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Topic Summary

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: October 15, 2019, 09:48:57 pm »



There is a rapid rise in demand for modern wind propulsion in shipping, Norsepower Rotor Sails. 👍

Wärtsilä, Norsepower Team Up on Rotor Sails 🌞

By Mike Schuler on Oct 14, 2019 03:58 pm

Finnish technology group Wärtsilä has teamed up with Finnish rotor sail propulsion specialist Norsepower to pursue energy-saving rotor sail projects in the commercial maritime industry. The service cooperation agreement expands the global wind propulsion service network by allow Norsepower to order service work from Wärtsilä, while Wärtsilä can pursue and sell Norsepower Rotor Sail systems with […]  Read full story...
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: September 20, 2019, 09:13:09 pm »



World’s Largest Offshore Wind Turbines Coming to U.S. Waters

An illustration of GE’s Haliade-X 12 MW wind turbine. Image courtesy GE

By gCaptain on Sep 19, 2019 11:33 am

Haliade-X 12 MW wind turbinesBy Christopher Martin (Bloomberg) –The tallest, most powerful wind turbines ever made are coming to U.S. waters care of General Electric Co. Denmark-based Orsted A/S plans to use 12-megawatt turbines made by GE for projects off the coast of Maryland and New Jersey, according to a statement from the companies Thursday. The 853-foot (260-meter) turbines […]  Read full story...
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: September 14, 2019, 07:08:41 pm »




SUNY Maritime College To Host Wind Energy Conference In New York City

By John Konrad on Sep 13, 2019 09:16 am

Wind TurbineThe State University of New York Maritime College and the Maritime Industry Museum at Fort Schuyler, proudly announce the Ocean Wind Energy Conference in New York City on Thursday, September 26, 2019. This conference comes just months after New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo executed the United States’ largest offshore wind agreement, announcing the winning […]  Read full story...
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 26, 2019, 04:41:42 pm »

CleanTechnica
Support CleanTechnica’s work via donations on Patreon or PayPal!

Or just go buy a cool t-shirt, cup, baby outfit, bag, or hoodie.[/url


2018 Wind Technologies Market Report (screenshot via US DOE Wind power in the USA).

August 24th, 2019 by Tina Casey

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 24, 2019, 12:19:23 am »



August 22, 2019 by Mike Schuler

Norway Approves Funding for Floating Wind Farm at North Sea 🦕 Oil Fields

Illustration courtesy Equinor

Norwegian government-run Enova has approved funding of up to NOK 2.3 billion (US$256 million) to support a project that would develop the world’s first floating offshore wind farm to power offshore oil and gas installations in the northern North Sea.

The Hywind Tampen project proposes supplying electricity from a floating offshore wind farm to the Equinor-operated Gullfaks and Snorre fields. By tapping renewable energy resources, it is estimated that CO2 emissions would be reduced by more than 200,000 tonnes per year, equivalent to emissions from 100,000 private cars.

The offshore wind farm will consist of 11 floating wind turbines with a total capacity of 88 MW, enough to meet around 35% of the annual electricity needed fo the five existing oil and gas platforms at the Gullfaks and Snorre fields. During periods of high winds, the percentage could even be much higher.

Illustration courtesy Equinor

“The support that the licences have received for the Hywind Tampen project demonstrates the will of Norwegian authorities to invest in and develop floating offshore wind farms and renewable energy supplies. With this support we have taken an important step forward in realising the project. Now it is up to the licences to further mature the project towards a final investment decision this autumn,” says Pål Eitrheim, executive vice president for New Energy Solutions in Equinor.

Earlier, the Business Sector’s NOx Fund decided to support the Hywind Tampen project by an investment grant of up to NOK 566 million.

“The Hywind Tampen project will contribute to further developing floating offshore wind technology and reducing the costs of future floating offshore wind farms, offering new industrial opportunities for Norway, the licences and Norwegian supplier industry in a growing global offshore wind market,” says Olav-Bernt Haga, project director for Hywind Tampen.

The seven partners in the Snorre and Gullfaks licences will potentially to make an investment decision for the Hywind Tampen project this fall.

Parnters in the Gullfaks license include Equinor Energy AS (51%), Petoro AS (30%), and OMV (Norge) AS (19%). Snorre license partners include Equinor Energy AS (33.3%), Petoro AS (30%), ExxonMobil Exploration and Production Norway AS (17.5%), Idemitsu Petroleum Norge AS (9.6%), DEA Norge AS (8.6%), and Vår Energi AS (1.1%)
https://gcaptain.com/norway-approves-funding-for-floating-wind-farm-at-north-sea-oil-fields/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 13, 2019, 06:12:08 pm »



August 12, 2019 by Reuters

Photo: Teun van den Dries / Shutterstock

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: August 01, 2019, 01:36:07 pm »

Painted Canvas Over Plywood, Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

By Drewrt in Workshop > Energy


Full 'How To' Instructions: 🧐🌞

https://www.instructables.com/id/Painted-Canvas-Over-Plywood-Vertical-Axis-Wind-Tur/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 19, 2019, 06:02:14 pm »



New York Selects Winning Bidders in Nation’s Largest Offshore Wind Agreement

By gCaptain on Jul 18, 2019 03:41 pm


New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has executed the United States’ largest offshore wind agreement, announcing the winners bidders in New York’s first large-scale comprehensive offshore wind solicitation that will generate a combined 1,700 Megawatts of renewable for the state. Winning bidders were Equinor US Holdings, Inc. and Bay State Wind LLC, a joint venture […]  Read full story...
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 09, 2019, 12:13:36 pm »

Quote
Jens Stubbe • 17 hours ago
CIP is already building the first real offshore project in USA and is growing fast with also the largest HVDC project in USA this millennium.

Offshore is in many ways the only way to save the globe and grew 31% last year while dropping cost 24% per produced kWh. 👍👍👍

This is just an extension of a long standing trend with 29% average annual growth since 2012 and 20% annual cost drop.

The future looks explosive as the two majors in the +8MW segment will be joined by GE Haliade 12MW and 14MW with astonishing capacity factors and yet again better than the square cube rule performance.

