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Author Topic: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️  (Read 32980 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1515 on: October 10, 2018, 05:38:54 pm »
Michael Mann: We Are Even Closer To Climate Disaster Than IPCC Predicts

October 10, 2018

A new report from the world’s leading body on climate change says we could see catastrophic global warming by 2030, and climate scientist Michael Mann says their predictions are too conservative

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DHARNA NOOR: It’s The Real News. I’m Dharna Noor.

A new report from the world’s leading body on climate change warns that in just 12 years, rising global temperatures could cause irreversible damage like mass extinctions and severe droughts. Just 12 years. The report from the International Governmental Panel on Climate Change, or the IPCC, says if temperatures keep increasing at their current rate, global warming is likely to reach 1.5 degrees Celsius, or 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit, above pre-industrial levels between 2030 and 2052. To avoid a disaster, the IPCC says governments must take “rapid, far-reaching, and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society.”

Now joining us to talk about this is seminal climate scientist Michael Mann. Michael Mann is a distinguished professor and director of the Earth Science Systems Science Center at Penn State University. He’s the author of several books, perhaps most famously in 2012 The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars, and most recently The Tantrum that Saved the World, a children’s book on climate change which he coauthored with Megan Herbert. Thanks for joining us today.

MICHAEL MANN: Thank you. Good to be with you.

DHARNA NOOR: So, Michael, you’ve been raising the alarm about climate change for decades. Talk about the significance of this IPCC report. The Paris climate accord years ago actually set 1.5 degrees above pre-industrial levels as an aspirational target, but this report makes it seem like that target is nowhere near enough.

MICHAEL MANN: Yeah, and In fact, even this report is overly conservative, as these IPCC reports often are. It turns out that in some ways this latest report has actually understated the amount of warming that we’ve already experienced because of the burning of fossil fuels and the increase in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. And so arguably we are actually closer to those 1.5 degrees Celsius and 2.0 Celsius thresholds, temperature thresholds, that are discussed in the report. We’re probably closer to them than the report implies. We probably have less carbon left to burn if we are to avoid crossing those thresholds.

DHARNA NOOR: But 1.5 degrees seems like such a tiny increase. Explain the history and significance of that figure, the 1.5 degree rise in temperature above pre-industrial levels, and how much worse would 2 degrees be than that?

MICHAEL MANN: Yeah, so 1.5 degrees Celsius warming over the time scale of a century is unprecedented. As far back as we can go, we have not seen rates of warming that large. And in fact, the level of warmth that we’ve now reached is unprecedented in tens of thousands of years. So even what might seem like a modest amount of warming can be profound from the impacts that that warming can have.

Just think about this. The warming that we’ve already experienced is more than halfway, it’s more than halfway from the warming between the last ice age and the modern pre-industrial climate. So we’ve already warmed the climate half as much as it warmed coming out of the last ice age. And that has implications for the melting of ice. We are inching ever closer to crossing key thresholds where we basically lock in the melting of large parts of the West Antarctic ice sheet, and potentially even the Greenland ice sheet, enough ice to give us not feet but metres of sea level rise in the centuries ahead. For every half a degree Celsius warming of the ocean surface, we increase the destructive potential of hurricanes by more than 10 per cent; closer to 15 percent. That’s a large enough signal that you can see it in the data. We can see it playing out. And when it comes to extreme weather in general, unprecedented floods and heat waves and wildfires and droughts like we have seen over the past few years, that is the face of climate change. It’s no longer subtle.

And that’s just 1.5 degrees Celsius. Every additional half a degree Celsius locks in more destructive, more extreme weather events, more melting of ice more sea level rise, and 2 degrees Celsius might be enough to basically destroy the world’s coral reefs. We’re inching ever closer to that threshold.

DHARNA NOOR: You mentioned that you thought that these IPCC scientists might have been too conservative in their estimates. And in coverage of this report of this IPCC report several outlets- the New York Times, Business Insider- are saying that we’re on track to reach 1.5 degrees by 2040, not 2030. So we’re seeing even more conservative estimates from the coverage of the report than is in the report itself. Can you talk about this a little bit?

