+- +-

+-User

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

+-Stats ezBlock

Members
Total Members: 41
Latest: GWarnock
New This Month: 1
New This Week: 0
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 8247
Total Topics: 226
Most Online Today: 2
Most Online Ever: 48
(June 03, 2014, 03:09:30 am)
Users Online
Members: 0
Guests: 1
Total: 1

Author Topic: Global Warming is WITH US  (Read 18408 times)

0 Members and 0 Guests are viewing this topic.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #990 on: August 28, 2017, 01:59:00 pm »

Hurricane Harvey Costs Seen at Catastrophic Levels With Many Uninsured

By Sonali Basak

August 27, 2017, 7:53 PM ADT August 28, 2017, 1:44 PM ADT

Damages may be $30 billion, according to one initial estimate ‘Historic event is currently unfolding,’ insurance broker says
News with video:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-08-27/harvey-s-cost-reaches-catastrophe-as-modelers-see-many-uninsured
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #991 on: August 28, 2017, 02:55:12 pm »
Agelbert NOTE:For those who think that a massive collapse and die-off of humanity is going to stop global Warming any time soon, this report clearly states that you are 100% WRONG. 

The baked in lag of temperature increase from CO2 fossil fuel burning caused pollution is at least 30 years. That means a MINIMUM of TWICE that long for us to reach where we are NOW (i.e. 50 PPM of CO2 ABOVE where we NEED TO BE of 350PPM), even if 99% of the human species died in the next ten years.
 
You believe a carefuly crafted lie (by the fossil fuelers and/or climate change deniers) that the coming collapse of industrial civilization followed by the inevitable large human population die-off will make life fine and dandy for the remnant. You are a fool to believe that. But I understand why you might cling to that breathtakingly ignorant bit of wishful thinking despite overwhelming scientific evidence to the contrary.


Also, for those who wish to pretend serious climate scientists did not anticipate or predict increasingly severe and devastating storms like Hurricane Harvey, please read this news from August 8, 2017. Those predictions have been clearly stated in scientific peer reviewed studies now for well over TWENTY YEARS. And long before that, the catastraphic consequences of climate change from CO2 pollution were predicted (over 40 YEARS AGO by Exxon scientists who have gone public with that information).

I placed in bold the parts I want you to see clearly.

National Assessment contains dire forecast

Government Report Finds Drastic Impact of Climate Change on U.S.

The New York Times, Aug. 8, 2017
 
WASHINGTON — The average temperature in the United States has risen rapidly and drastically since 1980, and recent decades have been the warmest of the past 1,500 years, according to a sweeping federal climate change report awaiting approval by the Trump administration.
 
The draft report by scientists from 13 federal agencies, which has not yet been made public, concludes that Americans are feeling the effects of climate change right now. It directly contradicts claims by President Trump and members of his cabinet who say that the human contribution to climate change is uncertain, and that the ability to predict the effects is limited.
 
“Evidence for a changing climate abounds, from the top of the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans,” a draft of the report states. A copy of it was obtained by The New York Times.
 
The authors note that thousands of studies, conducted by tens of thousands of scientists, have documented climate changes on land and in the air. “Many lines of evidence demonstrate that human activities, especially emissions of greenhouse (heat-trapping) gases, are primarily responsible for recent observed climate change,” they wrote.
 
The report was completed this year and is a special science section of the National Climate Assessment, which is congressionally mandated every four years. The National Academy of Sciences has signed off on the draft report, and the authors are awaiting permission from the Trump administration to release it.
 
One government scientist who worke on the report, Katharine Hayhoe, a professor of political science at Texas Tech University, called the conclusions among “the most comprehensive climate science reports” to be published. Another scientist involved in the process, who spoke to The New York Times on the condition of anonymity, said he and others were concerned that it would be suppressed.
 
The White House and the Environmental Protection Agency did not immediately return calls or respond to emails requesting comment on Monday night.
 
The report concludes that even if humans immediately stopped emitting greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, the world would still feel at least an additional 0.50 degrees Fahrenheit (0.30 degrees Celsius) of warming over this century compared with today. The projected actual rise, scientists say, will be as much as 2 degrees Celsius.
 
A small difference in global temperatures can make a big difference in the climate: The difference between a rise in global temperatures of 1.5 degrees Celsius and one of 2 degrees Celsius, for example, could mean longer heat waves, more intense rainstorms and the faster disintegration of coral reefs.
 
Among the more significant of the study’s findings is that it is possible to attribute some extreme weather to climate change. The field known as “attribution science” has advanced rapidly in response to increasing risks from climate change.
 