The latest market report was from GWEC and their first attempt ever on a prognosis for offshore wind. Even though GWEC lifted the 2030 target by BNEF a few month prior by 52% they still envision this strange collapse that also BNEF came up with.

We will know more when the results from a few ongoing zero subsidy projects roll in and also when the bids for the first offshore in India rolls in.

Jan Veselý > Jens Stubbe • 7 hours ago
Hi Jens,
do you have some info about real world tests of the new breed of wind turbines where they reached 60+% capacity factors? Even on test sites. Thanks.

Jens Stubbe > Jan Veselý • 5 hours ago
The GE Haliade 12MW and Siemens Gamesa 10MW are still in preparation.
https://www.4coffshore.com/news/ge-preps-for-12mw-test-turbine-nid12512.html

Interestingly the development costs disclosed where only slightly higher than for the MHI Vestas 8MW so also on development cost the industry are setting new standards.
https://www.offshorewind.biz/2018/05/18/siemens-gamesa-to-test-10mw-systems-in-spain/...

John > Jens Stubbe • 17 hours ago
I still can't believe Hornsea One is already halfway built. That is going up fast.

Jens Stubbe > John • 11 hours ago
Since the first project with MHI Vestas turbines went up three years ago the average construction time has been cut to just a third and this speeding up of operations is one of the cost drivers that will definitively continue unabated.

Especially the likely shift to floating fundaments will mean that turbines will be completed in the harbour and towed to position.

The same goes with the shift to PTX onboard where you do not use HVDC but simpler and cheaper pipelines for the PTX

Associated Article: 

July 8th, 2019 by Joshua S Hill

Star of the South location. Map courtesy Star of the South Wind Farm Pty Ltd.

 


Posted by: AGelbert
« on: June 26, 2019, 06:10:22 pm »

CleanTechnica
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June 26th, 2019 by Joshua S Hill 
Image Credit: RenewableUK


Posted by: AGelbert
« on: April 30, 2019, 12:39:11 pm »

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April 30th, 2019 by Joshua S Hill


 
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: April 16, 2019, 01:07:21 pm »



16 Apr 2019, 14:41 Benjamin Wehrmann #Renewables    #Wind    #Government

Merkel opens Baltic’s largest offshore wind farm as industry warns against slow-down

 
Merkel (back row in centre with red blazer) inaugurates the wind farm together with a group of local children. Photo: E.ON.

The opening of a new offshore wind farm in the Baltic Sea gives Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel an opportunity to show her climate policy credentials and welcome the German-Norwegian project as a milestone for the energy transition and international cooperation.

But the opening comes at a time when the chancellor faces increasing pressure at home to come up with policies that help bring down Germany's emissions in line with its international climate action obligations. Moreover, the national wind power industry increasingly warns that local resistance and restrictive regulation could well mean that the country's renewables expansion targets are difficult to meet.

Ten years after Germany opened its first offshore wind farm in the North Sea, Chancellor Angela Merkel has opened the country’s newest offshore power station, demonstrating that early doubts about the technology were largely unfounded. In her weekly video podcast, Merkel said she was opening the project to make clear “how important the expansion of renewable energy is for us.”

The Arkona wind farm, named after a nearby cape on the island of Rügen, where Merkel’s constituency is located, was built over the course of three years and is the Baltic’s largest. With a capacity of 385 megawatts, the park built 35 kilometres off the coast could theoretically supply about 400,000 German homes with electricity, according to Equinor. It is operated by energy companies E.ON from Germany and Equinor from Norway, which is why Merkel was accompanied by Norwegian energy minister Kjell-Borge Freiberg at the ceremony.

Merkel said the Arkona wind farm was setting a new standard for the transformation of Germany’s energy system in the Energiewende. “But only changing the way we produce energy won’t be enough,” the Chancellor said, adding that changes in the heating and in the transport sector were also forthcoming.

The wind farm, operated by the utility E.ON, comes at a time when the German government is under pressure to formulate a clear climate policy. German students have been staging weekly “Fridays for Future” school strikes, demanding more action on climate change, and some lawmakers have worried aloud that many future voters could turn their back on the governing parties if Merkel’s government does not act.

At the same time, lawmakers run the risk of alienating voters in mining regions as they strive to implement the seminal agreement from the nation’s coal exit commission, announced this winter. The commission recommended ending coal-fired power generation by 2038 at the latest, and some voters fear their jobs are being sacrificed to fulfill national climate targets.

But there are also signs of progress. Merkel’s inauguration of the wind farm comes just days after Germany’s environmental agency, UBA, announced that the country’s carbon emissions had declined substantially for the first time in years. 👍

It was the steepest emissions drop in ten years - and it was made possible, in part, by the growth of offshore wind. “There used to be a great deal of scepticism at the beginning of the offshore era,” Jörg Buddenberg of energy company EWE told news agency dpa in an article carried by newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung. Buddenberg said early critics argued that the previously unexplored technology would never work. While offshore wind had to surmount several technical difficulties in its initial stage, Germany now has more than 1,300 operational turbines at sea with a combined capacity of 6.4 gigawatts (GW). Offshore wind farms produced nearly 19 Terawatt hours (TWh) of electricity in 2018. That's about twice the average output per installation of their onshore counterparts, adding up to nearly one fifth of the country’s total wind power generation.

But the wind industry says the technology’s potential still is not fully appreciated, calling for the government to raise the country’s offshore wind expansion target from 15 to 20 GW by 2030 and to 30 GW by 2035. Offshore wind lobby group BWO argues that without the higher targets the government goal of 65 percent renewable power consumption cannot be achieved. According to research institute Fraunhofer IWES, Germany could potentially install up to 54 GW of offshore wind power and generate nearly 260 TWh of electricity at sea. An expansion of that magnitude has drawn skepticism from environmentalists, who worry that turning large swathes of Germany’s territorial waters into industrial zones could have grave consequences for already strained ecosystems in the North and Baltic Seas.

The wind lobby’s calls for greater expansion have been supported by a substantial decrease in the cost of offshore wind power, with the average generation costs per kilowatt hour (kWh) dropping from over 14 cents in 2013 to a little more than 8 cents in 2018. Several zero-support bids in Germany’s first offshore wind power auctions have further supported the conviction that the technology has vast potential for a cost-efficient energy transition.

