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Topic Summary

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: September 05, 2019, 06:02:46 pm »


10 Ways To Preserve The Summer Harvest 😋:
The end of the summer is the perfect time to think about extending that bountiful organic harvest into the colder season. Eating with the season and preserving the harvest is the most effective way to save money on organic food. We've uncovered 10 unique ways to continue eating organic food long into the winter months when organic produce is more expensive and not as available.

Read more about preserving your harvest in our new blog here.

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 29, 2019, 12:30:59 pm »

THE (FAKE) FOOD INDUSTRY

THE POISONED-INDUSTRIAL FOOD COMPLEX


[
How to opt out:

1. Learn to use a kitchen knife and how cook
2. Buy your food from the produce department
3. Spend the extra money and get non-poisoned organic produce (and make the acquaintance of some local, ethical farmers.)

Click here to support: The Real Food Channel

https://realfoodchannel.com/the-fake-food-industry/

Excellent advice.

The search for organic food pays dividends in terms of flavor as well. My wife made some organic carrots and I was amazed.

If you think nutrition is depleted in our food now, wait until the topsoil is fully depleted and rising CO2 levels exact their own toll.

True. Your wife is smart. My wife refuses to buy anything that isn't organic. When I think about how many twinkies, sugar pops and other assorted crap I ate from the time I was knee high to a grasshopper, it is a wonder I'm still here.

As you said, nutrition deficit in most food will all get MUCH more severe as we continue our journey in the Age of 🦕🦖 Hydrocarbon Hellspawn Stupid.
Posted by: Surly1
« on: August 29, 2019, 06:24:07 am »

THE (FAKE) FOOD INDUSTRY

THE POISONED-INDUSTRIAL FOOD COMPLEX


[
How to opt out:

1. Learn to use a kitchen knife and how cook
2. Buy your food from the produce department
3. Spend the extra money and get non-poisoned organic produce (and make the acquaintance of some local, ethical farmers.)

Click here to support: The Real Food Channel

https://realfoodchannel.com/the-fake-food-industry/

Excellent advice.

The search for organic food pays dividends in terms of flavor as well. My wife made some organic carrots and I was amazed.

If you think nutrition is depleted in our food now, wait until the topsoil is fully depleted and rising CO2 levels exact their own toll.
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 28, 2019, 09:41:26 pm »

THE (FAKE) FOOD INDUSTRY

THE POISONED-INDUSTRIAL FOOD COMPLEX


HOW IT WORKS 


Here’s a simple rule of thumb:


If it comes in a bag, a can, a bottle, or a box, it’s probably crap.

Here’s the deal:

The industrial food business is bigger than the oil industry and every bit as ruthless.

They’ve wired the US in such a way that their costs are subsidized by tax payers and they are allowed to put pretty much anything they want in their products without meaningful oversight.

On the one side, farmers are gouged and beaten up. On the other side consumers are charged $1 for a penny’s worth of nutrition laden with a nickel’s worth of chemical garbage.

No other country in the world – including Third World countries – eats such low quality food and it shows in our health statistics.

The US is world leader in degenerative diseases – cancer, diabetes, and heart disease – all to the delight of an equally ruthless medical services (don’t call it “health care”) industry.

How to opt out:

1. Learn to use a kitchen knife and how cook
2. Buy your food from the produce department
3. Spend the extra money and get non-poisoned organic produce (and make the acquaintance of some local, ethical farmers.)

Click here to support: The Real Food Channel

https://realfoodchannel.com/the-fake-food-industry/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 19, 2019, 01:54:15 pm »

📢 10 COMMON POISONS FOUND IN EVERYDAY PRODUCTS

EASY TO AVOID IF YOU’RE AWARE

MORE FROM DR. AXE

This is a topic we’ve covered a lot and these two guys cover this important topic as well as anyone I’ve seen.

They keep it simple and get right to the point.

10 common poisons found in everyday products and how to easily avoid them.


There’s plenty of healthy food available.

Click here to support: The Real Food Channel

THE BRASSCHECK/REAL FOOD READING LIST
We recommend these books as a foundation for educating yourself about health in the 21st Century.

www.brasscheck.com/video/the-brasscheck-real-food-reading-list/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 05, 2019, 06:00:24 pm »

😋

Have you tried grilling eggs for essential choline?

Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola Fact Checked
August 05, 2019
 
STORY AT-A-GLANCE

• The husband of author Emily Farris decided to experiment and put several of their homegrown eggs on the grill after making dinner one evening, only to discover a decidedly delicious smoky-flavored perfectly cooked egg for his efforts

• Eggs are rich in the essential nutrient choline, which your body uses to normalize metabolism, as a neuroprotective substance and to regulate homocysteine; choline deficiency may lead to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), one of the most common forms of liver disease in the U.S.

• The egg is versatile, lending itself to being baked, fried, steamed, poached, boiled or added to other foods. By the 1970s concerns over cholesterol dropped the average daily consumption of eggs, but a 1999 study from Harvard University demonstrated there was no association between eating eggs and heart disease

• High-quality, pasture-raised hens produce nutrient-dense eggs with bright orange yolks; consider purchasing from a local farmer, raising your own or seeking out store-bought eggs ranked high on The Cornucopia Institute Organic Egg Scorecard

Full article:

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/08/05/choline-in-eggs.aspx
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 05, 2019, 05:44:40 pm »


Why you should eat the apple core

Analysis by Dr. Joseph Mercola Fact Checked

August 05, 2019
 
STORY AT-A-GLANCE

Apples’ antioxidant power is contained in the peel. However, recent research shows the core of the apple contains plenty of beneficial bacteria (probiotics)

► A typical apple contains about 100 million bacteria. Organic apples have far greater diversity compared to conventional apples, and contain higher amounts of bacteria that enhance flavor

Organic apples were the only ones found to contain Lactobacilli, bacteria that break down sugars associated with healthy digestion, robust immune function and even mental health

Conventional apples were found to contain Escherichia coli and Shigella — two Enterobacteriaceae species associated with foodborne illness, as both produce potent shigatoxin. Neither of these species was found in organic apples

► Bacterial colonization of fruit begins at pollination, and the ultimate composition of a fruit’s microbiota is actually influenced by the microbial community found in the pollen

Full article:  

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/08/05/why-you-should-eat-the-apple-core.aspx
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: May 01, 2019, 11:09:27 pm »

May 1, 2019

 
Don't Fall for the Lab-Fed Meat Hype, It's Truly Mad Science

Grass Fed or Lab Bred Meats — Which Is Better for Your Health and the Environment?