The E.P.A. is one of 13 agencies that must approve the report by Aug. 18. The agency’s administrator, Scott Pruitt, has said he does not believe that carbon dioxide is a primary contributor to global warming.
 
“It’s a fraught situation,” said  Michael Oppenheimer, a professor of geoscience and international affairs at Princeton University who was not involved in the study. “This is the first case in which an analysis of climate change of this scope has come up in the Trump administration, and scientists will be watching very carefully to see how they handle it.”
 
Scientists say they fear that the Trump administration could change or suppress the report. But those who challenge scientific data on human-caused climate change say they are equally worried that the draft report, as well as the larger National Climate Assessment, will be publicly released. One government scientist who worked on the report, Katharine Hayhoe, a professor of political science at Texas Tech University, called the conclusions among “the most comprehensive climate science reports” to be published. Another scientist involved in the process, who spoke to The New York Times on the condition of anonymity, said he and others were concerned that it would be suppressed.
 
The National Climate Assessment “seems to be on autopilot” because of a lack of political direction, said Myron Ebell, a senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute.
 
The report says significant advances have been made linking human influence to individual extreme weather events since the last National Climate Assessment was produced in 2014. Still, it notes, crucial uncertainties remain.
 
It cites the European heat wave of 2003 and the record heat in Australia in 2013 as specific episodes where “relatively strong evidence” showed that a man-made factor contributed to the extreme weather.
 
In the United States, the authors write, the heat wave that broiled Texas in 2011 was more complicated. That year was Texas’ driest on record, and one study cited in the report said local weather variability and La Niña were the primary causes, with a “relatively small” warming contribution. Another study had concluded that climate change made extreme events 20 times more likely in Texas.
 
Based on those and other conflicting studies, the federal draft concludes that there was a medium likelihood that climate change played a role in the Texas heat wave. But it avoids assessing other individual weather events for their link to climate change. Generally, the report described linking recent major droughts in the United States to human activity as “complicated,” saying that while many droughts have been long and severe, they have not been unprecedented in the earth’s hydrologic natural variation.
 
Worldwide, the draft report finds it “extremely likely” that more than half of the global mean temperature increase since 1951 can be linked to human influence.
 
In the United States, the report concludes with “very high” confidence that the number and severity of cool nights have decreased since the 1960s, while the frequency and severity of warm days have increased. Extreme cold waves, it says, are less common since the 1980s, while extreme heat waves are more common.
 
The study examines every corner of the United States and finds that all of it was touched by climate change. The average annual temperature in the United States will continue to rise, the authors write, making recent record-setting years “relatively common” in the near future. It projects increases of 5.0 to 7.5 degrees Fahrenheit (2.8 to 4.8 degrees Celsius) by the late century, depending on the level of future emissions.
 
It says the average annual rainfall across the country has increased by about 4 percent since the beginning of the 20th century. Parts of the West, Southwest and Southeast are drying up, while the Southern Plains and the Midwest are getting wetter.
 
With a medium degree of confidence, the authors linked the contribution of human-caused warming to rising temperatures over the Western and Northern United States. It found no direct link in the Southeast.
 
Additionally, the government scientists wrote that surface, air and ground temperatures in Alaska and the Arctic are rising at a frighteningly fast rate — twice as fast as the global average.
 
“It is very likely that the accelerated rate of Arctic warming will have a significant consequence for the United States due to accelerating land and sea ice melting that is driving changes in the ocean including sea level rise threatening our coastal communities,” the report says.
 
Human activity, the report goes on to say, is a primary culprit.
 
The study does not make policy recommendations, but it notes that stabilizing the global mean temperature increase to 2 degrees Celsius — what scientists have referred to as the guardrail beyond which changes become catastrophic — will require significant reductions in global levels of carbon dioxide.
 
Nearly 200 nations agreed as part of the Paris accords to limit or cut fossil fuel emissions. If countries make good on those promises, the federal report says, that will be a key step toward keeping global warming at manageable levels.
 
Mr. Trump announced this year that the United States would withdraw from the Paris agreement, saying the deal was bad for America.
 
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/07/climate/climate-change-drastic-warming-trump.html

Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #992 on: August 28, 2017, 05:37:30 pm »
Agelbert NOTE: The Trump Fossil Fuel Tool just claimed that the Hurricane Harvey Damage in Texas is a "500 year event". View the video below or read the transcript to learn why the following meter reading is correct for Trump's verbal effluent.