The new Arkona farm could power up to 400,000 average homes in Germany. Photo - Equinor

But wind power companies and lobby group BWE have complained about the cost pressure created by the auction scheme. In what had been one of the biggest setbacks for a German wind company, turbine producer Senvion filed for insolvency in April. While the company’s demise was seen as partly due to managerial mistakes, news agency Reuters noted that cost pressure meant it could no longer compete with companies that have greater pricing power, such as German-Spanish Siemens Gamesa or Danish Vestas. Newspaper WirtschaftsWoche said despite growing wind power capacity around the world, small and middle-sized companies like Senvion or its fellow German turbinemakers Nordex and Enercon could increasingly face insurmountable difficulties – especially with Chinese companies hoping to make an entry into the German wind power market similar to China's takeover in the solar industry.

Wind power lobby group BWE says international market pressure is not the only obstacle, arguing thatnational regulation also poses an increasing challenge. Rising local resistance to new onshore projects is compounded by uncertainties following the switch to Germany’s renewables auction system. That means that reaching the climate and renewables expansion targets becomes increasingly uncertain, BWE says. In Bavaria, the BWE argues, a strict implementation of the so-called 10H-rule, which stipulates that turbines have to maintain a distance of ten times their height to the next residential area, means that the expansion in the state “has been throttled down to almost zero.”

The 10H-rule established in Bavaria has also been mulled by other state governments in a bid to ease resistance against wind power projects. Germany's environment agency UBA warned that a limit of only 1,000 metres, which would not even be enough for many of the new powerful but also very high turbines,  would reduce the land available for turbines by 20 to 50 percent. This would render a sufficient expansion of wind power to meet Germany's climate targets “almost impossible”.

All texts created by the Clean Energy Wire are available under a “Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence (CC BY 4.0)” . They can be copied, shared and made publicly accessible by users so long as they give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made.

https://www.cleanenergywire.org/news/merkel-opens-baltics-largest-offshore-wind-farm-industry-warns-against-slow-down


Posted by: AGelbert
« on: April 15, 2019, 03:15:44 pm »

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: March 20, 2019, 09:16:56 pm »

EcoWatch

By Olivia Rosane Mar. 19, 2019 02:17PM EST


Study: Americans Are Happy to Let Wind Turbines Be Their Neighbors

Americans like wind turbines as neighbors, at least when compared with the alternatives.

That's the conclusion of a University of Delaware (UD) study published in Nature Energy Monday. UD Prof. Jeremy Firestone and undergraduate Hannah Kirk looked at data from a survey of people who lived within eight kilometers (approximately five miles) of a wind turbine. They found that around 90 percent of them preferred the wind turbine over an alternative plant located at a similar distance, whether it was fueled by coal, natural gas or uranium.

Firestone said the study offered a more realistic gauge of American's energy preferences.

"We've looked at social acceptance of wind projects examining factors such as effect of landscape change, sound and place attachment. In those studies, the ultimate question is whether a community member supports or opposes a local project — that is, wind power or nothing," he explained in a UD press release. "But that's not the societal choice, which is instead, among wind power, solar, coal or natural gas. Even when residents might have less than positive attitudes toward a local project, the majority appear to conclude that their local wind power project is better than the alternatives."

1. Here are some of the key findings, reported by the press release and additional comments by Firestone in Behavioral and Social Sciences at Nature:

2. Of the two-thirds who had a preference between living near a wind turbine or a commercial solar installation, three to one preferred wind.

3. The preference for wind held across states despite economic or geographic differences. For example, 86 percent of people in coal-mining states preferred to live near a wind turbine, while only around eight percent would have preferred to live near a coal plant.


The preference also held whether the state was considered 'Red' (voted Republican for president in 2012 and 2016), 'Purple' (switched between the two years) or 'Blue' (voted Democrat both years.)

"{P} references for wind power are bipartisan, " Kirk said in the press release.

The data set Kirk and Firestone used for their research was collected and made public by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Firestone, who also helped compile the original data, explained in Nature how it was done:

Quote
First, we subdivided the population. For example, the 8 km distance was broken into four groups to ensure that sufficient individuals were included who lived very nearby a wind turbine given their potential greater ability to hear operating wind turbines and to be affected by changes to the landscape. Second, we used three modes to contact individuals to take the survey: telephone, online, and on paper. To account for the complexity and to address the fact that not everyone contacted responds, the sample was weighted to match it to the population based on gender, age and education.

Firestone said that the wide support for wind projects by those who lived near them, even in coal states, was a positive sign for how the public might react to a shift away from fossil fuels.

"This suggests the energy transition that is underway in the United States may be embraced widely," he said in the press release.

https://www.ecowatch.com/wind-turbines-americans-2632137785.html

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: March 06, 2019, 05:04:38 pm »

Agelbert NOTE: Oh the irony; a TANKER  powered partially by (wind) Renewable Energy.  



Norsepower Rotor Sails Issued First-Ever Design Type Approval for Onboard Wind Propulsion

March 5, 2019 by gCaptain

 
Maersk Pelican with Norsepower Rotor Sails installed. Image via Marsk Tankers

Finnish clean technology group Norsepower announced Tuesday that its innovative Rotor Sail Solution has received the first-ever type approval design certificate granted to an auxiliary wind propulsion system onboard a commercial ship.

The type approval from leading ship classification society DNV GL was issued in February 2019 after a design assessment of Norsepower’s 30-meter by 5-meter Rotor Sail, two of which have been installed onboard the Maersk Pelican LR2 tanker.

Norsepower says the landmark certification means that vessels operating its Rotor Sail technology are technically capable of safely navigating “all operational and environmental situations”.

The company’s Rotor Sail Solution is a modernized version of the Flettner rotor; a spinning cylinder that uses the Magnus effect to harness wind power to propel a ship and enhance fuel-saving.

Rotor Sails have already been installed on three vessels and has achieved over 35,000 hours in operation, saving more than 4,500 tonnes of CO2, according to Norsepower. The solution has also been independently verified to reduce fuel consumption by up to 20%.