MICHAEL MANN: Yeah. I think it’s sort of a bad game of telephone where, you know, parts of the report have been translated for the purpose of the summary for policymakers. And then there are press releases that have been sent out. And there’s been a lot of nuance that has been lost in translation, as it were. I also pointed out that the IPCC made a number of extremely conservative- I would argue overly conservative- decisions in how they measure the warming that has already happened. And by doing that they underestimate how close we are to these 1.5 degree Celsius and 2 degrees Celsius thresholds. And they overestimate how much carbon we have left to burn.

If you look, for example, at the Northern Hemisphere, which is where most of us live, and you ask the question when do we cross the 2 degree warming- 2 degree Celsius warming- threshold for the Northern Hemisphere if we continue with business as usual burning of fossil fuels? I showed in an article several years ago in Scientific American we crossed that threshold before 2040, in the late 2030s. So we are on the way, on our way to blowing past the 1.5 degree Celsius mark and crossing the 2 degrees Celsius threshold in a matter of, you know, depending on how you define it, it really doesn’t matter. Is it two decades, is it three decades, it hardly matters. In order to avoid crossing those thresholds we need to bring our emissions down dramatically. Arguably more dramatically than implied in this latest IPCC report.

DHARNA NOOR: Yeah. Another report from 2016, The Truth About Climate Change, which was authored by leading climate scientists, some of whom are actually on the IPCC, said that we’ll hit 2 degrees by 2050 even if every country fulfils the Paris climate agreement. That seems like a pretty significant difference, especially because that was before Trump was elected.

MICHAEL MANN: Yeah. Well, there’s a lot going on there. So first of all, the Paris agreement alone doesn’t stabilise warming below those dangerous levels of warming, below 2 degrees Celsius. There are credible estimates that have been done that if you tally up all of the commitments under the Paris accord- and keep in mind that many countries, including Europe and the U.S., are not quite meeting their targets at this point- but assuming every country meets its target, that only gets us halfway from where we would be headed, which would be towards 4 to 5 degrees Celsius warming of the planet; a catastrophic warming of the planet by the end of the century. The Paris agreement only gets us halfway down to the 2 degrees Celsius mark, and nowhere near that 1.5 degrees Celsius mark.

What that means is that Paris sort of gets us on the right path, that gets us on the right road. It helps us start to bend that curve of carbon emissions downward. But we’ll need to do a whole lot more work if we are going to stabilise warming below the dangerous 2 degrees Celsius, let alone 1.5 degrees Celsius warming limits.

DHARNA NOOR: To curb climate change, the report says that we must reduce global emissions by 45 per cent from 2010 levels by 2030, and altogether by 2050. It also says that by 2050 the use of coal as an electricity source would have to drop from nearly 40 percent, which it has today, to between 1 and 7 percent. About 67 percent of our energy must come from renewable sources like wind and solar. The IPCC report really puts the pressure on governments to act, especially the Trump administration. But Trump hasn’t even responded to it at all. Given our current political climate, you could say, is it even likely that we could do any of these things? Is it possible to take these sorts of policy actions?

MICHAEL MANN: Well you know, political will is renewable. And right now in less than 30 days, in less than a month, we have a critical midterm election here in the United States where the people can make their voices heard. If we are not satisfied with a president who not only won’t act on climate change, but denies it exists, and a Republican Congress that has enabled his denialism in his delay in dealing with this problem, we have an opportunity to shift the political winds in a direction that’s more favorable for climate action.

So that’s critical. People can impact the process. People can impact the problem by voting. That is one very important way that we can act to help avert catastrophic climate change. Well, even in the absence of national leadership- we have no national leadership on this issue right now. But we do have leadership at the state level. States like California, led by Jerry Brown. The other West Coast states, the New England states, many of the mid-Atlantic states have banded together to form consortia to put a price on carbon, to incentivize renewable energy. Many of our largest businesses, many of our largest companies and corporations here in the U.S., are acting to reduce their carbon emissions. And because of that we may meet our Paris obligations even without support from the president or the Republican Congress. But as I said before, we need to not only meet those obligations, we need to improve on them substantially if we’re going to- if we’re going to avert catastrophic warming of the planet. And that’s going to require leadership at the national level. One way to try to ensure that happens is to show up at the polls and to vote out politicians who refuse to act, who deny the problem, and vote in politicians who are willing to be part of the solution.

