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Author Topic: Pollution  (Read 8889 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #600 on: October 11, 2017, 02:17:03 pm »


Germany set to widely miss climate targets, env ministry warns

     


DETAILS AT LINK:

https://www.cleanenergywire.org/news/climate-targets-grave-danger-union-wants-energiewende-ministry
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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #601 on: October 11, 2017, 08:59:05 pm »
 

October 11, 2017
'Unprecedented' California Wildfires: 21 Dead, More than 500 Missing

Despite studies linking increasing wildfires to climate change, the Trump administration scrapped an important Obama-era climate regulation this week--just as deadly wildfires spread across Northern California.


http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=20198


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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #602 on: October 12, 2017, 06:11:21 pm »
Agelbert NOTE: Nikola Tesla is proven right again.





The ozone layer over Antarctica follows a natural thinning cycle each year, which man-made pollutants exarcerbates. Ozone depletion is usually worse the further from the equator and recently an Ozone hole (as defined by a distinct area of very low ozone levels) has been detected above the North Pole in the arctic. Credit: NASA.

Human activity is destroying the ozone layer — again

LAST UPDATED ON OCTOBER 12TH, 2017 AT 8:13 PM BY TIBI PUIU  E-mail author

After scientists discovered a huge hole in the ozone layer above the Antarctic in 1987, an emergency UN panel banned the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) under the Montreal Protocol. CFCs build up in the atmosphere and react with the triple oxygen molecule to break it down. Thirty years later, the ozone hole is widely considered plugged — problem solved. Not so fast, caution scientists at the University of East Anglia in the UK. According to a new study, there are still threats to the delicate cushion in the stratosphere shielding us from harmful UV rays, which are due to harmful substances not regulated by the treaty.

A hole in the ozone (and the Montreal Protocol   

Many of the substances still harming the ozone layer were not included in the Montreal Protocol because their impact on the ozone layer was not considered damaging. Chemicals like dichloromethane, which has applications in paint stripping, agricultural fumigation, and pharmaceutical production, were thought to be “too short-lived to reach the stratosphere in large quantities,” explained David Oram, a research fellow at the UK’s National Centre for Atmospheric Science. 

At ground level, ozone or smog is a poisonous chemical often expelled by vehicle exhaust. High up in the stratosphere, ozone builds up at altitudes between 10 and 50 km where it acts as a shield against the harmful ultraviolet rays, which can cause cancer. Ozone holes occur naturally from cooling, but man-made chemicals greatly accelerate their formation. Currently, the ozone hole above Antarctica is the size of North America.

Besides dichloromethane, another highly concentrated chemical identified in the stratosphere includes 1,2-dichloroethane — an ozone-depleting substance used to make PVC, a popular construction material. PVC manufacturing has surged in the last couple of years in China, its main hotspot. What was unexpected, however, was the steep rise in dichloromethane emissions (mainly sourced from China) since this is not only expensive but also toxic. “One would expect that care would be taken not to release [dichloroethane] into the atmosphere,” Oram commented in a public statement. Over the past decade, dichloromethane became approximately 60% more abundant in the atmosphere as compared to the early 2000s.

“Our estimates suggest that China may be responsible for around 50-60% of current global emissions [of dichloromethane], with other Asian countries, including India, likely to be significant emitters as well,” says Oram.

Even though these emissions originate in China and other locations around East Asia, these industrial pollutants can easily leach into the tropics, where the air is more readily lifted into the upper atmosphere. In other words, these chemicals, albeit short-lived, have the time to interact with the ozone layer before breaking down.

“We found that elevated concentrations of these same chemicals were present at altitudes of 12 km over tropical regions, many thousands of kilometres away from their likely source, and in a region where air is known to be transferred into the stratosphere,” says Oram.

Ozone layer recovery could be delayed by as many as 30 years by rising industrial pollutants


Right now, the chemicals in question are not present in quantities significant enough to tear a new hole in the ozone layer but at the current rate of development, that may change. As such, the authors of the new paper published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics suggest this gap in the Montreal Protocol should be addressed by banning the chemicals or, at least, limiting their capability to leach into the atmosphere. According to Oram, the average date for ozone recovery, now set to 2050, could be delayed by 20-30 years, “depending on future emissions of things like dichloromethane.”

This is not the first study that identifies ‘very short-lived substances’ (VSLS) — chemicals which break down in less than six months — as ozone depleters. In 2015, a study published in Nature Geoscience found VSLS, dichloromethane included, are increasingly contributing to the depletion of the stratospheric shield.