August 27, 2017

Sandy-Level Hurricanes May Occur Every Five Years Due to Climate Change

Leading climatologist Benjamin Horton talks about recent reports from NASA and NOAA showing increasingly higher global temperatures, and explains why the dangerous human-caused trend could spell disaster


TRANSCRIPT:

Sandy-Level Hurricanes May Occur Every Five Years Due to Climate Change

Dimitri Lascaris:   This is Dimitri Lascaris for The Real News. It's official: according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, land temperatures this last July were the hottest on record Including ocean temperatures, the NOAA ranked July as the second hottest month ever recorded, trailing July 2016 by less than one tenth of 1°. Last week, an independent analysis from NASA found July 2017 to be tied with July and August of 2016 as the hottest month on record. These temperatures came after 2016 was determined to be the hottest year on record. With us to discuss this disturbing trend in global temperatures is Dr. Benjamin Horton. Dr. Horton is a professor in the Asian School of the Environment at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Professor Horton's research concerns sea level change, and he aims to understand and integrate external and internal mechanisms that have determined sea level changes in the past, and which will shape such changes in the future. He joins us today from Singapore. Welcome to The Real News, Doctor Horton.

Benjamin Horton:   Good afternoon.

Dimitri Lascaris:   So first, please tell us if there is a significant discrepancy between the NASA and NOAA findings, with respect to temperatures in July 2017, and if so, what is the significance of that discrepancy?

Benjamin Horton:   Well, I think the most important conclusion of that is that two independent measurements of global atmosphere and ocean temperatures come out with the same conclusion: that the July temperatures in 2017 were anomalous. They were well above the long-term average of the twentieth century. So slight discrepancies between them being the warmest, or tied second warmest are irrelevant, really. I think the important thing for your listeners is that we've got two independent measurements, and they use similar data sets, but they use different statistical analysis. And they come out of the same conclusion, that July 2017 was approximately around 1.5°F greater than the twentieth century average, with the warmest July occurring in 2016.
And it's part of a trend. Nine of the ten warmest July's occurred in the 20 first century. The only exception is a very, very warm year in 1998. And then you can start to think even more, and these numbers are astounding, in July 2017 marked the 41st consecutive July temperature that was larger than the global average, and the 391st month with global temperatures above the twentieth century average. So we're just building a body of data that's irrefutable that our climate is changing.

Dimitri Lascaris:   And these results for the most recent July occurred in a non-El Niño year. Could you talk to us about the significance of that? Why should it concern us that we're seeing these temperatures in July in a non-El Niño year?

Benjamin Horton:   Well, this all concerns natural variability, so on top of the trend of increasing temperatures to do with greenhouse gas emissions, we have a natural variability in our Earth. And one of the controlling factors for global temperatures is called the El Niño Southern Oscillation, ENSO. And this concerns the Pacific Ocean. We are a blue planet, and the Pacific Ocean is the largest. And during El Niño years, the Pacific Ocean warms up and that amplifies the global warming effect, to do with anthropogenic emissions. In the opposite or neutral years, which we are in today, you have a dampening effect. So the importance of these temperatures occurring at record levels is where occurring at a time when it's just driven by anthropogenic effects, where natural variability is not enhancing the readings.

Dimitri Lascaris:   Now according to the NOAA's state of the climate report, several other record-breaking events occurred in 2016, among them greenhouse gases hit their highest recorded concentration in nearly 1 million years. In addition, 12% of the Earth endured severe drought, Alpine glaciers retreated for the 37th year in a row, and global sea levels hit a record high. I just want to focus on the concentration of greenhouse gases and current trends in greenhouse gas emissions. Given where we now stand, and given current trends in greenhouse gas emissions, is it realistic to expect, is there any significant hope of us ensuring that the global temperature increase remains within the aspirational goal of 1.5°C set forth in the Paris Climate Accord, or is that something, which realistically, is not achievable at this stage, in your opinion?

Benjamin Horton:   Well I think there are two points to emphasize here: First of all, regarding those carbon dioxide emissions, we've shown through scientific research going through the Paleo record that our global temperatures are very heavily linked to changes in CO2. When CO2 [inaudible 00:05:09] global temperatures go up, and we have a very detailed record of going back approximately around six or 700,000 years from icicles. And we find that during warm periods in our climate, we have carbon dioxide emissions at around 280 ppm by volume. Our current levels are 400 ppm by volume. And that indicates a huge increase that is a result of us burning fossil fuels.