DHARNA NOOR: I don’t want to belabor this, but you know, you mentioned that the Trump administration was denying the existence of climate change. But last month the Washington Post reported that buried in this some hundreds, hundreds of pages-long National Highway Traffic Safety Administration statement is this prediction that the world will warm by 4 degrees Celsius by the end of the century. So essentially they said given that the world is going to warm catastrophically anyway, new policies- in this case a freezing of fuel efficiency standards- is just a drop in the bucket. So again, given this political climate when people are saying, you know, if the world is going to warm so drastically anyway, if the outcome requires such fatalism, is it worth acting in any case? How do you respond to people who say it’s too late to act?

MICHAEL MANN: Yes. So here you have two equal and opposite untruths. And It really speaks to the intellectual honesty or lack thereof when it comes to the Trump administration. They’re willing to use two completely inconsistent talking points. On the one hand climate change is a hoax, it doesn’t exist; on the other hand, oh, it’s going to be so large that there’s little we can do about it now. And what that tells you is that there is no good faith in their position on climate. They’re just looking for any argument, throwing as much mud on the wall as they can, to try to block progress to deal with this problem, because they’re basically furthering the agenda of the fossil fuel interests and the conservative donors who fund this administration and congressional Republicans today.

The reality is that there is still time to reduce our emissions by the amount necessary to avert the worst impacts of climate change, but not if we continue to vote in climate change deniers and fuel lobbyists like we have in the form of the current administration and the congressional Republicans who are enabling their agenda.

DHARNA NOOR: But what about some of the Democratic leaders who are leading the way on climate change? For instance, you mentioned Jerry Brown’s administration in California as being, you know, really precedent-setting in terms of climate change; really taking the lead on climate change. But critics would say that since he became governor he’s admitted some 20,000 new oil and gas permits. So do we also need to act on the supply side versus the demand side, versus things like supporting more wind, supporting more solar, and move to really stopping the production of fossil fuels in the first place?

MICHAEL MANN: Yeah. Well, you know, there’s a worthy debate to be had about the role of demand-side versus supply-side approaches to the problem. And I fear that when it comes to folks like Jerry Brown, who I consider a hero and a leader on this issue, there is the true danger of the perfect being the enemy of the good, or the very good, in this case. He has taken a leadership position at a time when we have a president and a Congress that wants to deny that there’s a problem, that wants to pull out of the Paris accord. He has taken a leadership position. He has set an example for other states to follow. He is moving ahead with an effort to put a price on carbon, to incentivize renewable energy.

So yeah, you know, there are no arguments that can be made that it would be great if we were to see maybe more action when it comes to policies on natural gas and pipelines. But you know, first we have to tackle this problem one piece at a time. And Jerry Brown has taken on a huge challenge in putting forward policies that have the potential to make the largest dent in this problem, putting a price on carbon so we level the energy playing field so renewable energy can compete compete fairly against fossil fuel energy in the marketplace. And if we do that, we know that we’re going to further accelerate this transition that is already underway away from the continued burning of these dirty fossil fuels towards a clean renewable energy future.

DHARNA NOOR: I want to ask you one more question about some specific policy implications. So it’s looking now like Jair Bolsonaro is likely to become Brazil’s next president, and Brazil is in the top 10 emitters globally. Many are predicting that he’ll lift all restrictions on logging in the Amazon. If he does that, what could the impact on climate be? How significant could that be?

MICHAEL MANN: Yeah, well, deforestation is a problem, and it contributes to our carbon emissions, as does agriculture and a whole lot of other human activities. Basically everything that we do contributes to our global carbon footprint. And we need to think carefully about our practices across the board when it comes to energy, transportation, food systems and distribution systems, buildings and infrastructure, city planning, forest management, et cetera. There’s no one magic bullet that solves this problem. But the lion’s share of our carbon emissions today comes from the burning of fossil fuels for energy and transportation. And if we can tackle that largest piece of the pie, we will make huge inroads in meeting our, you know, the Paris commitments, and getting- again, getting our carbon emissions on a path where we’re bending them downward towards zero, where they ultimately have to be in a matter of decades if we’re going to avert catastrophic warming of the planet.