“In the Antarctic region, where the ozone hole forms each year and where ozone decreases are the most dramatic, we estimate that VSLS account for about 12.5 per cent of the total ozone loss.”

“Globally averaged, the ozone loss due to VSLS in the lower stratosphere could be as much as 25 per cent, though it is much smaller at higher altitude,” Ryan Hossaini of the University of Leeds, UK, and lead author of the study said at the time.

https://www.zmescience.com/ecology/new-threats-ozone-layer-043242/

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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #603 on: October 12, 2017, 10:36:46 pm »

California Wildfires: Death Toll Rises to 23, 'Worst Air Quality Ever Recorded' in Bay Area

October 11, 2017 By Lorraine Chow


Firefighters continue to battle the unprecedented wildfires ravaging Northern California.

As of Wednesday, the fast-moving blazes—aided by high winds and low humidity—have burned nearly 170,000 acres and destroyed at least 3,500 homes and commercial structures since the outbreak started Sunday.

The confirmed death toll has risen to 23, with 285 reported missing. Thousands have been forced to flee due to mandatory evacuations.

A forecast of of high winds on Thursday could deteriorate conditions.

"We're not going to be out of the woods for a great many days to come," Cal Fire director Ken Pimlott said at a news conference yesterday.

California's drought-busting rains from last winter led to "explosive vegetation," as Pimlott said, and a hot and dry summer left the brush and other vegetation tinder-dry, stoking the flames.

While the cause of the infernos has yet to be determined, some scientists have said that climate change may play a role.

"It's very clear that the increasingly hot summers are the product of climate change," Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles, told NBC News.

Alex Hall, a climate researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles, also told the New York Times that global warming may at least be making the winds drier.

"That is a pretty key parameter for fire risk," he said.

The region's main utility, Pacific Gas & Electric, has acknowledged that gale-force winds downed some of their power lines.

"These destructive winds, along with millions of trees weakened by years of drought and recent renewed vegetation growth from winter storms, all contributed to some trees, branches and debris impacting our electric lines across the North Bay," company spokesman Matt Nauman told the Mercury News.

"In some cases, we have found instances of wires down, broken poles and impacted infrastructure. Where those have occurred, we have reported them to the CPUC and CalFire. Our thoughts are with all those individuals who were impacted by these devastating wildfires."

The wine country fires have released devastating air pollution.

"We are reporting the worst air quality ever recorded for smoke in many parts of the Bay Area," Tom Flannigan, a spokesman for the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, told the East Bay Times. "This is similar to what you see in Beijing, China in bad air days there."

The air pollution could even equal a year's worth of traffic, Sean Raffuse, an air-quality analyst at the Crocker Nuclear Laboratory at University of California in Davis, said. Raffuse estimates the fires have produced about 10,000 tons of fine particulate matter, about the same amount generated by the state's 35 million vehicles.

California Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency for the affected areas as well as for Orange County in the southern part of the state.

The National Weather Service has also issued Red Flag Warnings, the highest alert, for much of Northern California.

https://www.ecowatch.com/california-wildfires-air-2495879541.html


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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #604 on: October 15, 2017, 06:16:09 pm »
Almost 400,000 gallons of oil spilled into Gulf of Mexico 

BY JEFF CLARK jclark@sunherald.com

OCTOBER 14, 2017 12:45 PM

SNIPPET:

The Coast Guard is responding to the report of a crude oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Coast Guard Sector New Orleans said it received a report from the National Response Center at 1:30 p.m. Friday of a discharge from a damaged pipeline associated with a subsea well about 40 miles southeast of Venice, Louisiana.

Full article:

http://www.sunherald.com/news/local/article178904441.html

San Francisco Is Suing Major Oil Companies to Protect its Citizens from Climate Change
Sea level rise could lead to catastrophic flooding, and the city blames ExxonMobile and BP.

AMY THOMSONOCT. 14, 2017 6:00 AM

Full article:

http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2017/10/san-franciscos-sea-level-rise-daniel-herrera-port-seawall/

With No Clean Water, Some Puerto Ricans Tap Toxic Waste Sites

OCT 12, 2017


SNIPPET:

As Donald Trump waffles between cruelly threatening to pull aid from Puerto Rico and pathetically whining about criticism of his terrible relief efforts there, the island continues to deal with ongoing devastation. According to a FEMA report, nearly 40 percent of Puerto Ricans have no access to clean drinking water. The situation is so dire that some residents are attempting to get water from polluted, contaminated and toxic sources.

“There are reports of residents obtaining, or trying to obtain, drinking water from wells at hazardous waste ‘Superfund’ sites in Puerto Rico,” the Environmental Protection Agency notes in a press release cited by Reuters. CBS News Correspondent David Begnaud tweeted an image of the report.

