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Author Topic: Pollution  (Read 12904 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #735 on: September 03, 2018, 06:48:01 pm »
Environmental medicine explained

William Rea of the Environmental Health Center


Roughly 80% of illnesses are created by the environment and diet.

And what do average doctors know about these things?

NOTHING.

Here's an interview with one of the pioneers of this most important and still neglected area of medicine.

Electrical sensitivity is often paired (80%) with chemical sensitivity and illnesses created by mold.

The science is in and has been for many years.

Doctors are, predictably, completely ignorant. 😠

The news media which makes billions every year selling ads for the makers say nothing. 👎

http://www.nextworldtv.com/videos/environment/environmental-medicine-explained.html

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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #736 on: September 15, 2018, 03:14:49 pm »
Dave Murphy: Will Monsanto's 😈 Loss Result In Less Poison ☠️ In Our Food?

09/15/2018

Authored by Adam Taggart via PeakProsperity.com


Read more:

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-09-13/dave-murphy-will-monsantos-loss-result-less-poison-our-food

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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #737 on: September 16, 2018, 07:24:40 pm »
Media Coverage of Hurricane Florence Leaves Out Crucial Information

September 15, 2018

Analyses of the media coverage of hurricane Florence show that most outlets leave out the link to climate change and the real dangers the hurricane presents for creating toxic spills. 😠

We speak to Lisa Hyams 👍 of Media Matters for America 👍


Story Transcript

DIMITRI LASCARIS: This is Dimitri Lascaris, reporting for The Real News Network from Montreal, Canada.

Today we look at Hurricane Florence and two important issues that relate to this major event. One is the mediaís coverage of the ties between climate change and hurricanes. Another is a story that demands media attention, how hurricane-caused spills from coal ash pits and hog manure ponds in North Carolina, which is in the path of the hurricane, could harm low income People of Color. Our guest is longtime climate journalist, Lisa Hymas, director of the climate and energy program at Media Matters and senior editor at Grist. She joins us from Washington, D.C. Thank you for joining us today, Lisa.

LISA HYMAS: Thank you for having me. Happy to be with you.

DIMITRI LASCARIS: So, Lisa, letís start with something Media Matters and Public Citizen reported on last year. They found that major outlets dropped the ball while covering hurricanes. They often did not connect them to climate change, and after Hurricane Harvey, a devastating hurricane, two groups of scientists published studies that link the record breaking rainfall to climate change. Now scientists are warning of a similar pattern of rainfall and effects from climate change, and last year, your reporting revealed that the mediaís lack of coverage on this connection was quite significant. Thus far in your view, have the media done a better job of covering Florence and its to global warming?

LISA HYMAS: Well, itís been a mixed bag so far. I mean, you are definitely right that coverage last year was very poor, coverage that connected the devastating hurricanes that we saw to climate change. So, we here at Media Matters did an analysis of broadcast news coverage of Hurricane Harvey and found that both the ABC and NBC never once mentioned climate change in all of their coverage of Hurricane Harvey. And we found that they didnít do much better on Irma or Maria either. And as you said, Public Citizen is another organization that has done some analysis on this, and they looked at TV coverage and radio and newspapers last year, major newspapers, and found that just four percent of the stories about last yearís hurricanes mentioned climate change.

So, that is much less coverage than this issue deserves. I mean, not every story about a hurricane needs to mention climate change, but we should be seeing a lot more explanation to Americans of the ways that climate change exacerbates hurricanes and makes them more dangerous. So, this year so far, we have seen some good coverage explaining how climate change is making hurricanes worse, and even making Hurricane Florence in particular worse. So, Iíve been encouraged by some of the coverage that Iíve seen in outlets like The Washington Post, but also some regional newspapers like The Baltimore Sun and The Miami Herald have been explaining this connection.

On the other hand, weíve seen some bad work in this area. Particularly, Iíve been looking at what USA Today has been doing. So, the paper USA Today ran a decent editorial this week talking about the connections between climate change and hurricanes, but then they ran a couple of pieces on their editorial page that disputed the link. And one of one of them outright denied that climate science is a settled thing. And another piece that they published was by a known climate denier who argued, contrary to the science, that we canít see any influence of climate change on hurricanes. So, Iím optimistic by the good coverage that Iím seeing, but we still have a ways to go.

DIMITRI LASCARIS: And you mentioned The Washington Post was one of the more responsible media outlets. Do you know how the readership of The Washington Post compares to USA Today? I would imagine that USA Today has a substantially larger readership. Is that fair?

LISA HYMAS: You know, I believe youíre right but Iím not actually sure.