We’re making some progress. We have to continue. We have to accelerate the policies that are helping out. And we have to think about all of the things that we can do in our everyday lives to try to help out. There is a role for voluntary actions, for personal responsibility in our food choices, in our energy usage, et cetera. We can all solve this problem through personal choices and by demanding accountability of our policy makers to enact policies that will accelerate this transition away from dirty fossil fuels towards renewable energy.

DHARNA NOOR: Given the need for individual action and also global action, what are you expecting from COP24 in Poland this December? Another big UN international conference on climate change.

MICHAEL MANN: It’s my hope that this latest interim report on the Paris targets, the latest IPCC report, will help frame the urgency of action. It will help frame sort of this problem that we’ve been talking about, that Paris is a good start. It gets us a foot in the door, but it doesn’t come close to solving this problem. We need to ratchet up all of those obligations that the various countries of the world made a few years ago in Paris. We need to make even more firm commitments. We need to make good on our current commitments, and that’s a challenge in itself. We have to make sure that countries are meeting their obligations under Paris, and that they’re willing to ratchet up those commitments in the next conference of the parties.

So it’s a, it’s a tall order, but it’s doable. To those people who say, who throw up their hands in defeat and say there’s just nothing we can do, that is not true. We’ve risen to the challenge before. We did it in World War II. We did it with the space program here in the U.S. We can do it here, as well.

DHARNA NOOR: All right. Well, we’ll be sure to keep in touch with you as we see what happens, and as we see what actions are taken. As always, such a pleasure to have you on. Thanks.

MICHAEL MANN: My pleasure. Thank you.

DHARNA NOOR: And thank you for joining us on The Real News Network.

https://therealnews.com/stories/michael-mann-we-are-even-closer-to-climate-disaster-than-ipcc-predicts

Hope deferred maketh the heart sick: but when the desire cometh, it is a tree of life. Pr. 13:12

AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1516 on: October 11, 2018, 12:43:42 pm »

Michael Treks Through Southeast After Leaving Florida Beach Towns in Ruins, Kills 2; Flooding Swamps North Carolina Towns

October 11, 2018

By Sean Breslin less than an hour ago weather.com

SNIPPET:

At a Glance

֍ Hurricane Michael carved swaths of devastation as it made landfall on the Florida Panhandle.

֍ Two deaths have been confirmed – one in Florida and one in Georgia.

֍ Flooding was reported Thursday morning in western North Carolina.

֍ More than 900,000 homes and businesses have lost power in the South.

In Florida, from Panama City through Mexico Beach — where the storm made landfall — and into Apalachicola, houses were swamped or blown apart, roofs were ripped off, boats sank and trees toppled in the high winds. Aerial images at Mexico Beach Thursday morning showed extreme damage, with homes swept completely off their foundations and destroyed and few properties left standing along the coast.

Full Article with dramatic video: 👀 😲

https://weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/2018-10-11-hurricane-michael-damage-florida-georgia-alabama-carolina
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AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1517 on: October 12, 2018, 01:35:53 pm »

Climate Crisis is Even More Dire Than the New IPCC Report Says 🚩 👀

October 12, 2018

The IPCC’s new report is groundbreaking, but it misses crucial points on climate tipping points and feedbacks that could make the crisis even more urgent, says Durwood Zaelke of the Institute for Governance & Sustainable Development


https://therealnews.com/stories/climate-crisis-is-even-more-dire-than-the-new-ipcc-report-says

Hope deferred maketh the heart sick: but when the desire cometh, it is a tree of life. Pr. 13:12

AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1518 on: October 12, 2018, 07:22:12 pm »

The ‘Greatest Hoax’ Strikes Florida


Denying climate change doesn’t stop its devastating effects.

By Nicholas Kristof

Opinion Columnist

Oct. 10, 2018

SNIPPET:

“One of the most preposterous hoaxes in the history of the planet,” scoffed Rush Limbaugh of Palm Beach. Gov. Rick Scott’s administration went so far as to bar some agencies from even using the term “climate change,” according to the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting (Scott denied this).

Myopic Floridians have plenty of company. President Trump dismissed climate change as a hoax “created by and for the Chinese.” Senator James Inhofe , a Republican of Oklahoma, “disproved” climate change by taking a snowball onto the Senate floor and noting that it was chilly outside; using similarly rigorous scientific methods , he wrote a book about climate change called “The Greatest Hoax".