Written by Dr. Joseph Mercola Fact Checked
 
STORY AT-A-GLANCE

► Industrial agriculture is one of the most unsustainable practices of modern civilization, contributing to air pollution, water pollution, aquifer depletion, deforestation, rising carbon emissions and the depletion, erosion and poisoning of soils

► The long-term answer lies in the transition to sustainable, regenerative, chemical-free farming practices, not fake lab-created meat substitutes, which are really just another way to patent and control the food supply

► Fake meats may ultimately create more problems than they solve, as laboratory derived meat substitutes are not part of the ecological cycle and health hazards are as of yet entirely unknown

► On April 1, 2019, Burger King started offering the Impossible Whopper, made with a meat substitute, at 59 locations in the St. Louis area. If customer demand turns out to be sufficient, the fake burger will be launched at all 7,200 U.S. locations

► The meat substitute created by Impossible Foods contains a mix of wheat, coconut oil, potatoes and “heme” derived from genetically engineered yeast

Full article:

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2019/05/06/grass-fed-or-lab-bred-meats.aspx
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: April 07, 2019, 01:21:17 pm »

The High-Protein Leafy Plant You've Probably Never Heard Of

It's definitely not your mother's leafy iceberg lettuce. For one, it's rich in protein - a quirk in the plant kingdom. Plus, it's a major superfood with more than 90 vitamins, minerals, amino acids and more.

Quote
I’ll be the first to say that the word “superfood” has become one of the most overused – and sometimes misused – words in the English language.

However, what other term can you use to describe a food that, gram for gram when dried, has…

֍ 15 times the potassium of bananas

֍ 12 times the vitamin C of oranges

֍ 9 times the protein of yogurt, and

֍ 3 times the vitamin A of carrots

 
Read More >>

 
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: December 29, 2018, 05:51:01 pm »

EcoWatch

Authority Reports

Dec. 24, 2018 12:10PM EST

Himalayan Pink Crystal Salt contains the full spectrum of 84 minerals and trace elements. It is an unrefined, unprocessed and “Raw”.

What You Need to Know About Pink Himalayan Salt

This sponsored post was brought to you by Authority Reports and written by Albert Davidoff

Many people claim that pink Himalayan salt offers incredible health benefits and that it is loaded with minerals. It is a type of salt that is mined in Pakistan, near the Himalayas and it is naturally pink in color. Is pink Himalayan salt really healthier than regular table salt or is it nothing more than speculation? This article looks at the evidence in order to determine whether pink Himalayan salt or regular salt offers the most health benefits and what the key differences are.

Need more info on what natural health products or supplements to buy? Authority Reports evaluate a wide variety of natural health products to determine what would be best for your unique situation.

What Exactly is Salt?

Salt is a mineral which largely consists of a compound called sodium chloride. Some people even use the words 'sodium' and 'salt' interchangeably—this is because salt contains around 98% of sodium chloride in weight. (Read more about the side effects, interactions and dosage instructions of sodium chloride).

There are two ways in which salt can be produced: by extracting it from underground salt mines (solid salt) or by evaporating salt water. Before it ends up on your dinner table, it also goes through a refining process in order to remove any other minerals (except for sodium chloride) and in order to remove any impurities. Sometimes anticaking agents are added in order to absorb moisture and often iodine is also included as this helps consumers to prevent ending up with an iodine deficiency.

It is absolutely essential to include salt in your diet as it plays an important role in muscle and nerve contractions as well as a variety of biological functions. On the other hand - too much salt can also lead to heart disease and high blood pressure. Many people have turned to pink Himalayan salt as they believe that it is a healthier alternative and because they believe that too much table salt can potentially be harmful to their health.

What is Himalayan Salt?

Himalayan salt gets extracted from the Khewra Salt Mine in Pakistan, near the Himalayas. It is one of the largest and oldest salt mines to be found in the world. The salt that can be harvested from this mine has apparently been formed from the evaporation of large bodies of water in ancient times. It is believed that Himalayan salt is composed of remnants of the primal, original sea, as it comes from salt mines located more than 5000 feet deep below the Himalayan Mountain range. It has, therefore, experienced tremendous pressure over hundreds and thousands of years and is said to be extremely pure.

 

It is much more natural than table salt, as it has been minimally processed and hand-extracted, which makes it free of additives and also an unrefined product. It is also mostly comprised of sodium chloride, but because of the natural harvesting process, it also contains many other trace elements and minerals that are not included in regular table salt. It is estimated that it contains up to 84 different trace elements and minerals. It is these minerals and especially iron which gives it its pink color.

How Can Pink Himalayan Salt Be Used?

There are many non-dietary and dietary uses for pink Himalayan salt:

Cook with it or eat it—you can use pink salt in the same way that you would use table salt. It can also be used as a cooking surface. Large blocks of salt can be used to sear, grill and impart a salty flavor to foods such as meats. It can be purchased in coarse varieties or finely ground.
Non-dietary uses—it can be used to soothe sore muscles and improve skin by using it in a salt bath. Pink Himalayan salt lamps can also apparently remove air pollutants. It is also common for people to spend time in man-made pink Himalayan salt caves in order to improve respiratory and skin problems.

Health Claims of Pink Himalayan Salt

As mentioned above, both pink salt and regular table salt contain mostly sodium chloride, but pink salt has up to 84 other trace elements and minerals. These include minerals such as calcium, potassium, molybdenum, and strontium.

Studies show that table salt contains more sodium and that Himalayan salt contains more iron, magnesium, potassium, and calcium.

The following health claims are commonly made about pink salt:

֍ Increase libido

֍ Reduce signs of aging

֍ Improve respiratory disease

֍ Improve sleep quality

֍ Help to balance your body's pH

֍ Regulate blood sugar

Even though there are some studies that support the various benefits experienced when exposed to salt caves, such as the treatment of various lung diseases, there is little to support the health claims made above.

Researchers have found, for example, that very low-salt diets may contribute to sleeping issues, suggesting that an adequate amount of sodium is essential for quality sleep. The additional minerals that can be found in Himalayan salt are present in very small quantities, which means that it won't effectively balance your body's pH. Also, libido, aging and blood sugar levels are mostly controlled by other factors and there are no studies that suggest that pink salt will influence these aspects of your health. (Learn more about what foods will assist in controlling your blood sugar levels).

The Conclusion

There are no studies at this stage that show that pink Himalayan salt has more health benefits than regular table salt. However, Himalayan salt would be more beneficial to your overall health and wellbeing as it does not contain any additives or harmful artificial ingredients, making it an excellent natural alternative. Also, remember that table salt is one of the main sources of iodine. If you are using Himalayan salt, make sure to get iodine from other food sources such as fish, dairy products and seaweed.

Pink Himalayan Salt


https://www.ecowatch.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-pink-himalayan-salt-2624280381.html
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: October 19, 2018, 02:19:51 pm »

EcoWatch


Find Out Your 'Foodprint': New Website Helps You Shop, Cook and Eat More Sustainably

By Olivia Rosane

Oct. 18, 2018 12:12PM EST

Two days after World Food Day, an innovative nonprofit has launched a website to help you reduce the environmental impact of the food you eat.

FoodPrint, designed by GRACE Communications Foundation, was created to educate consumers about everything that goes into common food items, from farm to fridge, so that they can make sustainable choices.

"Your 'foodprint' is the result of all of everything it takes to get your food from the farm to your plate. Many of those processes are invisible to consumers," the website explains.


GRACE Communications Foundation is all about spreading awareness about the environmental and public health impacts of the industrial food system in order to promote more sustainable alternatives, and its latest venture offers all sorts of tips for food lovers looking for greener diets.

Here are some of the highlights ✨ of how you can shrink your foodprint at all stages of the meal prep process.

Shopping 🎍

֍ Look for Good Labels: The site offers guides by food type for which labels guarantee certain standards, which are less stringent and which are just marketing ploys. For produce, for example, USDA Organic and Demeter Certified Biodynamic are the best bets, while terms like "natural" or "pesticide free" are basically meaningless.

