+- +-

+-User

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

+-Stats ezBlock

Members
Total Members: 39
Latest: robbrogers
New This Month: 0
New This Week: 0
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 7800
Total Topics: 220
Most Online Today: 3
Most Online Ever: 48
(June 03, 2014, 03:09:30 am)
Users Online
Members: 0
Guests: 0
Total: 0

Author Topic: Strengthening the Immune System to More Effectively Fight Infection  (Read 916 times)

0 Members and 0 Guests are viewing this topic.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences

Olive tree leaves





Olive tree branch end with leaves, flower buds, a flower and a friendly ant.  ;D










When the weather changes, opportunistic bacteria attack people with weak immune systems
Treating respiratory tract infections in the age of resistance

by Jodi Gelfand, PA

Antimicrobial resistance is an issue well known to the medical community at large. It is, however, of paramount importance within the realm of holistic medicine; in addition to having the potential to further aggravate resistance to various antibiotics, resistance has numerous potential neurological and gastroenterological ramifications.

Initially confined to hospitals, antimicrobial resistance is becoming a common problem in primary care settings.

As upper respiratory infections move down through the respiratory tract, they can progress from the common cold to bronchitis and finally, pneumonia. Three specific bacteria are almost exclusively responsible for all of the bacterial components of these infections: Streptococcus. pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenza and Moroxella catarrhalis.

 These same three bacteria are responsible for most throat, ear, tonsil and sinus infections. The consequences of increasing drug resistance are far reaching since bacterial infections of the lower respiratory tract are the major cause of death  from  infectious disease in the United States  :o (fn1)

Certain upper respiratory infections can be self-limited, even when primarily bacterial in origin. Additionally, many of these infections may be viral in origin in which case, treatment with antibiotics is superfluous. Judicious use of antibiotics and careful selection of appropriate medications (a narrow spectrum drug), when they are in fact indicated, can help ameliorate resistance.

Even exacerbations of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AECB) are usually viral in origin. In cases where the infection is indeed primarily bacterial, it usually resolves without the traditional course of antibiotic therapy. Patients who have received antibiotics in the past for acute bronchitis may insist on the same prescription, not realizing that the previous episode would have run its course, often in about 14 days, without the drug. (Fn2) However, in the case of elderly patients, diabetics, smokers or patients with COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease), antibiotic therapy is usually indicated.

Here are some guidelines that can be helpful in determining appropriate treatment protocols:

- When possible, obtain a culture before treating. Resist routine requests for antibiotics unless the infection is longstanding.

- Use narrow-spectrum antibiotics

- Implement careful hand-washing protocols ( most of these bacteria are transmitted via skin contact, not via inhalant mechanisms)


- Our focus, however, is largely on prevention. Particularly at this time of year, when the weather changes precipitously from day to day, enhancing the immune system can obviate the need for treatment or at least lessen the severity of an infection. Typically, we add some of the following immune enhancing supplements to Vitamin C, EPA/DHA and Foundation Formula:

Olive Leaf Extract: Elenolic acid is an extract from olive leaves that can act as a potent bactericidal agent it can kill pathogenic microbes. It works by interfering with the pathogenic amino acid sequences by preventing them from reproducing. (It also may have anti-viral properties).

Transfer Factor: Bovine colostrum extract.

Culturelle: Lactobacillus GG helps control overgrowth of harmful bacteria by increasing the relative number of normal intestinal flora. This specific lactobacillus adheres to the intestinal tract and can sustain its growth there for up to 5 days. Healthy intestinal flora can provide a physiologic barrier that helps prevent the spread of pathogens into the bloodstream.

ARA-6: Arabinogalactans from the western larch tree are high-molecular weight polysaccharides (sugars) capable of upregulating critical aspects of the immune system. It can be particularly effective prophylaxis for children with chronic upper respiratory infections.

Footnote 1) Treating Respiratory Tract Infections in the Age of Resistance, JAAPA Supplement, fall, 2001, p. 3.