Commenting on the type approval, Norsepower CEO Tuomas Riski said: “We are very proud to be the first company to have type approval granted to an auxiliary wind propulsion system onboard a commercial ship. Having a type approval design certificate is very important to us. Clearly, it provides shipowners, operators, and charterers with a level of assurance when investing in the Rotor Sail Solution, but in the long term, it removes yet another hurdle to the realization of renewable wind energy propulsion systems at a scale that supports shipping’s transformation to a low carbon transport sector.”

Last month, Norsepower was crowned the winner of the 2018 International Quality Innovation Award in recognition of its Rotor Sail Solution technology’s ability to demonstrate positive environmental contributions.

“To help reduce shipping’s environmental impact we will need many different fuel and technology options, which is why we were very pleased that Norsepower asked us to be part of this innovative wind propulsion project,” said Geir Dugstad, Director of Ship Classification and Technical Director at DNV GL.

https://gcaptain.com/norsepower-rotor-sails-issued-design-type-approval/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: February 20, 2019, 02:21:30 pm »



First Turbine Installed at World’s Largest Offshore Wind Farm
February 19, 2019 by Mike Schuler

Hornsea 1 turbine Photo: Orsted

The first turbine at the soon-to-be world’s biggest offshore wind farm has been installed and is now producing electricity off of England’s coast.

When fully operational, the 1,218-megawatt Hornsea 1 offshore wind farm will be nearly double the size of the current world’s largest offshore wind farm, Walney Extension, and capable of powering well over one million homes in the UK with renewable electricity.

The project is located 120km off the Yorkshire Coast and will consist of 174 Siemens 7MW turbines. The majority of wind farm’s blades are manufactured in Hull, from where they are shipped to the Hornsea zone.

To date, 172 out of 174 monopile foundations have been installed at the site, and turbine installation is expected to continue until late summer 2019.

The wind farm is a joint venture between Ørsted, a global leader in offshore wind, and Global Infrastructure Partners.

Ørsted began offshore construction and little over a year ago and expects the project to be completed by Q1 2020.

The electricity generated by the turbines will pass via undersea cables through one of three massive offshore substations, and the world’s first offshore reactive compensation station, all fully installed, before reaching shore at Horseshoe Point, Lincolnshire. The electricity is then transported via underground cables to the onshore substation in North Killingholme, where it will connect to the UK grid.

“Hornsea 1 is the first of a new generation of offshore power plants that now rival the capacity of traditional fossil fuel power stations,” said Matthew Wright, UK Managing Director at Ørsted. “The ability to generate clean electricity offshore at this scale is a globally significant milestone, at a time when urgent action needs to be taken to tackle climate change.”

“Ten years ago, the thought of a project of this size was just a dream, but thanks to continued innovation, a determined effort from both the industry and supply chain to drive down costs, and the natural geographical benefits that surround us, the UK has positioned itself as a world-leader in offshore wind,” Wright added.

https://gcaptain.com/first-turbine-installed-at-worlds-largest-offshore-wind-farm/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: January 09, 2019, 01:29:02 pm »

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Vestas Becomes First Company To Install Over 100 Gigawatts Of Wind Turbines

January 9th, 2019 by Joshua S Hill

Danish wind turbine manufacturing giant Vestas Wind Systems A/S announced today that, with the installation of a V110-2.0 megawatt (MW) turbine at MidAmerican Energy’s Wind XI project in late 2018, the company has become the first to install 100 gigawatts (GW) of wind turbines.

Vestas Wind Systems has kept itself in the news over the past two months with consistent announcements — including news in early December that it had surpassed 10 GW worth of orders taken during 2018. This, then, and unsurprisingly, continued through the rest of the month and, earlier this week I reported that Vestas finished 2018 with orders taken worth close to 13 GW — well in excess of its previous records.

In fact, in December of 2018 alone, Vestas took in confirmed wind turbine orders of 2,859 GW.

Not willing to fade from the news, Vestas Wind Systems announced today that, with the installation in late 2018 of a V110-2.0 MW wind turbine at the multi-site 2 GW Wind XI project being built across Iowa by MidAmerican Energy, the company became the first to install 100 GW of wind turbines.

The first wind turbine Vestas installed was a V10-30 kilowatt (kW) turbine in 1979. Since then, the company has installed over 66,000 wind turbines :o in approximately 80 countries around the world on six continents. A long way from a 30 kW wind turbine, Vestas’ largest onshore wind turbine is the V150-4.2 MW turbine.

“We have pioneered wind energy across the globe for 40 years, and to install 100 GW together with our customers and partners is something we are extremely proud of as it underlines how far Vestas and wind energy have come,” Anders Runevad, Vestas President and CEO. “It’s also a pleasure to celebrate this milestone with a key customer like MidAmerican Energy. Reaching this milestone has required continuous innovation, strong commitment and great execution from all Vestas’ employees, and the 100 GW, therefore, represents a key part of the foundation that enables us to develop the sustainable energy solutions of the future.”

Vestas’ 100 GW of wind turbines have helped to remove 129 million tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere equaling CO2 emissions from:

► 141 billion pounds of burned coal

► 298 million barrels of oil

► 22.54 million US homes yearly electricity use

► 33 coal-fired power plants

► Carbon sequestered from 152 million acres of forest


“With 100 GW of installed wind turbines, Vestas has installed around 10% of all wind and solar capacity in the world,” explained Anders Riis, Director of Communications for Vestas, who spoke via email, “but as the next 1000 GW are expected to be installed by 2023, Vestas remains focused on executing our commitments and priorities in the short term. By doing so, we sustain and strengthen the foundation that enables us to develop the sustainable energy solutions our customers and stakeholders need in the future.”

https://cleantechnica.com/2019/01/09/vestas-becomes-first-company-to-install-over-100-gigawatts-of-wind-turbines/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: January 02, 2019, 04:49:15 pm »

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Image credit: Vagn Gejl Donskov


Vestas Turbine Catches Fire 🔥 😲 In Danish New Year Storm 

January 2nd, 2019 by Jesper Berggreen

Since New Years Eve, it’s been quite windy in Denmark, and of the +6000 wind turbines in the country one of them apparently had to succumb to the pressure after many years of service. TV2 TVMV.dk reports (with video) that the turbine caught fire on Tuesday afternoon, and that the fire subsequently spread to a farm below. Nobody lives on the farm, but it is still in use for livestock and between 30 and 40 bull calves were in the buildings.