֍ Choose Low-Impact Foods: The Real Food Encyclopedia assesses the sustainability of more than 200 common foods, and also offers facts and cooking tips. In the U.S., wild rice is grown with water intensive methods in California, which is suffering from increasing drought. Barley, meanwhile, uses a relatively small amount of water and helps prevent erosion and weed growth.

֍ Eat Seasonably: The Seasonal Food Guide uses data from the Natural Resources Defense Council, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and state agricultural offices to offer the most comprehensive guide to what is in season in all 50 states.


Cooking 😋

1. Plan Ahead: The post "15 Easy Ways to Reduce Food Waste" offers helpful tips for planning meals to avoid throwing things away, from creating a menu based around ingredients you already have to making sure you don't buy more than you can use.

2. Use All of the Foods You Buy: The post "Cook Like a Chef to Reduce Food Waste" explains how cooks around the world have crafted recipes to use all of an ingredient, even when it's less than fresh. A tough rooster can be the base for a succulent coq au vin, broccoli leaves are delicious and stale bread can be turned into breadcrumbs.

3. Reduce Storage and Packaging Waste: From plastic shopping bags to disposable storage containers to paper napkins, there are a lot of non-food items that can get wasted in the kitchen. "Keeping Kitchen Waste to a Minimum" offers solutions like reusing plastic packaging containers as storage, washing and reusing free bags and heading to flea markets for cheap cloth napkins.


Dining Out 🧐

1. Support Sustainable Restaurants: Guides like Certified Green Restaurants or Zero FoodPrint can help you find restaurants that have committed to using sustainable food, reduced packaging and less water, among other concerns. The Restaurant Opportunities Center's National Diner's Guide can help you find places that have committed to paying their staff a living wage.

2. Check the Menu:
If a restaurant isn't certified, you can check the menu to see if it offers local, seasonal produce or is trying to serve asparagus in January in the Midwest.

3. Reduce Waste: If you are eating in or getting takeout, you can reduce food and packaging waste by sharing menu items, taking leftovers home and bringing your own reusable straws or drink containers.

https://www.ecowatch.com/foodprint-food-waste-sustainability-website-2613339060.html

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 12, 2018, 12:29:48 pm »


The four-leaf clover is an uncommon variation of the common, three-leaved clover. The three-leaf clover or shamrock had been used by St. Patrick as a metaphor for the Christian Trinity. According to tradition, such leaves bring good luck to their finders, especially if found accidentally. In addition, each leaf is believed to represent something:

the first is for faith,

the second is for hope, the

third is for love,

and the fourth is for luck


Quote
It has been estimated that there are approximately 10,000 three-leaf clovers for every four-leaf clover; however, this probability has not deterred collectors who have reached records as high as 160,000 four-leaf clovers.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four-leaf_clover]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four-leaf_clover

Agelbert NOTE: When I was a kid in Kansas, I used to eat clover leaves and stems by the bunches. They have a nice sour pickly taste. I never did eat the flowers though. I figured if bees liked them, some small bugs might like them too and I would eat them by mistake. Bugs never were my thing.  :P :D

The word "shamrock" is derived from the Irish word seamróg, which means "clover". White clover is the real Irish shamrock.

A lot of popular images you see for shamrocks show leaves that look more like our friend the wood sorrel, but clover is the real thing.

The binomial name for white clover is Trifolium repens. Red clover is Trifolium pratense.

All of those are Latin words. Trifolium means "three leaves", repens means "recent, sudden, or fresh", and pratense means "found in meadows."

The clovers are native to Europe, Asia, and northern Africa. They were introduced to the Americas by settlers. Clover is commonly used as fodder for livestock and is also a valuable soil builder.

Red Clover Herb

Eating clover

The leaves, flowers, seeds, and roots of clovers are all edible.
😋

The young leaves, taken before the plant flowers, can be eaten raw in salads. As the plant matures, cooking the leaves is recommended. The dried leaves are said to add a slightly vanilla-like flavor to baked goods. In my own experience with clover leaves, I found them to be rather bitter (maybe I picked them at the wrong time). I stick to the flowers.

The roots should be eaten cooked.

The flowers and seeds are the parts of the clover that are of greatest interest to most foragers. The flowers are used raw in salads as well as sauteed, stir-fried, or fried as fritters. They are also popular for making teas and wines.

The flowers and seeds can be dried and ground into a flour.

http://www.squidoo.com/trifolium
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 17, 2018, 06:45:30 pm »

center]Now here's something good and wild that you CAN eat![/center]


Daylillies are known as the poor man's asparagus. A nice seasonal summer treat!
Cooking with wild edibles

Please Do Eat the Daylilies
 
Both the buds and the blossoms of daylilies are edible, a fact I regrettably learned only after I had dug out numerous flowering clusters encroaching on my lawn. But now I get a kick out of astonishing friends when I casually pluck a daylily "bean" from their backyard patch, and take a bite. Next thing you know, they're inviting me to gather a handful, which I'm happy to add to my next stir-fry. And they're happy to know that when the vivid flowers bloom, they will make a sweet-spicy bonus in the kitchen.
 
Daylilies are a common garden plant that have "gone wild." They're found throughout most parts of the United States from late spring through summer, often near sunny fields, roadsides and empty lots.   
 
Buds are distinguished from the plant's non-edible fruits by their layered interiors. Choose smallish buds that are just beginning to open and cook them as you would beans: boil and serve them with butter or add chilled, tender-cooked buds to salads. Or, if you happen upon a spicy batch (they're typically mild-flavored, like beans or zucchini), stir-fry them with Asian flavors.
 
Daylily buds will keep in the refrigerator for several days, but the delicate flowers (trumpet-shaped blooms that grow in multiples on a leafless stalk) should be consumed the same day they are picked; they are very short-lived. You can add the petals to egg dishes, soups and salads, or dip whole flowers in batter and deep-fry them, as you would squash blossoms.

http://www.organicvalley.coop/recipes/features/wild-edibles/please-do-eat-the-daylilies/

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: June 06, 2018, 03:09:58 pm »

Modern Farmer

May. 27, 2018 07:45AM EST

More Than Good Looks: Try These 10 Edible Flowers 😋

By Brian Barth

Eating flowers seems almost heretical. If plants could talk, wouldn't they say, you can look, even sniff, but please don't chow down on my pretty petals? The dainty apple flower, after all, is what gives way to the fruit, and thus the seed, ensuring the cycle of life continues. Do you dare give into the temptation to pluck it for food?

Many a chef certainly has. But most folks are clueless to the vast array of edible flowers. Apple blossoms, for example, impart a delicate floral flavor to fruit salads, along with a heavenly aroma. With many herbs, the flowers taste just like the leaf—chive flowers are a colorful way to infuse salad dressing with a garlic flavor.

On the other hand, some flowers are technically edible, but unpleasantly acrid. Chrysanthemums, for example, or begonias. One reference describes the flavor of wax begonias as slightly bitter with "a hint of swamp."