Footnote 2) ibid. p.10.

http://www.drhoffman.com/page.cfm/123
« Last Edit: November 02, 2013, 07:34:08 pm by AGelbert »
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
What Happens in the Brain During Sleep?


In 2013, studies proved for the first time that sleep is biologically fundamentally necessary for animals to clear away neurotoxic waste that builds up in the brain while awake. Research also shows that failing to adequately clear away these toxins plays a significant role in developing certain brain disorders.

The system through which the cleanup takes place is called the glymphatic system and research has shown that it is 10 times more active while an animal is sleeping.

;D

More about sleep:

•The record holder for going the longest without sleep held out for almost 19 days.

•Extreme sleep deprivation leads to hallucinations, paranoia, and blurred vision, as well as memory and concentration lapses.

•The brain commits memories from short-term to long-term storage while sleeping.

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-happens-in-the-brain-during-sleep.htm

And OF COURSE, a healthy amount of sleep is VITAL for maintaining a strong immune system. 
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Japanese knotweed
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2013, 02:06:39 am »
Japanese knotweed has resveratrol to fight degenerative diseases but has other medicinal too.  ;D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uf3N0biKrjQ&feature=player_embedded


The Cure Is Never Far Away

 It is said that in nature, the cure is never far away from the injury. For example if you are bitten by a snake, there will be some plant nearby to counter the poison. This was of course much more relevant when people knew what to look for right there in the forest!

 Japanese knotweed, an invasive plant that grows all over the US, may be one of the most important plants in treating symptoms of Lyme disease. Interestingly, it has become even more invasive in the northeast US, in tandem with the rise of Lyme disease.

 The compounds found in the root have been used for thousands of years in Far East medicine. The most notable one is resveratrol, an anti-oxidant credited with preventing heart disease, also found in red wine.

 Now it's widely sought after in the West. Herbalist / acupuncturist Timothy Scott, author of "Invasive Plant Medicine The Ecological Benefits and Healing Abilities of Invasives" shares his enthusiasm and knowledge of the plant here.

 It is always a good idea to consult a specialist before any new herbal regimen. Knotweed should not be taken in pregnancy except in small doses and should not be used with other blood thinners.

 --Bibi Farber
- See more at: http://www.nextworldtv.com/videos/health-and-wellness/invasive-plant-medicine.html#sthash.NhwSyolC.dpuf
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

Surly1

  • Administrator
  • Jr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 85
    • View Profile
Terrific thread, AG.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Surly, Than you sir.  ;D
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
5 Places to Sneak Hemp Into Your Diet

Magda Rod

November 17, 2013

Hemp is on my list of top superfoods. Hemp is high in protein and healthy fats, and is very low in cholesterol and sodium. It is also a good source of zinc, and a very good source of magnesium. Hemp contains all the essential amino acids and essential fatty acids necessary to maintain healthy human life. No other single plant source has the essential amino acids in such an easily digestible form, nor has the essential fatty acids in as perfect a ratio to meet human nutritional needs. Available in concentrated protein, shelled seeds, or oil, there are unlimited ways to include hemp in your everyday diet. I consume it just about every day in one form or another. Here are my top 5 ways to eat hemp:

1. Salad

Adding raw organic hemp seeds to any salad gives it a nutritional as well as flavor boost. Try my favorite Creamy Kale Salad Recipe. Also consider switching your salad oil to hemp oil instead of whatever you’re using now.

2. Smoothies

Hemp is a prime plant based protein alternative to whey, which can acidify the body and create extra strain on your kidneys. You can use concentrated hemp protein or for a creamier smoothie use the shelled hemp seeds. Here’s my favorite smoothie recipe.

3. Breakfast

Many people start their day with a bowl of  heart healthy oatmeal. Sprinkle in a couple tablespoons of hemp seeds to up the nutritional value even more, and add a subtle nutty taste. You can also sprinkle hemp seeds in yogurt or any other breakfast cereal.

4. Dairy Substitute/Ice Cream/Milk

Did you know you can easily make your own raw hemp milk at home? