy-bolt-ev-plant-shutdown-extended-due-to-slow-sonic-sales

Aglebert NOTE:
For Big Oil cheer leader and consitent attacker of EVs, Tyler Durden at Zero Hedge and anybody else that blames the Bolt for this plant production pause, DINNER IS SERVED:


Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 21, 2017, 10:35:36 pm »

I read the article several times, looking for the bits that tried to explain WHY the manufacturers wanted their products to fail, and the only explanation was "Not invented here" syndrome. This was backed up by calling The Ford Falcon "a crap-can" and the Ford Escort a "stinker". I had 2 Falcons (XA and XE) and an Escort (RS-1600), and while the XE had weak engine, weighed down by air-con, and servo pumps and auto transmission, and high weight, I would have thought ALL american cars had this style.  I can easily imagine that the manufacturers would have thought "the american public" won't want this model, but "designed to fail"?

Most of the explanation came in your follow up and needs to be backed by straight forward statistics. Are maintenance costs for EVs REALLY a tenth of ICs' ?  I include changing batteries as maintenance.  If so, that would mean a gradual change in the proportions of post-sale profits over decades, and salesmen wouldn't be bothered about that because it doesn't affect their immediate commissions.  In any case, that wouldn't affect what the manufacturers chose to make, there government subsidies to make EVs would matter far more.

I can't imagine car manufacturers care what the oil companies think (or about global warming), but I do think they worry about the rocketing price of battery metals.  There is no way I could charge my EV's battery at home without completely re-laying new mains cables to handle the load, so I would never buy one.

I have only bought one new car (the Escort) and I put my best suit on to try to give the impression I was rich, the salesman (who was driving the demonstrator to work every day) saw me puzzling over the mass of optional extras and offered me the demonstrator, with all the extras, at a good price
and then cut his price when I still pondered.  He was really keen to get my signature on a contract that day.  It was an excellent car, and went like the clappers for a 1600.

The fact is Chevy are having an extended lay-off period.  I think it is all down to the demand for new cars in general in a stagnant wage situation.  Some businesses will fail, making the situation better for the others, but worse for the workforce and their communities.

You are frugal like I am. Don't compare our lifestyle with the average car buyer in the USA. That would be a huge error on your part. Also, if you want to ignore the FACT that the refining of crude REQUIRES the production of of about 40% liquid fuels (which make ip the LION's share of profit for Big Oil), then you will never understand why they have such a vested interest in keeping the public AWAY from EVs.

The maintenace costs on EVs are MUCH lower than for gas guzzlers. That is not in doubt at this time, though I really don't have the data on hand to give you some hard numbers. I will dig around and post it on this thread for you to peruse shortly.

Palloy, here is the latest news, which confirms that the issue (at least officially) was NEVER the Bolt "lagging sales", as your disinformation article from the fossil fuel cheer leaders at Zero-Hedge disingenuously claims.

You may be right and I'm jumping to conclusions about the Bolt being set up to fail. But your refusal to see the MASSIVE amount of crap gas guzzler production money out there in comparison to the pittance spent so far on EVs by GM is shameful for someone claiming to be objective.

At any rate, here is the latest. As I tried to point out to you, and you kept dancing around it, the ISSUE WAS, AND IS, THE SLOW SONIC SALES, NOT the Bolt "slow sales"!

Chevy Bolt Production — An Insider’s Viewpoint

July 21st, 2017 by Steve Hanley

SNIPPET:

Quote
The Bolt story got a ton of comments, one of them from a commenter who says he got a response from someone working at the Orion Township factory, a Don Lockrey. Don sees things different from how we presented the story. Here’s his comment in full: “I work at the factory. You’re article is wrong. We added an extra week for shutdown because of slowing sales of the Sonic. I am assuming because of gas prices, as a $16k car isn’t as prized when gas is low. Another reason for the extra week was to complete bank systems and re do the assembly line to increase Bolt production.

“The jobs are all set to produce Bolts on a 2 Sonic, One Bolt mix. They are changing the mix to a 50/50 split which requires adjustments. For all the tesla fan boys, enjoy the squeaks rattles, fit and finish issues and recalls as your Model 3 was crammed into a 5000 car a week schedule. Oh, you thought your waiting list to get your car was long? Wait till you have a service issue with no dealer network.”

Thanks for that insider information, Don. We heard from other Bolt defenders who felt we were being too one-sided in our coverage of the Bolt. With Don’s information that Chevy is actually planning to increase production of the Bolt, we are attempting to correct the record and report some favorable news about the all-electric car from The General.

If there is an issue with the Bolt, it appears to be that Chevy is doing a poor job figuring out where to send the cars that have been built. Also, it must be said that manufacturers have little influence over how dealers sell their products. Decades ago, the car companies used to push the dealers around at will, even opening competing dealerships across the street in some cases to punish a dealer who had earned their displeasure.

New state laws reduced the power of the factories and made the influence of local dealer associations greater. Much of the resistance to the direct sales model preferred by Tesla comes from those same dealer associations, which wield tremendous power in some state legislatures, especially in Michigan and Texas.

I have reached out to Paul Masse Chevrolet, which is located about 20 miles away from my home. Another comment indicated they are one of the leading sellers of Chevrolet’s electric cars — the Bolt and the Volt — in America and that their inventory is down to 78 cars. That means they have moved over 100 Bolts in the past 30 days or so. Their success selling EVs resulted in a personal visit from Mary Barra, CEO of General Motors. If I am able to meet and speak with the Paul Masse people, I will share what I learn with you in a subsequent story. Stay tuned.

For an ongoing look at Chevy Bolt sales, see:
“Electric Car Sales (Monthly Reports)".
https://cleantechnica.com/2017/07/21/chevy-bolt-production-insiders-viewpoint/

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