A word of warning before we get on to our list of edibles: Exercise caution when using flowers in the kitchen; many are poisonous. Those daffodils in your perennial border could cause nausea, diarrhea, itchiness, stupor, convulsions or even death, depending on how much you eat. (In almost all cases it's not just the flower that's poisonous, it's the entire plant.) Below, you'll fine a list of safe-to-consume flowers that we think you'll enjoy, with a few thoughts on how to grow and use them. And if you're ever unsure, here's a list of common poisonous ☠️ plants whose flowers you never want to ingest.

field marigold (Calendula arvensis)

Calendula
Annual
All Zones

In the Kitchen: These cheery flowers have a fairly neutral, nondescript flavor and are used to brighten-up both salads and sweets. Pastry chefs sometimes use Calendulas to make floral designs on cheesecakes and other goodies. Because the golden-orange petals hold their hue when cooked, they're sometimes used as a saffron substitute as well.

In the Garden: Calendula is easy to grow from seed, and often reseeds itself in the garden each year without any effort on the part of the gardener. Needs full sun and regular water.


orange or tawny daylily (Hemerocallis fulva)

Daylily
Perennial
Zones 3 to 9

In the Kitchen: Most types of lilies are mildly toxic when consumed, but not daylilies. (Though botanically speaking, daylilies are not a true lily.) Daylily blossoms are meatier than most flower petals, with a succulent texture and a mildly sweet taste, similar to romaine lettuce. Chop them up and add them to salads, but be sure to sample the flavor first, as some daylily varieties taste better than others. Try stuffing them with herbed cheese or dipping the unopened flower buds in batter and frying them up as an hors d'oeuvre.

In the Garden: Daylilies are generally sold as a potted plant and are easy to grow in sun or part sun, as long as you provide ample moisture. In rich soil, they spread to form extensive colonies.


Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

Dandelion
Perennial
Zones 3 to 9

In the Kitchen: Adventurous foodies relish the bitter flavor of dandelion greens in salads and soups, though few realize the flowers are also edible. Use dandelion flowers exactly as you would calendula (a close botanical relative). The flavor is sweeter if picked immediately after the flowers open.

In the Garden: Dandelions can be found growing as a weed almost everywhere (lawns, sidewalk cracks, soccer fields), though you can purchase seeds if you want to establish a bed for culinary use. The plant needs full sun and is drought tolerant, once established.


elderberries (Sambucus berries ) and their flowers

Elderberry
Zones 3 to 9

In the Kitchen: Elderberry flowers have a light, honey-like aroma and taste, and they're often used to flavor white wine, champagne, lemonade, iced tea, and other summery drinks. You can sprinkle the tiny individual flowers in salads, or fry the dome-shaped clusters whole to make elderberry fritters. Beware that elderberry foliage is mildly toxic, as is the uncooked fruit (the cooked fruit, however, is edible and delicious).

In the Garden: Elderberries are typically purchased as a potted plant, and are easy to grow in full sun or partial shade. Water frequently until established.


Borage ( Borago officinalis)

Borage
Annual
All Zones

In the Kitchen: Borage flowers have a mild, cucumber-esque flavor and are used to jazz-up salads, drinks, and savory dishes. The plant's electric-blue hue is a great compliment to calendula's golden tones, making for a photo-worthy plating.

In the Garden: Borage is easily grown from seed, and typically reseeds itself in the garden year after year. Drought tolerant.


Lavender (Lavandula Angustifolia Grosso)

Lavender
Zones 4 to 9

In the Kitchen: Lavender flowers have a unique, savory flavor with a hint of floral sweetness, and they're usually employed in summer drinks, ice cream, chocolate, and other sweets. Rub the flower buds between your fingers to separate the tiny individual flowers and sprinkle them into your dish.

In the Garden: Lavender is typically purchased as a potted plant. Grow it in a location with full sun and well-drained soil. Lavender is highly drought tolerant—once established, water only when the soil is bone dry.


Pansy (Viola tricolor)

Pansy
Annual
All Zones

In the Kitchen: Pansies are one of the few flowers that come in every color of the rainbow. They have a mild, nondescript flavor and are used primarily for decorating salads and desserts. Use violets, a close relative of pansies, in the same way.

In the Garden: Pansies are typically grown from seed. They thrive in locations with rich, moist soil and part sun. Pansies suffer in the heat of summer, so they're primarily grown as spring and fall annuals.


Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis)

Hibiscus
Hardiness Zone Varies by Species

In the Kitchen: Hibiscus flowers have a cranberry-like flavor with tropical notes. Though they're most often made into iced tea or infused into other cold drinks, chopped hibiscus flowers add a tangy spunk to salads and desserts.

In the Garden: There are numerous edible species of hibiscus, but it is the Jamaican species Hibiscus sabdariffa that is most known for its flavor. Hibiscus is typically purchased as a potted plant. Needs full sun and ample irrigation.


Nasturtium (Tropaeolum)

Nasturtium
Annual
All Zones

In the Kitchen: Nasturtium flowers have a peppery zest similar to watercress, to which the plant is closely related. They are primarily used in salads and as a garnish for hors d'oeuvres. Though the tubular flowers are large and sturdy enough to stuff with cheese or tapenade.

In the Garden: Nasturtium is easily grown from seed in partial shade or full sun, and often reseed themselves in the garden. Thrives in rich soil with regular irrigation.


Rose (Rosa rubiginosa)

Rose
Zones 3 to 10

In the Kitchen: Most people pick roses as a centerpiece for their table or to give as a symbol of their affection, but their culinary qualities are unsurpassed. Roses taste much like they smell, but with a slightly bitter undertone. Use in drinks, desserts, and salads, or make rose petal jam.

In the Garden: There are literally hundreds of rose varieties to choose from, some of which are much easier to grow and others. Iceberg roses and Knock Out roses are two of the most foolproof varieties. Roses thrive in a location with rich, well-drained soil and full sun. They require regular irrigation

https://www.ecowatch.com/edible-flowers-2571727474.html
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: May 18, 2018, 09:32:00 pm »

Agelbert NOTE: This short video has very interesting info about how we got the type of flour we now mostly use.

The Western Pattern Diet

Planet Earth FilmsPRO

John Downes explains the nature of the Western Pattern diet.


History and Culture

Planet Earth FilmsPRO

Legendary Australian sourdough baker John Downes on the history and culture of sourdough bread (Part 1).



Hydration 💧

Planet Earth FilmsPRO

Not all fours are the same. Here John demonstrates how to hydrate flour grown in the the hot South Australian Wheatbelt before baking a wholemeal loaf with it.




Making Wholemeal Pt 1 😋

Planet Earth FilmsPRO

Part 1 of John's wholemeal sourdough bread baking tutorial.

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: March 20, 2018, 03:20:37 pm »


Unlikely to work with so much dirt about.  Potential for methanol poisoning.

This is interesting. Having lived many years in the tropics, I am familiar with banana plants and plantain plants used for various purposes besides fermenting or eating the fruit. You can chop the whole plant off just above the base of the trunk after  you have harvested the fruit if you have a need for drinking water. You make a wide bowl shaped cut in the trunk base. You then allow it to fill with water from the roots. You scoop that water out. You allow the bowl to fill anoterh time. You scoop that water out too (the first two water products are too bitter tasting). The third time you can drink the water. The U.S. Marines recommended this for jungle survival during WWII.

