+- +-

+-User

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

+-Stats ezBlock

Members
Total Members: 51
Latest: JUST4TheFACTS
New This Month: 0
New This Week: 0
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 14886
Total Topics: 258
Most Online Today: 56
Most Online Ever: 201
(December 08, 2019, 11:34:38 pm)
Users Online
Members: 0
Guests: 16
Total: 16

Author Topic: Pollution  (Read 18889 times)

0 Members and 0 Guests are viewing this topic.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31759
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • Renwable Revolution
Re: Pollution
« Reply #825 on: December 04, 2019, 04:50:56 pm »

IN 2014, THE DAN RIVER STEAM STATION IN EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA, RELEASED 39,000 TONS OF COAL ASH INTO THE DAN RIVER. DUKE ENERGY AGREED TO PAY $3 MILLION FOR THE COST OF CLEANUP, WHICH POLLUTED 70 MILES OF THE RIVER WITH ARSENIC, LEAD, AND MERCURY. WITH THE NEW ROLLBACKS FROM THE EPA, DUKE MAY BE ABLE TO TRANSFER FUTURE COSTS ONTO NEARBY COMMUNITIES. | PHOTO BY AP PHOTO/GERRY BROOME

Coal Ash Comeback

Last month, Trump’s EPA rolled back Obama-era regulations that limited contamination from the 737 toxic coal-ash sites in the US. In justifying the move, EPA administrator Andrew Wheeler said the old rule placed “heavy burdens on electricity producers” and the revisions would “protect public health and the environment.”

Coal-ash experts say Wheeler’s claims are phony and the EPA “should be ashamed.”

Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31759
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • Renwable Revolution
 
Make Nexus Hot News part of your morning: click here to subscribe.

December 16, 2019



New Study Links Half of Ocean Acidification To 🦕😈🐍👹🦖 88 Polluters

Last week was not a great one for climate litigation, with New York losing its case against Exxon for securities fraud. But while the fossil fuel industry is trumpeting that ruling as the end of such suits, the fact that the case was narrowly defined as a financial fraud case means it’s not as relevant to the other ongoing suits as the industry might want you to think.

And there may still be more to come, particularly as the science linking polluters with impacts continues to sharpen.

On that front, a new study published last week in Environmental Research Letters attributes half of the observed ocean acidification to 88 major emitters from the gas, oil, coal and cement industries. As coverage at ClimateLiability mentions, several of those crazy 88 are already facing lawsuits related to climate change, including Exxon, Chevron, BP, Shell, ConocoPhillips and Total.

With this line of research, “scientists can now quantify how much more acidic the ocean has become as a result of each fossil fuel company’s products,” lead author Rachel Licker said.

To do this, researchers used the Climate Accountability Institute’s dataset of pollution from those 88 largest emitters, and then applied the methodology they used for a 2017 study linking emissions to warming temperatures.

But because acidification happens at different rates in different places, depending on local conditions, researchers had to get a little more precise. They used 3-D models to explore the differences in acidification, and focused on five regions where acidification and rising temperatures are impacting the coastal communities whose economic well-being depends on a thriving ocean.

In the end, the research found that not only are those 88 companies responsible for half the acidification, but nearly a quarter of the 25% increase in acidification observed can be blamed on the 20 biggest investor-owned or state-owned companies, including ExxonMobil, BP, Chevron and Shell.

And in case you were wondering, acidification is just as nasty as it sounds. As Scott Doney, the study’s co-author, explained, acidification “makes it more difficult for many marine organisms to construct their shells and skeletons.”

This means big trouble for some very delicious, and economically important, sea life. As Doney describes, the species at risk “form the foundation of the marine ecosystem food chain- including some types of plankton, algae, shellfish, and coral that may struggle to grow and survive in a future warmer, more acidic ocean.”

So while 🦕😈🦖 ExxonMobil et al are no doubt celebrating their New York win , they still have plenty to worry about. Although the shells of clams and oysters and shrimp are growing weaker, the case against polluters is only getting stronger.

Read more Nexus Hot News:


Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31759
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • Renwable Revolution
EcoWatch

New Satellite Data Reveals One of the Largest Methane Leaks in U.S. History
Olivia Rosane Dec. 17, 2019 08:01AM EST


In February 2018, a blowout at a fracked natural gas well in Belmont County, Ohio forced around 100 nearby residents to flee their homes, as The New York Times reported. Now, a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Monday has revealed that the local incident had major implications for the global climate crisis.

Researchers used satellite data to determine that the blowout caused one of the largest methane leaks in U.S. history. It released more methane in around 20 days than the oil and gas industries of France, Norway and the Netherlands do in a year, Bloomberg News reported. The results raise questions about the ability of the oil and gas industry to control methane leaks.

"When I started working on methane, now about a decade ago, the standard line was: 'We've got it under control. We're managing it,'" study coauthor and Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) scientist Dr. Steven Hamburg told The New York Times. "But in fact, they didn't have the data. They didn't have it under control, because they didn't understand what was actually happening. And you can't manage what you don't measure."