Alas, denying climate change doesn’t actually prevent it. North Carolina passed a law in 2012 prohibiting the use of climate science in certain state planning, yet that didn’t intimidate Hurricane Florence last month. And banning the words “climate change” isn’t helping Florida now.

Some folks will say this isn’t the moment for politics. But don’t we have a responsibility to mitigate the next disaster?

Prof. Michael E. Mann of Penn State told me that Hurricane Michael should be a wake-up call. “As should have Katrina, Irene, Sandy, Harvey, Irma, Florence,” he added wryly. “In each of these storms we can see the impact of climate change: Warmer seas means more energy to intensify these storms, more wind damage, bigger storm surge and more coastal flooding.”


Full article:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/10/opinion/climate-change-hurricane-michael.html
Hope deferred maketh the heart sick: but when the desire cometh, it is a tree of life. Pr. 13:12

AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1519 on: October 13, 2018, 08:27:55 pm »
THE DAILY IMPACT

CHRONICLING THE CRASH OF THE INDUSTRIAL AGE

No Time for Optimism

By Tom Lewis | October 10, 2018 | Climate

There’s a dumb old joke about an optimist who falls off a 40-storey building and is heard saying, as he passes the 20th floor, “Well, nothing bad has happened yet.” We have met the optimist, and he is us.

The optimist is, for example, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Policy, which this week issued a report to a world that has not yet begun to implement the agreed-upon changes needed to hold global warming to 2 degrees Celsius. Two years after that target was set by 195 nations, after years of negotiations, at the Paris climate agreement, the world’s carbon dioxide emissions, the primary drivers of climate change, are still rising. There is no hope of limiting climate change to two degrees. But it would be so much nicer, says the IPCC now, to hold the increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

In other words: I started trying to lose 40 pounds a year ago, I haven’t lost any weight at all, so now I’ve decided to try to lose 50 pounds. Continue reading → Or hear Podcast 🔊 


Hope deferred maketh the heart sick: but when the desire cometh, it is a tree of life. Pr. 13:12

AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1520 on: October 16, 2018, 08:54:15 pm »
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Earth System Research Laboratory
Global Monitoring Division

History of atmospheric carbon dioxide from 800,000 years ago until January, 2016.

https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/trends/history.html
« Last Edit: October 16, 2018, 10:53:24 pm by AGelbert »
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AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1521 on: October 16, 2018, 10:31:35 pm »
Ep 1: Paul Beckwith, Nov 18, 2015 - Abrupt Climate Change and Relief Operations

ReliefAnalysis.com's full interview with Paul Beckwith on how abrupt climate change is about to transform the humanitarian community. 🔊 🚩

https://soundcloud.com/reliefanalysis/paul-beckwith-interview-abrupt-climate-change-and-relief-operations

https://paulbeckwith.net/
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AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1522 on: October 17, 2018, 12:34:33 pm »
A woman walks through a damaged store in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael in Springfield, Fla., Oct. 11, 2018. Image: David Goldman/AP

OCT. 12, 2018

How Climate Change Made Hurricane Michael More Destructive

By Joe McCarthy

https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/hurricane-michael-climate-change/
Hope deferred maketh the heart sick: but when the desire cometh, it is a tree of life. Pr. 13:12

AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1523 on: October 17, 2018, 01:06:49 pm »
OCT. 15, 2018

By Joe McCarthy

Trump 🦀 Admits Climate Change Is Real but Believes 'It'll Change Back Again'   

“I 🦀 don’t think it’s a hoax.” 

SNIPPET:

The president suggested that fighting climate change would be economically ruinous, costing “millions and millions of jobs, a claim that has been repeatedly debunked.

In fact, the renewable energy sector hired Americans at 12 times the rate as the overall economy in 2017, and fighting climate change could add $26 trillion to the global economy through a mix of jobs, health care savings, energy efficiency, and resilient environments.

The interview took place days after Hurricane Michael made landfall in the Florida panhandle, and Trump expressed doubt that the storm was made worse by climate change, suggesting that scientists making that argument have an ulterior “political agenda.”