I also noted the clever use of banana plant leaves by this fellow. Banana and plantain plant leaves are used to wrap "pasteles", a type of plantain starch meal flavored with chunks of pork, garbanzo beans (chick peas), capers and an olive here and there. Eating off the plantain leaf is quite enjoyable.

Back to fermentation of bananas for wine in the you posted, I was surprised to not see flies trying to get to the bananas prior to them being heated. In the tropics, flies are ubiquitous, as you know. The bamboo forest area in the video is apparently favored in not having pesky flies around.

Down in Puerto Rico they make a kind of moonshine ("pitorro") from fruit. However, they are not limited by one type of fruit. They will throw grapes, pieces of oranges (skin included!), bananas and even guavas (as long as the fruit has a reasonable amount of fructose in it, it is fermentally elgible) in a container for making the Puerto Rican verson of white lightinin'. Their methods are not primitive like in the video. They use distillation columns and such to get their product.

At any rate, thank you for posting something that contributes to our knowledge base.



Posted by: AGelbert
« on: December 24, 2017, 02:27:03 pm »

Agelbert NOTE: I found the info in this article very valuable. It is rock solid and backed up with the latest studies. Boosting mitochondrial function is exactly what the ketogenic diet does. Please read the whole thing and watch the video. It will do you good.

What You Really Need to Know About Heart Disease and Its Treatment 
December 24, 2017

Story at-a-glance

֍ Recent research shows stents do not improve angina, thereby negating the sole remaining medical indication for angioplasty or the placement of a stent to unblock a blocked artery

֍ Earlier research showed angioplasty does not reduce mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction or hospitalization rates for acute coronary syndrome

֍ Coronary artery disease is not a disease per se. It’s a symptom of “a diffuse systemic disease,” caused primarily by poor diet, inactivity, insulin resistance and stress

֍ The largest study done on heart attack incidence revealed only 41 percent of people who have a heart attack actually have a blocked artery. Of those, 50 percent of the blockages occurred after the heart attack. This means at least 80 percent of heart attacks are not associated with blocked arteries at all

֍ Three primary causes of heart attacks are decreased parasympathetic tone followed by sympathetic nervous system activation, lack of microcirculation and lactic acid buildup in the heart muscle


SNIPPPET 1:

High Cholesterol Does Not Cause Heart Attacks

As noted by Cowan, many cardiologists would probably answer that question saying the underlying problem is high cholesterol. Alas, the evidence does not support this position either. “I actually looked up four papers, [one] in JAMA, three in The Lancet, showing that life expectancy tends to increase as cholesterol goes up, and that there is no relationship between high cholesterol and death,” Cowan says.


SNIPPET 2:

The Role of Mitochondria in Heart Attacks

Another area of concern is your mitochondria. Unfortunately, this is an area that conventional cardiology is still largely unfamiliar with. In essence, angina is a symptom of poor mitochondrial function, causing a buildup of lactic acid that triggers cramps and pain. When this pain and cramping occurs in your heart, it’s called angina. The lactic acid buildup also restricts blood flow and makes the tissue more toxic.

When a cramp occurs in your leg, you stop moving it, which allows some of the lactic acid to drain off. But your heart cannot stop, so the glycolytic fermentation continues, and the lactic acid continues to build up, eventually interfering with the ability of calcium to get into the muscle. This in turn renders the muscle — in this case your heart — unable to contract, which is exactly what you see on a stress echo or a nuclear thallium scan.

“You see a dyskinetic or an akinetic muscle, which means it doesn't move, because the calcium can't get into the cells because the tissue has become too acidic,” Cowan explains. “Eventually, the acidosis continues, and that becomes the cause of necrosis of the tissue, which is what we call a heart attack …

By the way … [the] dyskinetic area … the part of the heart that's not moving, creates pressure … in the artery embedded in that part of the heart, which causes clots to break off. That explains why you get clots forming after the heart attack, not before. This lactic acidosis buildup is one of the key events, without which you won't have angina, and you won't have the progression to necrosis.

Those are the three [primary causes of heart attacks]: The autonomic nervous system, the microcirculation and lactic acid buildup. Luckily, there are safe, nontoxic, effective ways to address each of those, either individually or together.


Detailed article;

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/12/24/stents-heart-disease-treatment.aspx

Very interesting stuff, AG. I have to read more about this. It all makes sense to me.


Short heart with stenosis film. It's VERY informative!


SNIPPET:

The Riddle’s Solution

A blood vessel that is blocked to a large extent will obstruct the flood flow. A slowly closing narrowing will allow less and less blood to pass. This is known as “critical stenosis”, but in fact, this is not as critical as conventional medicine claims.  Heart seizure and heart attacks are by no means an inevitable result. Why is this? The solution to the riddle is that the three coronary arteries are not isolated from one-another; they are not “end arteries” that are not connected with one another, but part of an extensive network of blood vessels that exist in all parts of the heart muscle. Furthermore, the body is capable of helping itself should there be a blockage of the blood flow or in the oxygen supply and it is able to extend this network in a substantial way.

Detailed article:

http://heartattacknew.com/faq/how-dangerous-are-my-blocked-coronary-arteries/the-riddles-solution/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: December 24, 2017, 12:41:01 pm »

Agelbert NOTE: I found the info in this article very valuable. It is rock solid and backed up with the latest studies. Boosting mitochondrial function is exactly what the ketogenic diet does. Please read the whole thing and watch the video. It will do you good.

What You Really Need to Know About Heart Disease and Its Treatment 
December 24, 2017

Story at-a-glance

֍ Recent research shows stents do not improve angina, thereby negating the sole remaining medical indication for angioplasty or the placement of a stent to unblock a blocked artery

֍ Earlier research showed angioplasty does not reduce mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction or hospitalization rates for acute coronary syndrome

֍ Coronary artery disease is not a disease per se. It’s a symptom of “a diffuse systemic disease,” caused primarily by poor diet, inactivity, insulin resistance and stress

֍ The largest study done on heart attack incidence revealed only 41 percent of people who have a heart attack actually have a blocked artery. Of those, 50 percent of the blockages occurred after the heart attack. This means at least 80 percent of heart attacks are not associated with blocked arteries at all

֍ Three primary causes of heart attacks are decreased parasympathetic tone followed by sympathetic nervous system activation, lack of microcirculation and lactic acid buildup in the heart muscle


SNIPPPET 1:

High Cholesterol Does Not Cause Heart Attacks

As noted by Cowan, many cardiologists would probably answer that question saying the underlying problem is high cholesterol. Alas, the evidence does not support this position either. “I actually looked up four papers, [one] in JAMA, three in The Lancet, showing that life expectancy tends to increase as cholesterol goes up, and that there is no relationship between high cholesterol and death,” Cowan says.


SNIPPET 2:

The Role of Mitochondria in Heart Attacks

Another area of concern is your mitochondria. Unfortunately, this is an area that conventional cardiology is still largely unfamiliar with. In essence, angina is a symptom of poor mitochondrial function, causing a buildup of lactic acid that triggers cramps and pain. When this pain and cramping occurs in your heart, it’s called angina. The lactic acid buildup also restricts blood flow and makes the tissue more toxic.