The EPA cites reports of Puerto Ricans “obtaining, or trying to obtain, drinking water from wells at hazardous waste “Superfund” sites” pic.twitter.com/UW4ZW7RBUG

— David Begnaud (@DavidBegnaud) October 11, 2017

On the ground, groups of volunteer veterans have taken to social media to get out the message about how poorly this administration is handling aid efforts. In a widely shared video posted Monday, a group of four veterans, including a man identified as former Staff Sergeant and Cavalry Scout Jason Maddy, describe the lack of supplies coming in.

“We have an urgent message to get out about what’s really going on here in Western Puerto Rico,” Maddy says into the camera. “Right now, we’re only giving out, to people in the mountains, one small meal and six bottles of water per family. That is all they’re getting.”

“And the meals are really just kind of a snack pack,” another veteran, Chris Davis, says. “We can’t figure out why supplies aren’t coming in from San Juan. The local government here is doing all that they can.”

“In this area, we’re really the only ones here—we’re 12 volunteer veterans,” Maddy adds. “And people are hurting really bad right now.”

Full article:       

https://www.truthdig.com/articles/puerto-ricans-trying-drink-toxic-water-hazardous-waste-sites/

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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #605 on: October 18, 2017, 01:00:18 pm »
Video of Oil Rig Fire in St. Charles Parish

One Missing, Six Injured in Platform Explosion on Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana

October 15, 2017 by gCaptain

Full article with a photo:

http://gcaptain.com/multiple-injuries-in-platform-explosion-on-lake-pontchartrain-louisiana/
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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #606 on: October 20, 2017, 06:12:17 pm »


 
Global pollution linked to one in six premature death, It’s worse than wars, AIDS and road accidents combined


LAST UPDATED ON OCTOBER 20TH, 2017 AT 2:57 PM BY TIBI PUIU

An extensive study carried out by environmental experts found an alarmingly high percentage of all global premature deaths are linked to pollution, specifically airborne pollution. In 2015, nine million premature deaths or roughly 16 percent of all deaths can be attributed to pollution, according to the findings published in The Lancet. That’s one-and-a-half times more than the number of people killed by smoking, three times the number killed by AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined, more than six times the number killed in road accidents, and 15 times the number killed in war or other forms of violence.

“There’s been a lot of study of pollution, but it’s never received the resources or level of attention as, say, AIDS or climate change,” said epidemiologist Philip Landrigan, dean of global health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and the lead author on the report.

The elephant in the room no one’s talking about

The international collaboration that included over 40 scientists from leading research instituted around the world examined data on premature mortality from Global Burden of Disease dataset, which estimates mortality from major diseases and their causes across populations. Researchers gauged the effects of air pollution (particle matter, toxic compounds), water pollution (contamination, unhygienic sanitation), and workplace pollution (toxins and carcinogens).

The investigation revealed a harrowing landscape where pollution is causing a massive death toll, especially in the developing world which is burning fossil fuels at an alarming rate.

Air pollution was linked to 6.5 million premature deaths;

Water pollution was linked to 1.8 million premature deaths;

Workplace pollution was linked to 1 million premature deaths;

Premature deaths resulting from pollution-related diseases like heart disease and cancer outnumbered AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined 3 to 1;

About 92% of all premature deaths linked to pollution occur in low and middle-income countries.

Up to one in four deaths can be attributed to pollution in countries like China, India, Pakistan, or Bangladesh.

In absolute numbers, China (1.8 million) and India (2.5 million) had the most pollution-related deaths for the year 2015.

The United States, home to the world’s biggest economy, saw 155,000 premature deaths linked to pollution in 2015.


In reality, the scope of pollution may be even worse
since the researchers used conservative data which likely underestimates the burden of pollution on people’s livelihoods. For instance, the study didn’t take into account the effects of endocrine disruptors, pesticides, or flame retardants, all of which are widely used and known to contribute to premature death.

Most of these premature deaths occur in developing countries and disproportionately affect the poor. Nations like India or China have grown their economies at full throttle using cheap fossil fuels as gas but in doing so they’ve sacrificed the health of their population. Yet this isn’t an indispensable trade-off. The United States or the European Union have shown that pollution can be curbed without sacrificing economic output through legislation that protects the environment and regulates water use.

The findings serve as a wakeup call to policymakers but also to the public which is often unaware of the full scope of pollution and how it affects livelihoods for generations to come.

https://www.zmescience.com/ecology/pollution-ecology/pollution-premature-deaths-s0534543/

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