The next question is: Can we control them? We have, as a scientific community, we always have hope regarding climate change, because we have a choice. We are still able to have a choice about high emission scenarios and low emissions scenarios going into the future. The low emission scenarios were agreed by all countries on the planet as part of the Paris Accord, and that was to keep the temperatures, the global mean temperatures below 1.5°C, above the preindustrial values. And that was very important, the scientific community concluded, because that was a level that, if we thought temperatures got above that, we'd get catastrophic changes to the Earth. And when we talk about catastrophic changes, we talk about the loss of the great barrier reef, the largest ecosystem on our planet; the collapse of ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica, causing multimeter rises in sea level.
So that value is not arbitrary. It was based upon scientific data that we must keep below that. And we still have that choice. So despite this current administration wishing to remove ourselves away from the Paris Agreement, what you can hope is that the rest of that the community starts to come together to start to fill in the gap that the U.S. may leave behind.


Dimitri Lascaris:   Let's talk a little bit about what's going on in the U.S.. You're obviously referring to the Trump administration, which appears to have continued to suffer from a large dose of skepticism, with respect to climate science, despite all of the results that you've just discussed. In the United States, according to Forbes magazine, gasoline demand just hit an all-time high, with the greatest weekly U.S. gasoline consumption ever recorded in late July. How important are things such as developments within the United States, in terms of fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, and tn particular, gasoline consumption? How important is that to our ability to remain within the target set forth in the Paris Climate Accord?

B. Horton:   Well obviously increasing gasoline consumption by the U.S. would lead to increasing carbon dioxide levels. Gasoline consumption from personal cause contributes about one fifth of all U.S. emissions. So for every gallon of gas, through the extraction process for the petroleum industry, the all the way through to burning at the tailpipe, you're emitting around 24 pounds of carbon. And then if we look at the whole transport sector alone, so if we combine together cars, and trucks, and rail, and the airplane industry, it's about a third of the carbon dioxide emissions from the U.S., and it's indeed the largest contributing factor. So if the U.S. is going to combat climate change, it must reduce its emissions from gasoline.

But the interesting thing about that, when we think about solutions about climate change, regarding gasoline, we have those solutions. I mean, we can have more fuel-efficient cars. The previous administration, with the car manufacturers, came up with regulations to increase the efficiency of cars, something that this current administration wants to remove, which somehow, as a consumer I find rather nonsensical. Why wouldn't I want a car that was more efficient, and therefore I could get more bang for my bucks? We've also switch to biofuels; biofuels reduce carbon dioxide emissions from our transport sector by about 80%. And then finally, we also have our hybrid or electric cars. We've seen the success of Tesla, and then all our major manufacturers now have electric cars.

So regarding this, although there is this apparent trend, it can be quite easily solved. And if we go to some of our developing world counterparts, there are drastic changes. In the UK, they're going to ban all gasoline and diesel emissions within the next 15 or so years, within our urban areas of the United Kingdom. And there are other such moves within the European Union.

Dimitri Lascaris:   Lastly, I want to just touch on your particular expertise: sea level changes. Given current temperature trends, what level of sea level rise, and assuming that we continue with a business as usual scenario, what level of sea level rise can we anticipate by 2100? And just broadly speaking, what will the major economic impacts of that sea level rise be in the United States, in your view?

Benjamin Horton:   Well sea level rise is a very useful barometer of climate change, because it takes into ... So for the oceans to rise, it takes into account changes in ocean temperature, which cause our oceans to expound. And takes into account air temperature, which converts the water and ice in our ice caps, glaciers, and ice sheets to transfer into our ocean basin, so it's a very important barometer. And the sea level rise rates that we're experiencing now are faster than anything we've seen for the past two and a half thousand years. So we are, very clearly, in an anomalous period. We also know that it's attributable to human activities. Around 50% of the rise that we see, for example, along the U.S. Atlantic Coast is due to human activities, increasing atmospheric temperatures, raising the surface of our oceans.

Now sea level rise, even the smallest amounts has devastating effects. It could contaminate our drinking waters, it can inundate agricultural land, it can affect our ecosystems, and it can make storm surges much more powerful As we move through into the 21st century and beyond, one thing we are certain about is that sea levels will continue to rise, and that they also, the rate of the rise will accelerate. What alarms the climate community, regarding sea level rise, is that if we have a business as usual scenario over climate change, that we're gonna start to affect our sleeping giants, which the Greenland ice sheet and Antarctica. And they hold within them colossal amounts of water. Greenland holds within it about six meters of water. Is it was all to melt, sea levels would go up 6 meters. Antarctica has 65 meters of water within it, over 200 feet, and the warning signs are that these ice sheets are starting to degrade and collapse.