When a cramp occurs in your leg, you stop moving it, which allows some of the lactic acid to drain off. But your heart cannot stop, so the glycolytic fermentation continues, and the lactic acid continues to build up, eventually interfering with the ability of calcium to get into the muscle. This in turn renders the muscle — in this case your heart — unable to contract, which is exactly what you see on a stress echo or a nuclear thallium scan.

“You see a dyskinetic or an akinetic muscle, which means it doesn't move, because the calcium can't get into the cells because the tissue has become too acidic,” Cowan explains. “Eventually, the acidosis continues, and that becomes the cause of necrosis of the tissue, which is what we call a heart attack …

By the way … [the] dyskinetic area … the part of the heart that's not moving, creates pressure … in the artery embedded in that part of the heart, which causes clots to break off. That explains why you get clots forming after the heart attack, not before. This lactic acidosis buildup is one of the key events, without which you won't have angina, and you won't have the progression to necrosis.

Those are the three [primary causes of heart attacks]: The autonomic nervous system, the microcirculation and lactic acid buildup. Luckily, there are safe, nontoxic, effective ways to address each of those, either individually or together.




Detailed article;

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/12/24/stents-heart-disease-treatment.aspx
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: December 22, 2017, 12:09:56 pm »

What thistle is purple in color, part of the sunflower family, and is eaten as a vegetable? ???
Purple of Romagna Artichoke: Italian heirloom favored by chefs for its tenderness and unique nutty taste

Agelbert NOTE: The creator's fibonacci footprint can be clearly seen in the artichoke. 

How to Grow Artichokes

SNIPPET:

Interesting Facts About Artichokes

Native to the Mediterranean region, artichokes (Cynara scolymus) became scarce with the fall of the Roman Empire. After making a comeback in Italy in the 1500s, artichokes were introduced to the Americas by French and Spanish gardeners. California is the biggest producer of artichokes in the U.S. Other interesting facts about artichokes are:1

Although commonly referred to as a vegetable, artichokes are actually a thistle that is part of the sunflower family

Artichokes can be grown as either a perennial or an annual; perennial artichoke plants last up to five years

When you let their buds open and flower, artichokes produce striking bluish-purple flowers that attract pollinators like bees and butterflies

Types of Artichokes
Artichokes come in several varieties, including:2,3

Big Heart: Thornless, slightly purple variety that can handle some heat

Green Globe: Heavy-bearing perennial that does best in ideal growing conditions, including California, where it is grown commercially

Imperial Star: Adaptable and easy to grow from seed as an annual; recommended for gardeners in cooler climates (U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant Hardiness Zone 6 or lower4)

Purple of Romagna: Italian heirloom favored by chefs for its tenderness and unique nutty taste

Violetto: Oval-shaped Italian heirloom known for producing dozens of small side shoots

Full article:

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/12/22/growing-artichokes.aspx
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: May 18, 2017, 06:04:25 pm »


How Did Modern Tomatoes Lose Their Flavor?

Agelbert NOTE: The short answer is GREED!  >:(

It’s not just your imagination. Today’s tomatoes simply don’t taste the way they used to, and now science has told us why. Researchers working on a study published in the journal Science performed exhaustive taste tests of 100 tomato varieties and sequenced the genomes of nearly 400 varieties. They were able to identify 23 volatile compounds that give a tomato its flavor. Unfortunately, many of those compounds, plus essential sugars, are missing from today’s supermarket tomatoes -- they were inadvertently     lost when the industry sought to maximize yields and improve tomatoes' resistance to pests and disease.

Better tomatoes on the way?


• “The flavor got lost because people didn’t know what the molecular and genetic bases were, so they couldn’t apply them,” said study author Antonio Granell.

• Major seed producers are expected to use this new genetic information to make seeds that will grow into new, tastier tomatoes -- possibly within four years.

• Harry Klee, professor of horticultural sciences at the University of Florida, also accused supermarkets of ruining the taste of tomatoes by chilling them at low temperatures, which adversely affects the flavor.

http://www.wisegeek.com/how-did-modern-tomatoes-lose-their-flavor.htm




Posted by: AGelbert
« on: May 07, 2017, 07:05:06 pm »


Is Aluminum Foil Safe to Use in Cooking?  ???   


By Helen West

Aluminum foil is a common household product that's often used in cooking.

Some claim that using aluminum foil in cooking can cause aluminum to seep into your food and put your health at risk.

However, others say it's entirely safe to use.

This article explores the risks associated with using aluminum foil and determines whether or not it is acceptable for everyday use.

 

http://www.ecowatch.com/aluminum-foil-cooking-2394046382.html
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: May 03, 2017, 06:59:32 pm »

The Cholesterol Myth Has Been Busted — Yet Again

May 03, 2017 • 96,863 views

cholesterol myth

Story at-a-glance
-

A 40-year-old previously unpublished trial shows that while replacing saturated fat with vegetable oil lowered total cholesterol by 14 percent, for every 30 point drop in total cholesterol there was a 22 percent increased chance of death

Many other trials have also found that replacing saturated fats with vegetable oils increase mortality risk from all causes, including coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease

Processed vegetable oils contribute to devastating attacks to your health and attacks your brain in several ways, thereby contributing to and worsening neurologic disorders

SNIPPET:

By Dr. Mercola

For the past four decades, the U.S. government has warned that eating cholesterol-rich foods such as eggs would raise your LDL cholesterol (inappropriately referred to as "bad" cholesterol) and promote heart disease.

Alas, decades' worth of research utterly failed to demonstrate this correlation, and the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans1,2,3,4,5 finally addressed this scientific shortcoming, announcing "cholesterol is not considered a nutrient of concern for overconsumption."6

This is good news, since dietary cholesterol plays an important role in brain health and memory formation, and is indispensable for the building of cells and the production of stress and sex hormones, as well as vitamin D. (When sunlight strikes your bare skin, the cholesterol in your skin is converted into vitamin D.)

Unfortunately, the dietary guidelines still cling to outdated misinformation about saturated fat, wrongly accusing it of raising LDL and contributing to heart disease. Here, science has shown that saturated fat only raises the safe, fluffy LDL particles. It also increases HDL, which is beneficial for your heart.

The guidelines became and are still confusing because the basic premise was wrong. Dietary fat is indeed associated with heart disease, but it's the processed vegetable oils, which are loaded with trans fats and oxidized omega-6 fats, that are the problem , not saturated fats.

The introduction of industrialized, highly processed and frequently heated omega-6 vegetable oils distorted the vitally important omega 6-to-3 ratio, causing metabolic catastrophes. The problem was further exacerbated by replacing saturated fat with refined carbohydrates, which were incorrectly viewed as a healthier option, thanks to misinformation created and spread by the sugar industry.

Full must read article:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/05/03/cholesterol-myth-busted.aspx


Posted by: AGelbert
« on: February 20, 2017, 04:51:38 pm »


How Eating the Rainbow Can Help Protect Against Cancer

SNIPPET:

Start by replacing your processed or animal-based meals with foods from each color segment below and check out their benefits on their ability to fight cancer.