“The turbine stands where just below there is a two-sided farm with these bull calves. The wings have fallen into the building, and the barn has caught fire, which we have tried to control,” says Lars Stensbjerg, who is the leader of Fire and Rescue MidtVest.

Lucky for the bull calves 🐂 the wind had a direction keeping them out of harm’s way. They are all being rescued. 


 
Image credit: Line Flatau, TV2 TV MIDTVEST TVMV.dk

According to Vestas press officer Anders Riis, it’s an old turbine. “When the fire has stopped, we will initiate a study of what may be the cause of the fire,” he said to TV2 TVMV.dk.

With the address given I found according to thewindpower.net, this must be the turbine in question: “Commissioning: 1993/03 by Vestas. Hub height: 30 m. Total nominal power: 300 kW. Dismantled (2010/05).” That last bit of information is puzzling. Maybe at was decommissioned and replaced or maybe it was just standing there and the brakes wore out and made it spin again causing the fire? While accidents with wind turbines are indeed spectacular, let’s also keep in mind that they are very rare.

One year ago we reported that Denmark had a record wind energy year in 2017 and it will be interesting to see 🧐 if 2018 will beat that. Also, as turbines get larger, they get lower in numbers. In fact, if the current +6000 turbines in Denmark keep getting updated, it could easily mean a doubling of nameplate capacity with a third of turbines, and many new turbines are going to be off-shore in the future. So, accidents will probably be even more rare.


 
Wind profile from energinet.dk. Light green is wind peaking at 4 GW. Yellow icing is solar, and dark greens are conventional power plants.
 
https://cleantechnica.com/2019/01/02/vestas-turbine-catches-fire-in-danish-new-year-storm/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: December 24, 2018, 08:19:57 pm »

Quote
It is partnering with Neoline to build two experimental roll-on/roll-off car carriers powered by sails. Each will be 446 feet long and carry more than 45,000 square feet of sails.

Renault Will Use Sails To Cut Emissions On Trans-Atlantic Routes

December 24th, 2018 by Steve Hanley


article with the above video:

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/12/24/renault-will-use-sails-to-cut-emissions-on-trans-atlantic-routes/

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: November 13, 2018, 09:17:15 pm »

Scottish ⚡ Wind Delivers Equivalent Of 98% Of Country’s October Electricity Demand 👀

November 13th, 2018 by Joshua S Hill



https://cleantechnica.com/2018/11/13/scottish-wind-delivers-equivalent-of-98-of-countrys-october-electricity-demand/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: October 18, 2018, 08:31:14 pm »



Aeolus Energy Planning Jones Act-Compliant Fleet of Offshore Wind Vessels

October 17, 2018 by Mike Schuler



Orlando-based Aeolus Energy has signed an agreement with Norwegian shipbuilding group Ulstein to design the first Jones Act compliant service vessel for the budding U.S. offshore wind market.

Aeolus says the purpose-built vessel, known in the industry as a Service Operations Vessel (SOV), will be the first among a fleet of vessels to support the full scope of offshore wind farm operations from installation through decommissioning. Additional plans for the fleet include cable ships, crew transfer vessels and hotel ships.

As a Jones Act compliant vessels, they will all be built at a U.S. shipyard and crewed by Americans.

“The design and ultimate construction of these vessels will result in significant job creation and is a demonstration of confidence in the American shipbuilding industry,” said Elia Golfin, CEO of Aeolus Energy Inc. “We are excited to be working with Ulstein, an established market leader in vessel design for offshore wind. We look forward to pushing the envelope in the offshore wind industry where Jones Act-compliant vessels are concerned.”

For the design, Aeolus has contracted with Ulstein Design & Solutions, B.V. for its SX195 design SOV, which will be fully customized to Aeolus’s specifications and U.S. Coast Guard requirements. “The project starts with customizing the SX195 design, to optimize the new walk-to-work vessel for operations in US offshore wind farms, including featuring the X-BOW and X-STERN hull shape,” Ulstein said in a press release.

Ulstein Aeolus offshore wind vessel 2 Credit: Ulstein

The contract marks Ulstein’s entry into the U.S. offshore wind market as well, after having introduced the first dedicated offshore wind support vessel in the European market back in 2013. This year, however, Ulstein says it has already received five contracts in the offshore wind market, including two SOVs, a cable lay vessel and a large foundation installation vessel.

“Ulstein is proud to have been selected as design partner by Aeolus for developing the United States’ first purpose-built SOV vessel,” said Tore Ulstein, deputy CEO of Ulstein. “With our track record in SOV designs and supporting yards worldwide in building our innovative designs, we are committed to support Aeolus and its chosen US shipyards in realizing Aeolus’ new fleet development and jointly set the standard for excellent, Jones Act-compliant offshore wind vessels.”

Aeolus’ plans for the fleet come as more and more U.S. states, such as Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York, move closer having wind farms off their coasts. The Trump Administration has also signaled an eagerness to boost development in the U.S. offshore wind industry through streamlining the permitting process and by offering more offshore acreage available for leasing, part of the Administration’s policy to boost domestic energy production.

The first U.S. offshore farm, the 30MW Block Island Wind Farm, opened in 2016 off the coast of Rhode Island. Earlier this month, the project’s developer, Deepwater Wind, was acquired by Danish power company Ørsted, thereby creating the leading U.S. offshore wind company with a total capacity of nearly 9GW already in the pipeline.

https://gcaptain.com/aeolus-energy-planning-jones-act-compliant-fleet-of-offshore-wind-vessels/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: October 16, 2018, 02:09:52 pm »



Watch: 18,000-Tonne BorWin Gamma ⚡ Platform Installed in North Sea

October 15, 2018 by Mike Schuler

Photo: Ulrich Wirrwa / WiWiPhoto.de

The 18,000 tonne topside of the BorWin gamma High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) platform has been installed on its jacket foundation in the German sector of the North Sea, where will soon be used to supply green power to more than one million German households.

The giant converter arrived on board the heavy lift vessel Xiang He Kou which was used in the float-over installation of the platform at the installation site a little over 80 miles off the coast of Germany.

