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Author Topic: Power Structures in Human Society: Pros and Cons Part 1  (Read 8734 times)

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AGelbert

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Yep.  :(

There may be a method in profit over people and planet madness, but it's still madness.

I watched a free video at the Economist the other day. Colorado is making money hand over fist with the relaxed laws. Portugal has been wildly successful at decriminalizing all drugs. The bean counters that benefit from decriminalization are putting the heat on the ****s that don't. Good.  ;D

Global Compass: “Drugs: War or Store?” (Video) 

http://www.economist.com/content/global-compass-drugs-war-or-store?cid1=e/exedm/email/top/DrugsFILMpage/20150430-00:00am/owned/Drugs/Economist-Films/Films-/none/none/Global/none

Seems to me the mitigating argument on the other side is the private prison system in which states, having contracted with private corporations for incarceration of their incorrigibles, have a vested interest in seeing those prisons filled. As do the private companies, who profit nicely from prison slave labor (yes, quite legal) sold to defense contractors and billed at many multiples. When you create a market for prisoners, you get, uh..,. distortions. But profits. Watch the TWID space next week.

And then there is the asset forfeiture piece, the province of police departmental funding and private riches for many of our Boys in Blue. Part of securing operating funding, along with fee-mining the poor, a la Ferguson and hundreds of other ****house burgs in this country.

If we decriminalize victimless crimes, what will the cops do? Go back to walking a beat?

As the video at the Economist shows, the economics math, even for governments, favors decriminalization. The prison slave labor benefits ONLY the elite in corporations that contract with local governments, not the people that must pay taxes to support prison buildings and prison guard jobs AND PAY all the social costs of the drug war (corrupted judiciary, brutalized police, degraded democracy, MORE addicts, MORE health care costs, MORE theft and MORE violent crime, etc. ). Asset forfeiture also does NOTHING to benefit we-the-people or reduce our tax burden.

With decriminalization, the judiciary has no incentive to profit from their power to imprison as in the graphic you posted. The cops then will return to doing what they have mostly stopped doing since Reagan, addressing crimes that do have victims, including those committed by the cops.

According to the Economist, there is no mitigating argument justifying a continued war on drugs. The overall economic facts are on the side of decriminalization. 

Quote
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." -- Aldous Huxley
Hope deferred maketh the heart sick: but when the desire cometh, it is a tree of life. Pr. 13:12

 

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