Green:


Fruits and vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, kale, turnips, cauliflower, asparagus, collards, mustard greens, green apples, fresh herbs, zucchini, turnip greens, spinach, and Brussels sprouts contain either antioxidants known as flavones and/or indoles which have been directly linked to the prevention against cancer. They also contain high amounts of chlorophyll that prevents acidity in the body. Soybeans, green peas, and green beans are also high in antioxidants that support immune health even further.

Yellow/Orange:

Fruits and vegetables such as pumpkin, squash, peaches, yellow and orange bell peppers, lemons, cantaloupe, sweet potatoes, grapefruit, papaya, and apricots all contain especially high levels of Vitamin C for immune health, along with beta-carotene, a nutrient derived from the carotenoids found in these plants that give them their colorful hue. Studies have shown that women who eat carotenoid-rich vegetables reduce their breast cancer risk by up to 19 percent!

Red/Orange:

Fruits like watermelon, tomatoes, red peppers, papaya, grapefruit, and guava, all contain lycopene that also reduces the risks for prostate cancer and heart disease. Lycopene has also been shown to lower high cholesterol that can lead to increased fat cells that stimulate cancer cell growth.

Red/Blue/Purple:

Blue and purple foods like berries, figs, beets, pomegranates, grapes, raisins, and plums, all contain high levels of antioxidants known as anthocyanins or polyphenols that protect the heart and prevent heart disease. Their intake has also been linked to the prevention of certain types of cancers, according to The American Cancer Society.

White/Tan/Brown:

If you think white vegetables don’t count, think again! They are rich in antioxidants known as phytochemicals like allicin (garlic and onions), beans and legumes (that contain fiber to reduce cholesterol and obesity), quercetin (onions and apples), selenium (mushrooms), Vitamin C (onions, apples, and parsnips), and a variety of vitamins and minerals that support the immune system (banana flesh, white nectarines, white peaches, cauliflower, artichokes, and potatoes.) Selenium was found to be one of the most prominent minerals for mens’ prostate health while garlic and onions remain as two of the top foods to boost the immune system and fight cancer cell growth.

There are so many ways to add fruits and vegetables to your diet. Here are a few great suggestions:




http://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/how-eating-the-rainbow-can-help-protect-against-cancer/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: February 09, 2017, 10:04:28 pm »

Peas Are the Future of Protein – Here’s Why

Kat Smith   
January 26, 2017   

It’s no secret that we’re kind of obsessed with protein. Studies have shown that the average person in a developed country consumes 103 grams of protein a day — more than double the recommended daily intake, most of which come from animal protein. Unfortunately, our appetite for animal-based protein has a devastating impact on the planet. Luckily, as more people come to recognize how meat and dairy can negatively impact not only the health of the planet but their own as well, the demand for clean, plant-based protein is on the rise. The plant-based protein market is estimated to reach a value of $5.2 billion by 2020 and plant-based meat alternatives could make up one-third of the entire market by 2050. In keeping with this trend, one company just took a huge step in leading the change.

Last week Roquette, a French, family-owned company, announced it will build the world’s largest pea processing plant in Manitoba, Canada. Roquette has been around since the 1930s and currently specializes in producing sustainable products in the pharmaceutical, health, food, nutrition, feed, pet food spaces. This new plant will be dedicated to making pea protein, a high-protein, low-fat, and allergen-friendly alternative to animal protein. According to Roquette chair Edward Roquette, “it is the largest global investment dedicated to pea protein to date. And it constitutes a key pillar of our strategy in plant protein in general and in pea protein in particular.”

It’s not just Roquette that’s responding to the demand for plant-based protein — more companies than ever have embraced pea protein. Last year, Ripple Foods launched a line of plant-based milks made from pea protein while the maker’s of Muscle Milk released Evolve, a plant-based protein shake made from pea protein. 2016 also saw the launch of the Beyond Burger, a pea protein-based burger that contains 20 grams of protein per patty. Now, Roquette’s processing plant will be a fantastic step forward into the future of protein, making pea protein more easily available than ever. Construction of the world’s largest pea processing plant is set to begin later this year.

There’s no turning back from here. As the world’s population continues to grow and more developing nations start to demand more meat and dairy, we need to realize that animal protein cannot sustain a world of meat eaters. As Nil Zacharias, Co-Founder of One Green Planet, has said, “advancements in plant-protein are the kind of technological innovations the world desperately needs. In fact, it may be one of the only real shots we have to make our future on this planet possible.” If we hope to feed the growing demand for protein, we need to move ahead into the future of food with more plant-based options like pea protein.   



http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/peas-are-the-future-of-protein/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: January 28, 2017, 07:48:15 pm »

Where Do We Get Our Biological Energy?
Water Supports Health in Ways You May Never Have Suspected

January 28, 2017 | 176,023 views

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/01/28/ez-water.aspx
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: December 17, 2016, 03:45:15 pm »


Is Your Olive Oil Fake?         ???


December 17, 2016 | 113,852 views | Available in Español Disponible en Español

Story at-a-glance

The popularity of the Mediterranean diet has made olive oil a $16 billion-a-year industry. Unfortunately, this popularity has also led to massive fraud and corruption.

Even "extra virgin" olive oil is often diluted with other less expensive oils, including hazelnut, soybean, corn, sunflower, palm, sesame, grape seed and/or walnut.
These added oils will not be listed on the label.  >:(

Tips on how to identify high quality olive oil include buying from specialty retailers that allow you to taste it first. Guidance on what to look for is included. Taste and smell are factors by which you discern authenticity.  8)


Full article with added explanatory videos:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/12/17/fake-olive-oil.aspx

Agelbert NOTE:
Watch out for the term "cold pressed" olive oil on the label. As the article points out. NO olive oil is cold pressed now. ALL olive oil is centrifuged. If you see "cold pressed" on the label, you are being lied to. That might indicate a proclivity to lie about content as well by that company...


Posted by: AGelbert
« on: December 10, 2016, 02:04:02 pm »

But Don’t We Need Protein?

While we do need protein, perhaps we don’t need so much as we might think. The Center for Disease Control and Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine both agree we are getting plenty of protein and that protein deficiency is not a problem in our society, especially in comparison to the cancer problem we have.

The Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) even says that we actually get too much protein, around double of what we really need. They advise using the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) protein formula, which is : 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight for the average adult.

To find out your average individual need, multiply your body weight in pounds by your recommended protein intake in grams.

Are We Eating Too Much Protein? A Scientist Makes the Connection Between Protein and Cancer

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/t-colin-campbell-protein-and-cancer/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: December 05, 2016, 02:59:47 pm »

Medical journal defends article  ;D on questionable science behind US dietary guidelines

SNIPPET:

Quote

“They were happy to condemn the article in general terms, but when I asked them to name just one of the supposed errors in it, not one of them was able to. One admitted he had not read it. Another told me she had signed the letter because the BMJ should not have published an article that was not peer reviewed (it was peer reviewed). Meir Stampfer, a Harvard epidemiologist, asserted that Teicholz’s work is ‘riddled with errors,  ;)’ while declining to discuss them with me.”