The research is one example of how satellites can help accurately measure the problem. The paper's Holland and U.S.-based authors used data from the spaceborne Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) to determine that the well leaked methane at a rate of about 120 metric tons per hour, double the rate of leakage from the largest ever methane leak in U.S. history, which took place in 2015 at a California oil and gas storage facility. The satellite measurements also estimated that the leak spewed 60 kilotons of methane in total into the atmosphere, Stuff.co.nz reported. That's five times the amount estimated by 🦖 ExxonMobil, whose subsidiary XTO Energy owns the well.

"We deeply regret this incident occurred and are committed to identifying and managing risks associated with our activities to prevent recurrence," ExxonMobil spokeswoman Julie King told Stuff.co.nz in an email. "We are eager to learn more about their study. ExxonMobil is working with government laboratories, universities, NGOs and other industry participants to identify the most cost-effective and best-performing technology, including satellites, that can be adopted by all producers to detect, repair and accurately measure methane."

The study also raises questions about the climate safety of fracking and natural gas. While burning natural gas only emits half the greenhouse gases that burning coal does, methane is as much as 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. Methane leaks can therefore undermine the relative advantage of gas when it comes to lowering emissions.

The study's authors wrote that satellite measurements can help keep track of methane leaks that might otherwise be missed in calculating greenhouse gas emissions. Environmental groups are also increasingly embracing satellites as a tool. The EDF is even partnering with an aerospace company to build and launch a satellite dedicated to finding and monitoring methane leaks.

"We're entering a new era. With a single observation, a single overpass, we're able to see plumes of methane coming from large emission sources," satellite expert and study coauthor Ilse Aben told The New York Times. "That's something totally new that we were previously not able to do from space."

https://www.ecowatch.com/satellite-methane-leak-2641613644.html?rebelltitem=3#rebelltitem3
Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31759
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • Renwable Revolution

Chile’s Warning To The World + The Untold Story Of Fracking

By Eleanor Goldfield, Act Out!
December 19, 2019 | RESISTANCE REPORT

 COP 25 is over and the people have spoken – from Chile to Madrid, largely indigenous-led protests are highlighting the uselessness of these climate summits and the danger of falling for greenwashed false solutions in the age of climate chaos.

Next, you've likely heard of fracking, but do you know about frac sand mining? Ted Auch from Frac Tracker takes us into this seldom-discussed world of environmental destruction.


https://popularresistance.org/chiles-warning-to-the-world-the-untold-story-of-fracking/
Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31759
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • Renwable Revolution
And, according to two Natural Resources Defense Council experts, senior advocate Juanita Constible and senior scientist Kim Knowlton, the U.S. pollution-related death will likely “climb in the coming years if the Trump Administration has its way.” Massive deregulation by Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency, they warned, could “reverse decades of progress toward a cleaner environment and healthier people.”
Quote
Trump has acted as “the lapdog of the fossil fuel industry,” Magavern says. “Unfortunately, we have a President who has really made himself the polluter-in-chief and is making our air and water dirtier rather than cleaner.”

Air & Water Pollution Cause More ☠️ Deaths Than War, Tobacco, Drugs Or Alcohol

By Michelle Chen, Progressive.org
January 1, 2020 | EDUCATE!

By Michelle Chen, Progressive.org. Pollution

Whether it comes from a car’s tailpipe, a coal-fired power plant, or a toxic waste dump—claimed more than eight million lives around the world in 2017, fully 15 percent of all deaths. That’s according to a new report published by the Global Alliance on Health and Pollution, a coalition of environmental and health institutions and agencies. In fact, pollution is the world’s leading cause of death, ahead of tobacco use, drug and alcohol use, and even war. And the 🦖 United States is one of the leading sources of pollution-induced death.    -more-     
Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate:
For the Lord will plead their cause, and spoil the soul of those that spoiled them. Pr. 22:22-23

 

+-Recent Topics

U.S State Politics by AGelbert
January 19, 2020, 07:59:05 pm

🌟 IMPEACHMENT SCORE 🌠 by AGelbert
January 19, 2020, 07:44:35 pm

Doomstead Diner Daily by Surly1
January 19, 2020, 07:51:46 am

🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️ by AGelbert
January 18, 2020, 07:42:27 pm

🦕🦖 Hydrocarbon 🐍 Hellspawn Mens Rea Actus Reus modus operandi by AGelbert
January 18, 2020, 07:36:46 pm

Mechanisms of Prejudice: Hidden and Not Hidden by AGelbert
January 18, 2020, 07:28:07 pm

Creeping Police State by AGelbert
January 18, 2020, 05:09:32 pm

You will have to pick a side. There is no longer Room for Procrastination by AGelbert
January 18, 2020, 04:17:54 pm

Earthquakes by AGelbert
January 18, 2020, 01:58:04 pm

Non-routine News by AGelbert
January 18, 2020, 01:23:42 pm