The heavy lift vessel Xiang He Kou arrived on site earlier this month after completing its voyage from Drydocks World’s Dubai Shipyard, where construction of the BorWin gamma has been underway since 2014.

A video showing the installation is below:


Construction of the platform involved approximately 13.5 million man-hours and used 10,500 tonnes of steel, more than the weight of the Eiffel Tower. Inside the platform is nearly 550 miles of cable.

Scheduled to go online in 2019, the 900MW BorWin gamma platform houses an HVDC converter station that will convert alternating current produced by offshore wind farms to direct current before transmitting it onshore to the German grid.

TenneT ordered the HVDC link BorWin Gamma from a consortium comprising Petrofac and Siemens.

“I am delighted that the topside has been safely installed at its home in the North Sea. This is a major accomplishment and something that the various parties involved should be very proud of, specifically our client TenneT and consortium partner Siemens,” said PetroFac project manager, Roberto Cecchini. “The focus remains on safe and efficient delivery to complete the project in 2019.”

https://gcaptain.com/watch-18000-tonne-borwin-gamma-platform-installation-in-north-sea/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: September 27, 2018, 01:08:24 pm »

Chartwell Marine launches new vessel for U.S. offshore wind

By Michelle Froese | September 25, 2018

Chartwell Marine, a pioneer in next-generation vessel design, has announced the launch of the Chartwell 24, a brand-new crew-transfer vessel (CTV) design for the international offshore wind markets. The catamaran design has been developed in conjunction with CTV operators, wind-farm owners and turbine manufacturers, responding directly to lessons learned in the construction and long-term operations & maintenance (O&M) phases of European projects.


Chartwell 24 transfer vessel

The Chartwell 24 transfer vessel is capable of carrying a crew of 24 workers. It has been built with a focus on ergonomics and safety, with features such as extra handrails and safety sliding rails. View its specs here.

While the optimum composition of an offshore wind fleet remains a topic of debate, CTVs continue to play a critical role throughout development and operations. This role has evolved in line with the increasing demands of supporting large-scale deep-water wind farms, encompassing not only the safe, comfortable, and expedient transfer of technicians to and from the turbines, but also a wide range of essential logistical support activities that keep a project running on schedule.

In this context, CTVs and their operators must offer considerable versatility, while maintaining the highest possible standards of safety and technical availability. As the industry looks to balance these objectives, vessel designs are becoming increasingly standardized – but there is still room to refine this formula. In turn, operators in new markets such as the USA and Taiwan have the opportunity to start on the front foot by taking advantage of the most advanced vessel technology available.

The Chartwell 24, developed off the back of 10 years of data and experience in offshore wind vessel design, aims to hit a ‘sweet spot’ in vessel size and capability that has been achieved by the most effective vessels currently operating in the European market. It aims to build on those proven capabilities, while responding to new requirements emerging as the offshore wind industry expands worldwide.

Specifically, the vessel, which is capable of carrying 24 industrial personnel alongside 3 to 6 crew, also boasts the largest CTV foredeck in the market, enhancing its cargo capacity. With four engines – and options for hybrid propulsion – the Chartwell 24 enables power sharing, enhancing efficiency and adding redundancy that maximizes vessel reliability and availability. As scrutiny grows on vessel emissions worldwide, this also means that the vessel is well-placed to meet international requirements, such as EPA Tier 4 and IMO Tier 3.

“With the Chartwell 24, we’re responding directly to tried and tested vessel support approaches adopted throughout Europe, taking and building upon the best of proven designs and equipping international operators and wind-farm owners with a boat that is built for purpose, and meets their needs from day one,” said Andy Page, Managing Director, Chartwell Marine.

Crucially, the Chartwell 24 introduces a number of safety related innovations, including a step-free deck that almost entirely eliminates trip hazards, and purpose designed walkways with handrails and sliding safety rails positioned for safe, effective and repeatable crew transfer. From an operational perspective, skippers benefit from full all-round visibility, uncompromized by deck cargo.

“For crews and wind farm technicians, that will translate into a high degree of safety, comfort and operational familiarity. For CTV operators and project owners, that will result in incremental gains in efficiency, availability and reliability that ultimately improve the way offshore wind farms are constructed and operated.”

https://www.windpowerengineering.com/business-news-projects/chartwell-marine-launches-new-vessel-for-u-s-offshore-wind/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: September 27, 2018, 12:58:37 pm »



MHI Vestas Launches Record-Breaking 10MW Wind Turbine

September 26, 2018 by Mike Schuler

Photo: MHI Vestas Offshore Wind

Denmark-based offshore wind turbine maker MHI Vestas says it has broken the industry’s double-digit power barrier with the release of the world’s first turbine to achieve a power rating of 10 MW.

The record-breaking turbine, called the V164-10.0 MW, builds on the company’ popular V164 platform, with more than 100 V164 turbines already installed in the UK and Germany.

With the 10 MW rating, the V164-10.0 MW model is now the most powerful commercially-available wind turbine in the world – onshore or off.

“What was unreachable before has become the new benchmark,” said MHI Vestas CEO, Philippe Kavafyan. “In launching the V164-10.0 MW today, MHI Vestas is proud to contribute this major milestone to the offshore wind industry. And it gives us the opportunity to pay tribute to all the wind industry pioneers who have led us to this historic, double-digit nominal capacity.”

With an approximate tip height of 187 meters, the V164-10.0 MW model is fitted with 80-meter blades for a rotor diameter of 164 meters. The also model incorporates a stronger gearbox, some minor mechanical upgrades, and a small design change that enhances airflow and increases cooling in the converter. According to MHI Vestas, these upgrades mean the V164-10.0 MW can run at full power at a site with wind speeds of 10 meters per second for 25 years.

“At MHI Vestas, we are focused not on what others are doing, but being the best at what we do,” said MHI Vestas Chief Technology Officer, Torben Hvid Larsen. “The V164-10.0 MW turbine is the best proof point yet that we do not accept the limitations of conventional thinking and that we think beyond ourselves. We have embraced the challenge of transforming what is possible in our field.”