Full article:

https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/trump-climate-change-60-minutes/

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AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1524 on: October 17, 2018, 09:16:57 pm »
Watch Hurricane Michael Destroy Panama City to Mexico Beach...
43,077 views



Weather Going WILD

Published on Oct 13, 2018

- Weather Going WILD documents Hurricane Michael and braves its destructive winds in Callaway, Florida on our way in to the eye of the storm!  This was one of the most intense storms I personally have ever chased in my 20 year career... #HurricaneMichael #PanamaCity #WeatherGoingWILD
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AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1525 on: October 19, 2018, 01:48:19 pm »
EcoWatch

Cherry Blossoms Are Blooming Across Japan. It's October.

By Lorraine Chow

Oct. 18, 2018 03:04PM EST

Japan's cherry blossoms are unexpectedly blooming this autumn.   :o


https://www.ecowatch.com/cherry-blossom-early-bloom-2613354002.html
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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1526 on: October 19, 2018, 01:58:32 pm »
EcoWatch

Deadly Flooding 💧 in Texas Causes Dramatic 🌊 Bridge Collapse

By Olivia Rosane

Oct. 18, 2018 08:46AM EST

A rainfall graph showing the heavy rains that caused flooding in Central Texas. National Weather Service

Two people have died in flooding in Central Texas that caused a bridge to collapse, CNN reported Wednesday.

Heavy rains led to flooding where the Llano River and the Colorado River meet in Kingsland, Texas. Flood waters rushed over the 2900 bridge for hours before it collapsed.

A rainfall graph showing the heavy rains that caused flooding in Central Texas. (at article link) National Weather Service

Residents in the area were ordered to evacuate Tuesday, and Llano County Emergency Management Coordinator Ron Anderson warned them on Wednesday not to return to their homes too quickly.

Bridge Collapse VIDEO:


"Texas is taking immediate action to respond to the threat of recent severe weather and flooding across the state," Texas Gov. Greg Abbot said in a statement Tuesday as he issued a state disaster declaration for 18 impacted counties.

The Texas flooding in the latest in a year of extreme weather events.

"[First] wildfires during the summer, now flooding," Kingsland resident bentley_n_frostie wrote on an Instagram post showing a video of the flooding.

https://www.ecowatch.com/texas-floods-bridge-collapse-2613283367.html
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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1527 on: October 19, 2018, 06:18:47 pm »
 
Make Nexus Hot News part of your morning: click here to subscribe.

October 19, 2018




Climate Feelings: Solstagia and Do’ikayt, Grief and Anger

The IPCC’s 1.5 report seems to have ripped open the never-quite-healed psychic wound that comes from a daily reckoning with the end of the world.


While Trump 🦀 seems content to rely on his “instinct for science,” doubling down on his  “feelings over facts” worldview, the climate community is currently dealing with the feelings the 1.5 report brings up.

Over at Grist this week, Eric Holthaus writes on climate grief- how he’s handling it and how others have wrestled with the psychological implications of knowing that millions of lives are quite literally on the line. Holthaus gives his standard advice to talk about your feelings with a friend--though admits that he has “no idea whether or not this is the right advice for everyone.”

In response, Rebecca Leber tweeted that instead of grief’s “acceptance of the status quo,” it’s “past time to get and stay angry.    

Anger is certainly justifiable, given the multi-million dollar campaign by fossil fuel companies to convince the public that there are very fine scientists on both sides of the debate and forestall regulations, even decades after their own scientists acknowledged the problem with their pollution. We don’t need new vocabulary to deal with profit-driven corruption, but we do need some new language for the feelings this destruction has wrought.

For example, Zoë Schlanger at Quartz wrote recently about how “in 2018, life can feel in need of a dirge for the whole world, with scarcely the language to write it.” As the climate changes, and our world changes, so must our language change to reflect these new challenges.

We know nostalgia, the homesick longing borne of time or distance between where you are and where you feel most like yourself. But what happens when you don’t leave home, but your home leaves you? When the steady seasons begin to shift and reliable rains dry up or turn to deluge? How do you capture the feeling of this new abnormal?