And if you have a business as usual scenario, the latest indications from the climate community is at sea level, by 2100, could rise, just from that ice sheet alone, over one meter. And for the U.S. Atlantic coast, it's very, very worrying. A rise of over one meter from Antarctica, the U.S. Atlantic coast will become a hotspot for that. And the rates of rise we're currently experiencing are around four millimeters per year. The rates of rise towards the end of the century, if we don't do anything about climate change, will be somewhere in the excess of 40 millimeters per year.

Now what are the profound impacts of that? Well if you want to highlight one recent event that devastated the mid-Atlantic shoreline, and that's Hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy was an unusual event, it had an unusual track. It was a slow-moving, large storm, but it was on top of a baseline, and that baseline is sea level. So sea level has been rising on the U.S. Atlantic coast, and we, here in our research group, has been looking at how sea level rise affects how often hurricane Sandy occurred in the past, how often that type of event occurs at the present, and how often it would occur in the future. Prior to the Industrial Revolution, an event like hurricane Sandy occurred approximately one every 500 years. So an event that was very rare; it was six or seven lifetimes before an event of that magnitude.

Because sea level has risen, and it's risen about 30 centimeters since the Industrial Revolution, in and around New York City, that event occurs approximately every 25 years. If we don't do anything about climate change, by 2040, 2050, so within our lifetime, Hurricane Sandy may occur every five years - twice a decade. Hurricane Sandy caused $70 billion of damage to the U.S. Atlantic coast. It affected people's lives, people lost their lives, lost their homes, and that gives you the seriousness of climate change. [inaudible 00:14:23] have hope. So of you don't do anything about climate change, sea levels in and around New York City will rise around 1.3 meters by 2100.

If you do something about climate change, maybe those rises will be 60 or so centimeters. When they're at those rate to rise, we can adapt, and therefore we can continue to live, work, recreate along the coastlines. If you don't do anything about climate change, you're going to have societal change. We're not going to be able to protect our coastlines. People are going to have to migrate, and that, clearly, is the urgency about climate change. Yes, as a community we have hope, but we need our elected officials to act upon the scientific facts.

Dimitri Lascaris:   Well, clearly the costs of inaction are staggering, and hopefully other levels of government in the United States will fill the void under an administration that seems determined to do everything possible to exacerbate the climate crisis. This has been Dimitri Lascaris speaking to Dr. Benjamin Horton about current temperature trends. Thank you very much for joining us today, Dr. Horton.

Benjamin Horton:   Thank you very much, Dimitri.

Dimitri Lascaris:   And this is Dimitri Lascaris for The Real News.

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=19867


Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #993 on: August 28, 2017, 05:45:19 pm »
 

August 28, 2017

Hurricane Harvey Devastates Houston as Scientists Warn of the Perils of Ignoring Climate Change

Millions face flooding as nation's 4th largest city faces another week of rain.



Trancript at link:

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=19877

Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #994 on: August 28, 2017, 08:06:23 pm »
Hurricane Harvey August 25, 2017

How global warming likely made Harvey much worse, explained by a climatologist

Updated by German Lopez@germanrlopezgerman.lopez@vox.com  Aug 28, 2017, 10:30am EDT


Here’s what the science can tell us.


https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2017/8/28/16214268/houston-floods-harvey-global-warming
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #995 on: August 29, 2017, 01:20:57 pm »
August 29, 2017

Harvey just broke an all-time U.S. rainfall record
Tropical Storm Harvey broke the all-time record for the heaviest rainfall from a tropical storm or hurricane in the lower 48 states. That record had been 48 inches, set in Texas in 1978 during Tropical Storm Amelia. According to the National Weather Service in Houston, the new record stands at 49.2 inches, and was set at Mary's Creek, just southeast of Houston.

http://mashable.com/2017/08/25/hurricane-harvey-weather-geek-live-blog/#HBLiQtpLe8qI

Agelbert NOTE: Meanwhile, the Trump Fossil Fuel Tool is flying to Austin to do what he always does on behalf of the polluters that OWN him.

Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #996 on: August 30, 2017, 12:06:50 pm »
Methane Leaks Around North Sea Boreholes Possibly Much More Widespread Than Thought

August 30th, 2017 by James Ayre

SNIPPET:

Methane leaks around oil and gas well boreholes in the North Sea may be much more common than was previously thought, according to new research from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the University of Basel.

