+- +-

+-User

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

+-Stats ezBlock

Members
Total Members: 51
Latest: JUST4TheFACTS
New This Month: 0
New This Week: 0
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 15255
Total Topics: 265
Most Online Today: 64
Most Online Ever: 201
(December 08, 2019, 11:34:38 pm)
Users Online
Members: 0
Guests: 4
Total: 4

Author Topic: Historical Documentaries  (Read 2321 times)

0 Members and 0 Guests are viewing this topic.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32074
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • Renwable Revolution
Re: Historical Documentaries
« Reply #30 on: April 29, 2019, 08:11:27 pm »

Medievalists.net

April 29, 2019

SNIPPET:

The first genetic study of medieval human remains believed to be Crusaders confirms that warriors travelled from western Europe to the near East, where they mixed and had families with local people, and died together in battle. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators analysed ancient DNA extracted from nine skeletons dating back to the 13th century, which were discovered in a burial pit in Sidon, Lebanon.

The results, published this month in the American Journal of Human Genetics, confirm that while the Crusaders mixed with local people and recruited them to their cause, their genetic presence in the region was short-lived.

“We know that Richard the Lionheart went to fight in the Crusades, but we don’t know much about the ordinary soldiers who lived and died there, and these ancient samples give us insights into that,” says senior author Chris Tyler-Smith, a genetics researcher at the Wellcome Sanger Institute.

“Our findings give us an unprecedented view of the ancestry of the people who fought in the Crusader army. And it wasn’t just Europeans,” says first author Marc Haber, also of the Wellcome Sanger Institute. “We see this exceptional genetic diversity in the Near East during medieval times, with Europeans, Near Easterners, and mixed individuals fighting in the Crusades and living and dying side by side.”

Archaeological evidence suggested that 25 individuals whose remains were found in a burial pit near a Crusader castle near Sidon, Lebanon. All of those found in the pit were male and had been violently killed during battle, as seen by the blunt force injuries to their skulls and other bones. Their bodies had been disposed of in the pit and burned.

Nearby, an isolated skull was found. The head may have been used as a projectile that was catapulted into the opposition’s camp to spread disease and slash morale, illustrating the brutality of the battles. Clues found alongside the skeletons in the pit, such as European shoe buckles, a coin and carbon-14 dating analysis, led archaeologists to believe the human remains were Crusaders.

Based on that, Tyler-Smith, Haber, and their colleagues conducted genetic analyses of the remains and were able to sequence the DNA of nine Crusaders. The team report that three individuals were Europeans of diverse origins, including Spain and Sardinia, four were near Easterners who had been recruited to the fight, and two individuals had mixed genetic ancestry, suggesting they were the descendants of mixed relationships between Crusaders and near Easterners.


Throughout history, other massive human migrations–like the movement of the Mongols through Asia under Genghis Khan and the arrival of colonial Iberians in South America–have fundamentally reshaped the genetic makeup of those regions. But the authors theorize that the Crusaders’ influence was likely shorter-lived because the Crusaders’ genetic traces are insignificant in people living in Lebanon today. “They made big efforts to expel them, and succeeded after a couple of hundred years,” says Tyler-Smith.

This ancient DNA can tell us things about history that modern DNA can’t. In fact, when the researchers sequenced the DNA of people living in Lebanon 2,000 years ago during the Roman period, they found that today’s Lebanese population is actually more genetically similar to the Roman Lebanese.

“If you look at the genetics of people who lived during the Roman period and the genetics of people who are living there today, you would think that there was just this continuity. You would think that nothing happened between the Roman period and today, and you would miss that for a certain period of time the population of Lebanon included Europeans and people with mixed ancestry,” says Haber.

These findings indicate that there may be other major events in human history that don’t show up in the DNA of people living today. And if those events aren’t as well-documented as the Crusades, we simply might not know about them. “Our findings suggest that it’s worthwhile looking at ancient DNA even from periods when it seems like not that much was going on genetically. Our history may be full of these transient pulses of genetic mixing that disappear without a trace,” says Tyler-Smith.

That the researchers were able to sequence and interpret the nine Crusaders’ DNA at all was also surprising.

Read more
Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

 

+-Recent Topics

🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️ by AGelbert
February 19, 2020, 12:57:42 pm

2020 Presidential Election by AGelbert
February 19, 2020, 12:50:50 pm

Doomstead Diner Daily by AGelbert
February 19, 2020, 12:28:46 pm

Money by AGelbert
February 18, 2020, 06:27:18 pm

Profiles in Courage by AGelbert
February 18, 2020, 05:53:50 pm

Corporate Profits over Patient in the Health Care Field by AGelbert
February 18, 2020, 04:45:02 pm

🦕🦖 Hydrocarbon 🐍 Hellspawn Mens Rea Actus Reus modus operandi by AGelbert
February 18, 2020, 04:34:11 pm

New Pandemic? by AGelbert
February 18, 2020, 04:25:43 pm

The Circular Economy 👨‍🔬 (i.e recycle EVERYTHING 🌞) by AGelbert
February 18, 2020, 02:43:25 pm

Fossil Fuels: Degraded Democracy and Profit Over Planet Pollution by AGelbert
February 17, 2020, 11:33:30 pm