It’s difficult to argue with Teicholz’s evidence-based logic that rates of obesity in the U.S. shot upward in 1980, the very year in which dietary guidelines were introduced, and the diabetes epidemic kicked in shortly after. Nor is it acceptable for decisions about influential national nutrition policies to be decided by people who work within the food industry. Teicholz wrote:

“It may be time to ask our authorities to convene an unbiased and balanced panel of scientists to undertake a comprehensive review, in order to ensure that selection of the dietary guidelines committee becomes more transparent, with better disclosure of the conflicts of interest, and that the most rigorous scientific evidence is reliably used to produce the best possible nutrition policy.”

It appears she has won the battle this time round. 

http://www.treehugger.com/health/medical-journal-admits-us-dietary-guidelines-are-based-questionable-science.html

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: November 21, 2016, 01:22:08 pm »

The remarkable history and healing power of honey

Katherine Martinko (@feistyredhair)
Living / Green Food
 November 18, 2016

http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/remarkable-history-and-healing-power-honey.html


Posted by: AGelbert
« on: October 08, 2016, 02:53:02 pm »

 
Although jackfruit is still considered an exotic tropical fruit in the U.S., it is becoming more popular in the vegan and vegetarian circles as a meat substitute. After about one hour of cooking, unripened jackfruit starts to resemble the flavor and mouth-feel of pulled pork.     

What Is Jackfruit Good For? ??? 

 
Botanical name: Artocarpus heterophyllus

Having a distinct musky smell and deliciously sweet taste, jackfruit is a unique tropical fruit that is typically harvested during summer and fall.

It can grow to enormous sizes, measuring between 10 and 60 centimeters in length, 25 to 75 centimeters in diameter, and can weigh between 10 and 100 pounds, making it the largest tree-borne fruit in the world.

Specimens weighing more than 100 pounds have also been recorded.

Jackfruit originated from the rainforests of India’s Western Ghats and spread to other parts of the country, the East Indies and Southeast Asia. It is now planted in central and eastern Africa and has become quite popular in Brazil and Suriname. In Bangladesh, jackfruit is touted as the national fruit and it is considered the second-most important crop after mangoes.

The exotic jackfruit is green when unripe, and then turns light brown and spreads a strong fragrant smell once it is ripe. Like durian, jackfruit is round or oblong-shaped, and has an outer surface that is covered with blunt thorn-like projections that soften as the fruit ripens. Inside each fruit are hundreds of small, succulent yellow lobes. Most jackfruit trees can bear as many as 250 large fruits every season. The tree is used as timber as well.

Although jackfruit is still considered an exotic tropical fruit in the U.S., it is becoming more popular in the vegan and vegetarian circles as a meat substitute. After about one hour of cooking, unripened jackfruit starts to resemble the flavor and mouth-feel of pulled pork.

Health Benefits of Jackfruit 

Jackfruit is a nutritional bonanza: it is rich in vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber, which makes it a good natural laxative. It can help improve digestion, as adequate fiber can be an effective natural remedy to prevent constipation, and it can also benefit those who want to lose or maintain their weight by giving a feeling of fullness.

Jackfruit is also known to contain significant amounts of vitamin A and flavonoid pigments (carotene-ß, xanthin, lutein and cryptoxanthin-ß), offering antioxidant and vision support. As it is low in calories and sodium and does not contain cholesterol or unhealthy fats, its luscious fruit lobes make a healthy, appetizing treat you can relish.

The enigmatic fruit is rich in B-complex vitamins, containing niacin, pyridoxine, riboflavin and folic acid. It is a viable source of minerals, such as iron, magnesium, potassium and manganese as well.

As a good source of vitamin C — also a powerful antioxidant — jackfruit offers about 23 percent of the recommended daily allowance (RDA), which makes it useful in helping fight off infectious agents while scavenging harmful free radicals in the body.

However, consume jackfruit in moderation because it contains fructose, which may be harmful to your health in excessive amounts.

Jackfruit Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 3.5 ounces (100 grams),raw or frozen (at article link)


Studies on Jackfruit



A study published in the journal Plant Foods for Human Nutrition indicated that the pulp of jackfruit is a natural source of antioxidants that protect cells from free radical damage. This means the fruit can help slow down skin aging and can even assist in repairing damaged molecules, like DNA.1

Jackfruit contains lignans and saponins, which are beneficial phytonutrients that have been shown to offer anti-cancer properties. Lignans have been found to help block the effects of the hormone estrogen, which may decrease risk of hormone-associated cancers (uterine, ovarian, breast and prostate). Saponins, on the other hand, are known to optimize immune function and reduce risk of heart disease.2

Another study published in The Ceylon Medical Journal categorized jackfruit as a low-glycemic index fruit, which is attributed to its dietary fiber content.3 Consumption of unripe jackfruit can even be used to fight high blood sugar level, according to a Sydney University Glycemic Index Research Service study.4

 
Ripe Jackfruit

Researchers also regard jackfruit as a “miracle” food crop that could be a replacement for staple crops that are under threat from climate change. It is very easy to grow and can survive high temperatures, pests and diseases, and is even drought-resistant.

According to Shyamala Reddy, a biotechnology researcher at the University of Agriculture Sciences in Bangalore, India, the jackfruit is rich in calories and nutrients and if a person eats 10 to 12 bulbs, he or she won’t need food for another 12 hours. For these reasons, this fruit could be utilized to help save millions of people from hunger.5


Jackfruit Healthy Recipe: Easy Jackfruit Curry
healthy jackfruit recipe

Ingredients: Jicama Slaw
500 grams fresh jackfruit
2 medium tomatoes pureed
1 tsp. virgin coconut oil
½ tsp. cumin seeds
½ tsp. mustard seeds
½ tsp. nigella seeds
2 bay leaves
2 dried red chili peppers
1 small onion (chopped)
1 inch ginger (chopped)
1 tsp. coriander powder
½ tsp. turmeric
¼ tsp. black pepper
½ to ¾ tsp. Himalayan salt
1 to 1.5 cups of water

Procedure:

1.Heat extra virgin coconut oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the cumin, nigella and mustard seeds and let them sizzle for about a minute. Add the bay leaves and red chili peppers, and then cook for several seconds. Add the onion, garlic and ginger, and just a pinch of Himalayan salt. Cook until translucent (five to six minutes) and remember to mix occasionally.

2.Add the turmeric, coriander and black pepper, mixing well. Stir while adding the pureed tomato, jackfruit and the rest of the salt. Cover and cook for approximately 15 minutes.

3.Uncover and cook for another few minutes to make the tomato puree thicker. The jackfruit can also be shredded.

4.Add the water and then cover and cook for 15 minutes. Taste and adjust the flavor accordingly, then reduce the heat to medium low and cook for an extra 10 minutes or longer, until your desired consistency is achieved. Garnish with cilantro and serve.


Jackfruit Fun Facts

Jackfruit emits a sweet yet putrid stench that has been described as a combination of overripe bananas, onions  :P, pineapple and passion fruit. Like durian *, the giant fruit is banned in airports and plane cabins, but it isn’t prohibited as cargo.


 
*   durian



Summary

Jackfruit certainly brings something new to the table. Aside from its distinctive flavor, this interesting fruit also has an impressive nutritional profile that includes vitamins, antioxidants and phytonutrients. Researchers believe this tropical fruit could help solve the food shortage problem because it is high in calories, rich in fiber, virtually has no unhealthy fat and can even be grown very easily.

http://foodfacts.mercola.com/jackfruit.html

 

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