Article with pictures:

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/08/30/methane-leaks-around-north-sea-boreholes-possibly-much-widespread-thought/

Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
« Last Edit: August 31, 2017, 02:50:09 pm by AGelbert »
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #998 on: August 31, 2017, 01:49:23 pm »
Pope Francis to World Leaders:  'Listen to the Cry of the Earth'

August 31, 2017

Pope Francis, who has a strong belief in the science of climate change, called upon world leaders on Wednesday to "listen to the cry of the Earth and the cry of the poor, who suffer most because of the unbalanced ecology."

Francis and Patriarch Bartholomew I, the head of the Orthodox Christian Church, will issue a joint message to commemorate the annual "World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation" on Friday, the Associated Press reported.

In 2015, the Pope designated Sept. 1 as "a precious opportunity to renew our personal participation in this vocation as custodians of creation," framing the preservation of the environment as a moral responsibility.

Similarly, Bartholomew—who backed Francis' 2015 encyclical on the environment, Laudato Si—once said:

"There has never been so much turmoil on our planet, but there has never been greater opportunity for communication, cooperation and dialogue. Basic human rights such as access to water, clean air and sufficient food should be available to everyone without distinction or discrimination. We are convinced that we cannot separate our concern for human dignity, human rights or social justice from the concern for ecological preservation and sustainability."

Pope Francis has long pressed for strong climate action. In May, during their meeting at the Vatican, the pontiff gifted President Trump a copy of the climate encyclical right as POTUS considered whether the U.S. should exit from the Paris climate agreement. Trump, a notorious climate skeptic who does not agree with Francis about the global phenomenon, apparently didn't take the Pope's message to heart—he controversially withdrew the U.S. from the Paris accord just a month later.

https://www.ecowatch.com/pope-francis-climate-change-2479496671.html


Quote
2 Explosions Reported at Houston-Area Chemical Plant Damaged by Harvey Floods


https://www.ecowatch.com/explosions-houston-harvey-2479875892.html


Dr. James Hansen: There Is a Clear Link Between Climate Change and Stronger Hurricanes


https://www.ecowatch.com/james-hansen-hurricanes-2479572165.html

Media Reaction: Hurricane Harvey and Climate Change 


https://www.ecowatch.com/hurricane-harvey-media-2479482684.html
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #999 on: August 31, 2017, 02:24:14 pm »
Democracy Now!

August 31, 2017

Naomi Klein's Message to the Media Covering Houston: Now is the Time to Talk About Climate Change


https://www.ecowatch.com/naomi-klein-hurricane-harvey-2479577825.html
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #1000 on: August 31, 2017, 05:57:35 pm »
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #1001 on: August 31, 2017, 09:35:44 pm »



Published on Aug 30, 2017

As storms hit the U.S. and South Asia, investigative journalist Christian Parenti says we have the laws and technology to protect humanity from climate disaster, but we need to rip away the veil of the "free market"
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #1002 on: September 01, 2017, 12:44:55 pm »
Hurricane Harvey Storm totals 8/27/17

Hurricane Harvey Storm totals 8/28/17



Before-and-after visuals  :o  of the massive flooding in Texas

Updated Aug. 31, 2017

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2017/national/harvey-photos-before-after/

Harvey may produce another 2 to 5 inches of rain in parts of Kentucky and the Ohio Valley through Friday night, which may trigger flash flooding in some spots, though of course, nothing as extreme as we saw in Texas the last several days.

Additional Rainfall Outlook

In addition to the flood threat, a few tornadoes could spin up into Friday in the Carolinas and the central Appalachians.

Harvey's Recap: A Truly Historic Hurricane

Below is a comprehensive look back at the history of Harvey, beginning with an overview of its journey, followed by recaps of its landfall impacts and catastrophic flooding.

Overview

Harvey roots can be traced back to a tropical wave that emerged from the African coast in early August.

That disturbance finally formed into Tropical Storm Harvey east of the Lesser Antilles on Aug. 17. Those islands experienced locally heavy rain and gusty winds as Harvey passed through.

A couple of days later, Harvey succumbed to dry air and unfavorable winds aloft in the eastern Caribbean, and the National Hurricane Center ceased advisories on Aug. 19. 


The remnants of Harvey continued to push northwest for several days and eventually crossed Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Once its remnants moved back over water in the southwest Gulf of Mexico, Harvey quickly reformed into a tropical depression on Aug. 23.

In just 56 hours, Harvey grew from a regenerated tropical depression over the Gulf of Mexico into a Category 4 hurricane as it made landfall near the Texas Gulf Coast late on Aug. 25.