The V164-10.0 MW is available for sale now and can be delivered for commercial installation beginning in 2021.

https://gcaptain.com/mhi-vestas-launches-record-breaking-10mw-wind-turbine/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: September 09, 2018, 12:08:12 pm »



World’s Largest Offshore Wind Farm Opens in Irish Sea… And It’s HUGE 👀

September 6, 2018 by Bloomberg

The 659MW Walney Extension offshore wind farm has 87 wind turbines capable of generating enough green energy to power almost 600,000 UK homes. walney extension world's largest offshore wind farm Photo: Orsted

By Jeremy Hodges (Bloomberg) — Orsted A/S unveiled the world’s largest offshore wind farm, an 87-turbine complex in the Irish Sea covering an area more than double the size of Manhattan.

SNIPPET:

The Walney Extension off the coast of northwest England has a generating capacity of 659 megawatts and is capable of powering 590,000 homes, according to Danish company Orsted, the world’s biggest developer of offshore wind farms.

MHI Vestas Offshore Wind A/S and Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy SA provided the turbines for the project that began construction in August 2015. The Vestas 8-megawatt turbines stand 195 meters tall while the 7-megawatt version by Siemens is 154 meters from sea level to blade tip.

Full article:

https://gcaptain.com/worlds-largest-offshore-wind-farm-opens-in-irish-sea-and-its-huge/

Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 20, 2018, 09:27:41 pm »


Offshore Heavy Transport to Enter Wind Market with Innovative Heavy Lift Installation Vessel

July 19, 2018 by gCaptain

ULSTEIN Alfa Lift design

Norway-based Offshore Heavy Transport is set to enter the offshore renewables market with a state-of-the-art heavy lift transport and installation vessel that combines semi-submersible capability with high-capacity crane operations.

The ULSTEIN Alfa Lift design is developed by Dutch design company Ulstein Design & Solutions BV (UDSBV) in close cooperation with OHT.

The patent-pending design combines the benefits of semi-submersible transport with a large, 3,000 mt lifting capacity main crane from Liebherr.

A unique feature of the dynamically-positioned, 48,000 DWT vessel will be its ability to perform heavy lift crane operations with the main deck submerged.

The vessel is purpose-built to transport and install up to ten 1,500 metric ton wind turbine jacket foundations or eleven 2,000t monopiles, plus transition pieces, supporting the installation of the world’s largest wind turbines.

The first vessel will be constructed by China Merchant Heavy Industry (CMHI) and available for construction and installation activities from early 2021. OHT has options for up to 3 additional units.

ULSTEIN Alfa Lift design

“We started the development of the ULSTEIN Alfa Lift idea back in 2015 with the driver to increase the safety of submerged operations and at the same time increasing the operability window for subsea installations using a crane,” says Edwin van Leeuwen, managing director at Ulstein Design & Solutions BV.

“It is great to work with such capable people. When we approached Ulstein with our intended strategy to enter the offshore renewables market and the idea of adding crane capacity to a semi-submersible heavy lift transport vessel, UDSBV presented their Alfa Lift solution on the spot,” comments Torgeir E. Ramstad, CEO at OHT. ‘That was a direct ‘hit’, as it allows us to enter the installation market, at the same time expanding on our capabilities in OHT’s core market.”

OHT’s fleet currently consists of five traditional semi-submersible heavy lift vessels.

http://gcaptain.com/offshore-heavy-transport-to-enter-wind-market-with-innovative-heavy-lift-installation-vessel/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: July 07, 2018, 09:00:19 pm »



Ulstein to Build Advanced, DP3 Cable Layer for Nexen

July 6, 2018 by Mike Schuler

The ST-297 CLV (cable laying vessel) is designed by Skipsteknisk, Ålesund

Norwegian shipbuilder Ulstein has secured a contract from French cable company Nexans to construct a large, DP3 cable laying vessel to support the growing demand for clean energy.


The advanced cable layer, designed by Norwegian ship designer Skipsteknisk, will be outfitted for power cable laying, including bundle laying, cable jointing and repair and cable system protection and drenching. DP3 will offer high maneuverability and station keeping capabilities even in rough weather.

Nexans says the newbuild is part of a company initiative to reinforce its manufacturing and installation capacities to meet the growing demand for HV cabling systems, particularly as it relates to interconnectors and offshore wind projects worldwide.
 
The vessel will feature a turntable with a large cable capacity of 10,000 tonnes, and the fiber optic basket holds 450 tonnes. The vessel is 31 m wide, 149.9 m long, with a deadweight of 17,000 tonnes, and she can accommodate 90 people.

“We are very pleased that Nexans, a solid and important player, chooses Ulstein to construct their new flagship,” said Ulstein Group CEO Gunvor Ulstein. “We have a strong organization with long experience in delivering advanced vessels. The contract was won in tough, international competition. We look forward to a constructive and fruitful cooperation with Nexans in the years to come.”

The vessel will be constructed at the Ulstein Verft shipyard in Norway with delivery expected by Q3 2020.

“We are experienced in constructing large and complex vessels and we look forward to commencing the work on the cable laying vessel for Nexans”, says Kristian Sætre, managing director at Ulstein Verft.

“The construction of this new cable-laying vessel is a fundamental milestone in our commitment to cleaner energy,“ said Arnaud Poupart-Lafarge, Nexans CEO. “For many decades, Nexans has been acting for energy transition and sustainable development. In this next exciting chapter of our capacity to meet customer expectations, the cutting-edge technology of the new ship will enable Nexans to support countries in their development of the unlimited potential of renewable power generation.”
 
Filed Under: Maritime News
Tagged With: Cable Laying, Offshore Wind, ulstein


http://gcaptain.com/ulstein-to-build-advanced-dp3-cable-layer-for-nexen/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: June 29, 2018, 03:04:34 pm »

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World’s Largest Wind Turbine Passes Final Hurdle

June 29th, 2018 by Joshua S Hill


Offshore wind turbine manufacturer and developer MHI Vestas announced on Wednesday that its flagship V164 9.5 megawatt (MW) offshore wind turbine, the world’s most powerful wind turbine, has been awarded an S class type certificate, paving the way for installations to begin in late 2019.