DIMITRI LASCARIS: Okay. Now letís move on to the recently loosened rule on coal ash disposal. This was the first Obama-era EPA rule changed by new incoming acting head of the EPA Andrew Wheeler. This move saves power companies like Duke Energy in North Carolina millions of dollars. But as Duke Universityís Avner Vengosh observed in terms of the environmental impacts of coal ash, scaling back requirements in particular could leave communities vulnerable to potential pollution. And he said, ďWe have clear evidence that coal ash ponds are leaking into groundwater sources.

The question is, has it reached areas where people use it for drinking water? We just donít know. Thatís the problem.Ē How do you assess this problem, and is there anywhere in the country where sufficient groundwater testing is taking place?

LISA HYMAS: Thatís a good question. I mean, weíre really concerned and a lot of people are concerned right now about these coal ash pits in North Carolina in the path of the storm. Coal burning power plants create massive amounts of toxic waste and theyíre stored oftentimes alongside rivers and waterways in these pits, or sometimes theyíre called ponds, that oftentimes arenít properly lined, theyíre not properly covered. Even when there isnít bad whether, they can leak into waterways. So, thereís a lot of worry right now that if there is substantial flooding, major winds, that could really contaminate water supplies.

I mean, one of the real problems here is that that is likely to hurt low-income folks the most. Theyíre the ones who tend to live near power plants. They donít put power plants in rich neighborhoods, they tend to be located near low-income people and minority communities. And so, the media and public health officials definitely need to be watching whether there are spills that will affect drinking water supplies.

DIMITRI LASCARIS: And I understand another important aspect of this that you have been imploring the media to cover is hog farms and their impact on low-income communities of color in North Carolina. While some of the print press seem to be on top of one aspect of the story namely, the dangers of hog waste getting into local waterways, you bring up a part that they are missing, which could potentially have profound impacts on the type of pollution on People of Color, and also, the role of the Trump administration loosening of regulations that could make these spills more likely.

North Carolina is home to thirty-one coal ash pits that house around, as I understand it, one hundred and eleven million tons, a stunning amount, of toxic waste produced by hogs. These ponds store about ten billion pounds of waste. Now, with the heavy rain from Hurricane Florence, this creates, as you call, it a ďnoxious witchís brew that might be headed into peopleís homes and drinking water. Please elaborate a little bit about the nature of this threat and whether you think enough is being done both to deal with the threat and to cover the threats, to make the public aware of the threat.

LISA HYMAS: Yeah, so youíre are exactly right. Iíve been glad to see that some outlets in the past few days have written about the danger of spills from hog manure waste pits as well as coal ash pits, but none of them have been picking up on the environmental justice angle and the people who will be hurt the most by this. Just as power plants tend to be located by low-income and minority communities, so do hog facilities.

So, North Carolina is home to many, many industrial hog facilities. You might call them factory farms, or the industry calls them concentrated animal feeding operations or CAFOs, but factory farms pretty much captures it. So, you have huge numbers of hogs in small confined spaces, and they produce massive amounts of waste. And that waste is, again, like the coal ash, oftentimes stored in pits that arenít properly protected, that can overflow near waterways. And that waste is really noxious stuff that could have serious impacts on water quality.

DIMITRI LASCARIS: As most of the nationís scientific community has expressed, extreme weather patterns appear to be on the rise. And as Californiaís governor Jerry Brown discusses, his stateís devastating wildfires are the new normal. North Carolina appears to have seen it a little differently in 2012, when the GOP-controlled state legislative body passed a law banning state officials from considering the latest science regarding sea level rise when doing coastal planning. The law was drafted in response to an estimate by the stateís Coastal Resources Commission that sea level will rise by thirty-nine inches in the next century, prompting fears of costly were home insurance and alarm from many quarters.

But residents and developers in the stateís coastal Outer Banks region pushed the bill, signed by a Republican Governor, saying, ďif science gives you a result you donít like, pass a law saying the result is illegal.Ē Iím sorry, that actually was a comment by Stephen Colbert, not by the Republican governor. However, as you write, the problem is not solved. Will Hurricane Florence and the pro-environmental Democrat Roy Cooper, who was elected governor in 2016, in your view, be able to mute the influence of developers and Republican majority legislature in that state? How does this become something that we solve in North Carolina given the political realities?