(MORE: Why Harvey Rapidly Intensified)

Harvey's center of circulation stalled over south Texas on Aug. 26 and then meandered slowly east into the Gulf of Mexico before making a final landfall near Cameron, Louisiana, on Aug. 30.

Still a named storm 117 hours after landfall, Harvey was the longest a Texas landfalling hurricane remained a named storm after landfall on record, according to Colorado State University tropical scientist Dr. Phil Klotzbach.

It was the slow movement from Aug. 26-30 that led to the catastrophic flooding that was observed in southeast Texas.

Harvey's Category 4 Landfall

Harvey made landfall on the evening of Aug. 25 near Rockport, a town of less than 10,000 people and about 30 miles up the Texas coast from Corpus Christi. Maximum sustained winds in Harvey's eyewall were 130 mph at that time, making it a Category 4.

Harvey was the nation's first major (Category 3 or stronger) hurricane landfall since Hurricane Wilma struck South Florida in October 2005, an almost 12-year run.


Wind gusts from Harvey near its landfall point topped 100 mph in many locations, leading to widespread destruction of homes and buildings.

Top Wind Gust Reports

Port Aransas: 132 mph, sustained to 110 mph
Near Copano Village: 125 mph
Near Lamar: 110 mph
Rockport: 108 mph
Near Taft: 90 mph
Near Magnolia Beach: 79 mph
Palacios: 69 mph
Corpus Christi Int'l Airport: 63 mph
Austin Bergstrom Int'l Airport: 52 mph
Pounding waves on top of Harvey's storm surge also inundated parts of the Texas Coastal Bend, resulting in damage in some areas.

The maximum observed water level rise at Harvey's landfall point was 6.71 feet at Port Lavaca.

Harvey was the strongest landfall in this area, known as the Texas Coastal Bend, since Hurricane Carla, in September 1961.

The only other Category 4 landfall of record near the Texas Coastal Bend was the infamous Indianola hurricane of August 1886, which devastated the town of Indianola just 11 years after another Category 3 hurricane, eventually turning the former bustling port into a ghost town.

Catastrophic, Record Flooding in Southeast Texas

Harvey's extreme slow movement Aug. 26-30 kept a fire hose of moisture pointed into southeast Texas and Louisiana for days, resulting in catastrophic flooding.

Numerous flash flood emergencies were issued for the Houston and Beaumont, Texas, metropolitan areas, and for Bastrop County and nearby communities.

The areal coverage of locations picking up at least 20 inches of rain was greater than the state of West Virginia, while the 40-inch-plus zone was larger than Delaware.

The top rainfall total was a preliminary 51.88 inches near Highlands, Texas, at the Cedar Bayou rain gauge.

Pending final confirmation, this rainfall total would be the heaviest from any tropical cyclone in the continental U.S. in records dating to 1950, topping the 48-inch storm total in Medina, Texas, from Tropical Storm Amelia in 1978, according to research by NOAA/WPC meteorologist David Roth.

Top Rainfall Reports

51.88 inches on Cedar Bayou near Highlands, Texas (Preliminary Lower 48 tropical cyclone record)
49.40 inches on Clear Creek at Interstate 45 near League City, Texas (Preliminary Lower 48 tropical cyclone record)
49.32 inches on Mary's Creek near Friendswood (Preliminary Lower 48 tropical cyclone record)
49.23 inches near Dayton (Preliminary Lower 48 tropical cyclone record)
49.20 inches on Mary's Creek at Winding Road (Preliminary Lower 48 tropical cyclone record)
47.35 inches in Beaumont/Port Arthur, Texas
45.74 inches near Pasadena
44.91 inches near South Houston
43.38 inches at the NWS forecast office in Houston (League City)
37.01 inches at Houston Hobby Airport
31.26 inches at Houston Bush Intercontinental Airport
22.84 inches in Galveston
21.88 inches in Smithville
19.64 inches in College Station
15.60 inches near Victoria
15.41 inches near Lake Charles, Louisiana
12.33 inches near Hackberry, Louisiana
9.96 inches near Watson, Arkansas
8.27 inches near Gautier, Mississippi
7.95 inches at Pensacola Regional Airport, Florida
5.73 inches near Plano, Kentucky

Houston's Bush Intercontinental Airport crushed its record-wettest calendar day Sunday by over 5 inches, picking up 16.07 inches of rain, just under the five-day total of 16.48 inches from Tropical Storm Allison in 2001. Houston's Hobby Airport also crushed a two-day rainfall record by almost 8 inches, picking up 23.06 inches of rain Aug. 26-27.