The race to produce the world’s largest and most powerful wind turbine has been an ongoing battle and currently, the next landmark will see MHI Vestas replace its own record. MHI Vestas earlier this year supplied two of its 8.4 MW wind turbines, fine-tuned to 8.8 MW, to the European Offshore Wind Deployment Centre (EOWDC) in Aberdeen Bay, Scotland. Additionally, MHI Vestas’ uprated 8 MW turbine can sometimes reach 9 MW, but only when specific site conditions are met.

The company will continue to out-do itself in the short-term, announcing this week that its 9.5 MW flagship V164 wind turbine has passed final certification and will now move towards installation at sites in late 2019. The certification was awarded a year after the company announced its 9.5 MW turbines which are larger than the mammoth London Eye Ferris wheel.

“This is the culmination of years of hard work and is something we are extremely proud of,” said MHI Vestas Chief Technology Officer, Torben Larsen. “The type certificate provides our customers with the certainty and assurance that the 9.5 MW turbine will deliver on its promise.”

“Announcing the world’s most powerful turbine and then receiving final certification one year later is no small achievement,
added Head of Product Management, Henrik Baek Jorgensen. “This is a very important chapter in the growing legacy of the V164.”

However, MHI Vestas’ competitors are already nipping at its heels, including GE Renewable Energy, which in March of this year unveiled its monster 12 MW Haliade-X, which measures in at 260 meters to the tip compared to a ‘measly’ 187 meters tall for MHI Vestas’ V164-9.5 MW. Capable of powering up to 16,000 European households per wind turbine, the Haliade-X is the long-awaited move into double-digit figures and towards the necessary power to economically and efficiently make offshore wind a necessary dominant force in the world’s energy mix.

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/06/29/worlds-largest-wind-turbine-passes-final-hurdle/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: June 22, 2018, 10:00:38 pm »

Liftra’s Blade Way 💫 brings down turbine blades without a crane

By Paul Dvorak | June 15, 2018

Wind turbine service company Liftra launched the Blade Way 💫 in 2017 and introduced it at AWEA’s recent Windpower 2018 conference, as a way to remove and replace wind turbine blades without the time and cost expense of a high-reach crane. Blade Way has a rated capacity of 14.6 tons, and it can work at peak wind speeds of 12 m/s.



These are the main components of a Liftra Blade Way 💫 blade-removal system.

A few of its advantages include:

Reduced mobilization costs that come from its transport in just two standard 40-foot containers. It boasts of universal compatibility thanks to a system that is configurable for all major turbine brands. Its proven wire system and controls are based on the company’s self-hoisting crane. Also, proven blade yokes are based on the last seven years of development in vertical blade installation technology.

The system is comprised of two blade yokes, one for the root end of the blade and one for the tip end, and a hub sling and hoist block.

The components of the Blade Way include:

֍ Blade Way wire system at the turbine hub.

֍ A dual light-weight crane with two arms for hoisting the hub sling and hoist block.

֍ A steel A-frame that attaches to the container for gaining wire height, and the

֍ Wire system that runs from a winch in the container through the A-Frame and both blade yokes up to the hub sling.

Blade Way 💫 brings down a blade for repair.


The Blade Way 💫 sets up at a turbine and removes a blade this way:

1. Workers position the blade to be replaced by turning the rotor to position the faulty blade vertically.

2. The dual light-weight crane is hoisted with the internal turbine crane and mounted inside the nacelle.

3. With the light-weight crane, the hub sling system is hoisted and hooked around the two ‘bunny-ear’ blades.

4. The root yoke and tip yoke are threaded and hoisted along the wires to each end of the vertical blade.

5. The root yoke clamps the root end of the blade, and the tip yoke clamps the tip end, both at precisely defined positions.

6. The blade is lowered to the ground, either with or without the blade bearing.

Once on the ground, the blade or bearing is changed, and the blade can be hoisted back up and reattached to the hub.

https://www.windpowerengineering.com/operations-maintenance/liftras-blade-way-brings-down-turbine-blades-without-a-crane/
Posted by: AGelbert
« on: June 22, 2018, 09:35:04 pm »

CGE Energy obtains U.S. patent for installation process of its WIND-e20 turbine
By Michelle Froese | June 20, 2018

CGE Energy, Inc. announces that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has issued U.S. Patent No. 9,970,410 to the company, entitled, “Installation and erec tion assembly for an elongated structure.” This patent covers the proprietary equipment used for the easy delivery and crane-less installation of CGE Energy’s WIND•e20 vertical-axis wind turbine.

CGE Energy says its WIND•e20 is the world’s only turbine that can be installed, maintained, and removed without a single crane. The turbine can be delivered on the back of a standard flatbed truck, self-erects, and be installed within days.

CGE’s newly issued patent covers a hydraulic installation frame, devised to support their WIND•e20 turbine (or other wind turbines or elongated structures) in a folded arrangement for transportation on a trailer, and to support assembly and erec tion of the turbine. This transport frame enables the turbine to be delivered on a flatbed truck and can lie flat for maintenance without the need of a crane. This diverges from the way traditional horizontal wind turbines are assembled after delivery, which typically require costly cranes for installation and repair.

“This unique patented technology offers easy turbine transportation using a single truck and trailer,” said Bryan Zaplitny, President and CEO of CGE Energy, as well as, one of the solution’s inventors. “The expansion of our intellectual property portfolio is an integral aspect of CGE Energy’s turbine development and commercialization strategy aimed at positioning the WIND•e20 as a first-in-class onsite energy generator.”

This patent adds to the list of other key patents that are owned by CGE, including having a fluid driven turbine that generates power from wind blowing from any direction, its generator and primary components located in the base of the turbine, and hydraulic locking joints within the turbine’s segmented blades, which allow them to collapse flat against the rotor.

CGE Energy’s strategic manufacturing partner for WIND•e20 is Roush, headquartered in Livonia, Michigan. CGE Energy is also working with Roush’s team to patent innovations that will make WIND•e20 an integral part of the community, bringing positive impact to communications, life safety, homeland security and emergency response.

The WIND•e20 uses three segmented blades to produce power from 20 to 100 kW, depending on generator size. The spinning blades appear solid to birds so they fly 🦅 around the working turbine. 

https://www.windpowerengineering.com/business-news-projects/cge-energy-issues-u-s-patent-for-installation-process-of-its-wind-e20-turbine/

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