LISA HYMAS: I think itís going to be a challenge. I mean, youíre right to contrast California, which is really pushing ahead and trying to prepare for climate change and trying to fight climate change, with a state like North Carolina, where they really have been trying to move backward and pretend that climate science doesnít even exist. Iíll be curious to see whether Hurricane Florence has some influence on that. When peopleís homes are damaged or destroyed and their lives are affected and their communities are hurt, sometimes they can get a new view on things and maybe come to realize that climate change isnít just an idle threat, but itís something thatís already happening right now to communities.

So, I am hopeful that North Carolina can start moving in a more realistic direction, both preparing for climate change and fighting it, but we we will have to see. They donít have a great record so far.

DIMITRI LASCARIS: Well, weíve been speaking to Lisa Hymas about Hurricane Florence, the mediaís coverage of this major weather event and its connection to climate change, and the political rallies in North Carolina. Thank you very much for joining us today, Lisa.

LISA HYMAS: Thank you for having me on, itís been great to talk to you.

DIMITRI LASCARIS: And this is Dimitri Lascaris, reporting for The Real News.

https://therealnews.com/stories/media-coverage-of-hurricane-florence-leaves-out-crucial-information

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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #738 on: September 19, 2018, 02:08:44 pm »


September 19, 2018

💥Gas Explosion Rocks MA

Pressure in a natural gas pipeline that fatally exploded last week in the Boston suburbs was 12 times higher than what "the system intended to hold," Senators Ed Markey and Elizabeth Warren said in a letter to the pipeline's parent company Tuesday.

The explosion, the largest natural gas pipeline accident in the US since 2010, killed an 18-year-old, injured at least 25, damaged dozens of homes and forced more than 8,000 people to evacuate.

The senators are seeking answers to 19 questions about the explosion, while residents of the three impacted towns filed a class-action lawsuit Tuesday against Columbia Gas and its parent company NiSource.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-massachusetts-explosions/lawsuit-targets-massachusetts-utility-over-deadly-gas-explosions-idUSKCN1LY2QX


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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #739 on: September 23, 2018, 02:50:35 pm »
CleanTechnica
Support CleanTechnicaís work via donations on Patreon or PayPal!

Or just go buy a cool t-shirt, cup, baby outfit, bag, or hoodie.

Is It Time To Ditch That Loud, Polluting, Hard-To-Start, Smelly, Obnoxious Gas-Powered Weed Whacker❓ 

September 23rd, 2018 by Steve Bakker

SNIPPET:

Good question. Has the battery-powered device revolution evolved enough to make the gas-fired weed eater an endangered species? Could be. Iím going to share with you the experience I recently had when purchasing a weed eater to whack some seriously overgrown vegetation on my property. Since my past experience with such implements of mass destruction have always been of the gas-powered variety I started pricing just such a beast online. In spite of the fact that Iíve spent quite a bit of time educating myself on advances in Lithium-ion battery tech, converted every battery-powered tool and gizmo in my house to rechargeable batteries, and even have a battery-powered car on order (Tesla Model 3), it didnít occur to me to think green when buying a weed eater.

Very informative article and comments:

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/09/23/is-it-time-to-ditch-that-loud-polluting-hard-to-start-smelly-obnoxious-gas-powered-weed-whacker/

Agelbert comment: I have an old Sears electric weed whacker I purchased 20 years ago. It still works fine on a one third acre lot with a LONG extension cord. I never have to worry about batteries to recharge. 😀

I purchased a push lawn mower at the same time. We still use it. 😎

The last time I had a gasoline powered weed whaker was from 1983 - 1986. It was a bad investment.

ALL gasoline powered yard maintenance machines are horribly polluting and should be banned.

Quote
EPA Statistics: Gas Mowers represent 5% of U.S. Air Pollution

Cleaner Air : Gas Mower Pollution Facts

Noisy Noisy Mowers make bad neighbors...Noise Charts

And if that weren't enough...calculate your gas mowers emissions.

FACT: one hour of mowing is the equivalent of driving 350 miles in terms of volatile organic compounds. 😨

Fact: One gas mower spews 87 lbs. of the greenhouse gas CO2, and 54 lbs. of other pollutants into the air every year.

Fact: Over 17 million gallons of gas are spilled each year refueling lawn and garden equipment Ė more oil than was spilled by the Exxon Valdez. 🤬

Gardeners Spill More than the Exxon Valdezcleaner mowing, the effect of gas powers for one hour

Each weekend, about 54 million Americans mow their lawns, using 800 million gallons of gas per year and producing tons of air pollutants. Garden equipment engines, which have had unregulated emissions until the late 1990's, emit high levels of carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides, producing up to 5% of the nation's air pollution and a good deal more in metropolitan areas.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a new gas powered lawn mower produces volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides emissions air pollution in one hour of operation as 11 new cars each being driven for one hour.