Houston had two of its five heaviest calendar-day rainfalls from Harvey.

The average rainfall within the Harris County Emergency Management network exceeded that of Tropical Storm Allison (2001) in almost half of the time (2 to 3 days versus 5 days). The Harris County Flood Control District estimated one trillion gallons of water was dumped on the county alone in four days.

Harvey's flooding has caused one of the worst weather disasters in U.S. history, with a price tag that will amount to billions of dollars. The HCFCD estimated 70 percent of Harris County was flooded by at least 1.5 feet of water, with an estimated 136,000 flooded structures in the county alone, as of August 31.

Thousands of water rescues occurred in the Houston metro area as many homes and businesses were swamped by floodwaters.

Houston wasn't the only location to suffer disastrous flooding.

Jack Brooks Regional Airport near Port Arthur, Texas, picked up a staggering 26.03 inches of rain on Aug. 29 alone, more than doubling the previous calendar-day rainfall record in Beaumont-Port Arthur set over 94 years ago. Its storm total from Aug. 26-30 was an incredible 47.35 inches of rain, almost 25 inches greater than its previous record four-day rain record set in September 1980.

The resultant flooding swamped a storm shelter in Port Arthur, prompting evacuees to be moved to another shelter.

Interstate 10 between Beaumont and Winnie, Texas, was overtaken by the floodwaters, as well.

Serious flooding also occurred southwest of Houston along the Brazos, Colorado and Guadalupe Rivers.

In total, 19 National Weather Service river gauges had observed record flooding as of Aug. 31.


This wasn't just a story in Texas and Louisiana, either. According to hurricane researcher Brenden Moses, Harvey was among the wettest tropical cyclones on record in Kentucky, Tennessee and Arkansas.

Harvey has also spawned several brief tornadoes in southeast Texas and southern Louisiana.

In the southwest suburb of Missouri City, more than 50 homes were damaged in the Sienna Plantation neighborhood.

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

https://www.wunderground.com/news/tropical-storm-harvey-forecast-texas-louisiana-arkansas

Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #1003 on: September 01, 2017, 01:15:27 pm »
Harvey's Last Day of Soaking Rain, Threat for Flash Flooding in the Ohio Valley

September 1, 2017

Harvey long-lived odyssey of rain is in its final chapter, spreading heavy rain into the Ohio Valley Friday, potentially triggering additional flash flooding.

Although rain has come to an end in flood-ravaged southeast Texas, rivers will remain high for days to come as recovery efforts continue.

https://www.wunderground.com/news/tropical-storm-harvey-forecast-texas-louisiana-arkansas
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8052
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Re: Global Warming is WITH US
« Reply #1004 on: September 01, 2017, 01:56:14 pm »

Future Hurricanes Will Be Worse Than Harvey, Science Says

August 31, 2017 by Bloomberg

SNIPPET:

By Eric Roston (Bloomberg) — How powerful would Hurricane Harvey have been in 1880? How much stronger might it be in 2100?

A single Hurricane Harvey has been more than anyone can bear. But to better prepare cities for future storms, researchers are preparing to re-watch Harvey thousands of times. They’ve already been studying earlier storms, and their conclusions don’t bode well for the decades to come.

http://gcaptain.com/future-hurricanes-will-worse-harvey-science-says/
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
10 Replies
539 Views
Last post March 07, 2016, 08:06:00 am
by trianglejohn
1 Replies
223 Views
Last post July 21, 2014, 10:29:36 pm
by AGelbert

+-Recent Topics

Corporate Fascist Corruption of Christianity by AGelbert
Today at 05:16:20 pm

Global Warming is WITH US by AGelbert
November 18, 2017, 02:59:10 pm

Mechanisms of Prejudice: Hidden and Not Hidden by AGelbert
November 18, 2017, 02:54:49 pm

Corruption in Government by AGelbert
November 18, 2017, 02:35:13 pm

Electric Vehicles by AGelbert
November 17, 2017, 09:53:40 pm

Pollution by AGelbert
November 17, 2017, 11:51:50 am

Fossil Fuel Profits Getting Eaten Alive by Renewable Energy! by AGelbert
November 17, 2017, 11:35:55 am

Defending Wildlife by AGelbert
November 16, 2017, 03:11:24 pm

Resisting Brainwashing Propaganda by AGelbert
November 16, 2017, 02:17:16 pm

Historical Documentaries by AGelbert
November 15, 2017, 11:29:18 pm

Free Web Hit Counter By CSS HTML Tutorial