The answer may be “solastagia,” a term coined in 2005 by philosopher Glenn Albrecht. It’s a nod to nostalgia while combining the concepts of solace (comfort in the face of stress) as well as desolation, with the Greek root of -algia, for pain and suffering. When the constants in our environmental lives can no longer be relied on, it feels as if our homes change and leave us, even though they don’t go anywhere. It is, in Albrecht’s words, “the pain experienced when...the place where one resides and that one loves is under immediate assault (physical desolation)...the erosion of the sense of belonging (identity) to a particular place and a feeling of distress (psychological desolation) about its transformation.

“In short, solastalgia is a form of homesickness one gets when one is still at ‘home’.”

After defining the term, Albrecht discusses how it’s all-too applicable to indigenous peoples who have been sidelined as their ancestral homes are paved over. Sadly, they’re hardly the only group of marginalized people whose struggles may provide some inspiration or understanding for our collective grappling with solastagia.

For that, we turn to a lengthy New York Review of Books piece by Molly Crabapple about her “Great-Grandfather the Bundist.” The Bund, Crabapple explains for those of us not well-steeped in early 20th century Jewish history, was a “humane, socialist, secular and defiantly Jewish” political party that “celebrated Jews as a nation,” but were “irreconcilably opposed to the establishment of Israel as a separate Jewish homeland in Palestine.” Instead, they believed that “the diaspora was home,” and embraced a concept known as do’ikayt, or “hereness.”

Though Crabapple focuses on the history of the Bund through the lens of her own rebel-turned-artist great-grandfather Sam Rothbort, the idea of “hereness” is one that can perhaps provide, if not comfort, then solidarity, among the climate-concerned diaspora.

Crabapple questions what do’ikayt means “in our age of mass migration” and answers that it is a way “to find the self in exile, to square homeland with the freedom to leave.”



For the climate community 🕊 , hereness may be able to transform our solastagia into power, and provide a unifying sense that we fight not only to preserve a vanishing past, but to protect an emerging future. That despite national boundaries or political disagreements, a larger purpose sustains us. This battle to protect our collective global homeland will be waged in blood and sweat and tears, with our wins and losses echoing for thousands of years as excess carbon dioxide molecules cycle through the atmosphere.


This struggle is indelibly etched into the geologic record, but there is hope still, for the final score is not yet written in stone.
 


The Fossil Fuelers 🦖 DID THE Clean Energy  Inventions suppressing, Climate Trashing, human health depleting CRIME,   but since they have ALWAYS BEEN liars and conscience free crooks 🦀, they are trying to AVOID   DOING THE TIME or   PAYING THE FINE!     Don't let them get away with it! Pass it on!   
 
Hope deferred maketh the heart sick: but when the desire cometh, it is a tree of life. Pr. 13:12

AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1528 on: October 22, 2018, 02:44:39 pm »
...EYE OF POTENTIALLY CATASTROPHIC CATEGORY 5 HURRICANE WILLA MOVING NORTHWARD... ...EXPECTED TO PRODUCE LIFE-THREATENING STORM SURGE, WIND, AND RAINFALL OVER PORTIONS OF WEST-CENTRAL AND SOUTHWESTERN MEXICO...



More Graphics:



https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphics_ep4+shtml/173645.shtml?gm_track#contents

Hope deferred maketh the heart sick: but when the desire cometh, it is a tree of life. Pr. 13:12

AGelbert

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Re: 🚩 Global Climate Chaos ☠️
« Reply #1529 on: October 22, 2018, 11:00:06 pm »

Protestors Call Out Hypocrisy At Equator Principles Meeting

October 22nd, 2018 by Carolyn Fortuna

SNIPPET:

In October, 2018, major global banks met to revise the Equator Principles, which are industry-led due diligence standards to prevent banks from endorsing environmentally and socially harmful projects. In what many see as a duplicitous move, however, several of the Equator Principles signatories also continue to support Enbridge, the Canadian company behind the Line 3 tar sands pipeline.

Protests took place during the October Equator Principles Association meeting, and activists called out the Enbridge-funding banks for complicity in violating Indigenous rights and promoting investments in dirty energy. The protestors made visible the needs for financial institutions to be held accountable for investments that are incompatible with the goals of the Paris Agreement on climate as well as to end Indigenous rights abuses and climate chaos.

Full article:

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/10/22/protestors-call-out-hypocrisy-at-equator-principles-meeting/
Hope deferred maketh the heart sick: but when the desire cometh, it is a tree of life. Pr. 13:12

 

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