In addition to groundwater contamination, spilled fuel that evaporates into the air and volatile organic compounds ☠️ 🚩 spit out by small engines make smog-forming ozone when cooked by heat and sunlight.


The EPA does NOT admit that electric everything can do all our yard work (AND farm work AND transportation needs) without polluting, but it does say almost the same thing (see below). Of course the Hydrocarbon Loving Hellspawn 😈 will jump in and say that coal power plants are giving us all that electricity (NOT true!), but we know that is a BALONEY excuse to perpetuate the planet killing hydrocarbon "business model".

The replacement of every 500 gas mowers with non-motorized mowers would spare ✨ the air

✔ 212 pounds of hydrocarbons (smog ingredient)

✔ 1.7 pounds of nitrogen oxides (smog ingredient)

✔ 5.6 pounds of irritating particles 1,724 pounds of carbon dioxide


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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #740 on: September 26, 2018, 06:06:40 pm »
North Carolina CAFOs Turning Waterways Into Toxic Toilets

September 26, 2018
 
These factory farms produce enough pig waste to fill more than 15,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools each year. And that doesn't even include the 2 million tons of dry waste created by the poultry CAFOs. So where does it all go? Normally, thousands of waste lagoons contain it. That is, until a devastating hurricane hits.

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

֍ Following Hurricane Florence, at least 132 CAFO waste lagoons had released pig waste into the environment or were at risk of doing so

֍ Itís estimated that 5,500 pigs and 3.4 million chickens drowned due to Florence flooding

֍ Before-and-after satellite images from the U.S. Geological Survey of a section of North Carolina coastline clearly show massive amounts of brown sludge pouring from inland waterways to the coast

֍ Liquefied pig waste may sicken people and contaminate water with pathogens like salmonella, giardia and E-coli

֍ Hog waste leaching or overflowing into waterways can also lead to algae overgrowth, depleting the water of oxygen and killing fish and other marine life in expansive dead zones

 Full article >>
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AGelbert

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Re: Pollution
« Reply #741 on: October 02, 2018, 12:52:31 pm »
Toxic building materials

A hidden epidemic


How manufacturers lie on safety data sheets

This summer I was severely poisoned and made chronically ill by a combination of two factors:

1. Toxic mold

A negligent landlord failed to repair water damage and allowed toxic black mold to grow hidden in the walls and ceiling of an office they owned. Then they rented the office to me.

They knew the mold was there because they periodically came (at night) to patch things up. I had no idea there was a problem and neither did the dozens of people who visited my office over the years.

For five years, my immune system was quietly being chipped away at until it finally collapsed one day "suddenly."

2. "Legal" toxins

Toxic chemicals were used to put a finish on some cabinets in my home. 

Because of my weakened immune system, the fumes from these cabinets had an immediate and catastrophic impact on my health.

I won't go into all the grim details - it would take a book - but I wouldn't wish what's happened to me on my worst enemy.

Getting information about the chemicals used in construction is nearly impossible.

Manufacturers are given all kinds of "outs" and - would you believe it? - they lie.  >:(

Here's why this is important:

People with weakened immune systems are often pushed "over the edge" by home renovation work because of the toxic chemicals used.

How many people are impacted this way?

80% of the people who experience a sudden catastrophic collapse of their immune systems have it as the result of home or office renovations.

Have you ever heard of this before?  ???

Probably not.  >:(

You or someone you know may be gravely or chronically ill for a "mysterious" reason that the so-called doctors can't figure out. (If they can't write a prescription based on 3 seconds of evaluation they can't figure ANYTHING out.) 🤬

In my case, I was lucky. The impact on me was massive and immediate. There was no doubt I was poisoned by the fumes.

Then I realized I'd been tired and sick-feeling at the end of every work day in my office for years, so, on a hunch, I spent the many hundreds of dollars necessary to have the place tested for mold and the test discovered toxic mold.

Dozens of people had been in and out of my office over the years and no one noticed anything. I sure didn't and I'm usually pretty observant. Then again, the building's owner - a church! - took great pains to keep a lid on the problem.

Mold from shoddy building and maintenance practices and "modern" chemicals are silently destroying the health and lives of millions of people each year.

The multi-billion dollar chemical industry   makes sure you NEVER hear about this because their liability would be astronomical.

A source to start your research: Book - "The E.I. Syndrome: An Rx for Environmental Illness" by Sherry Rogers MD.

http://www.nextworldtv.com/videos/environment/toxic-building-materials.html
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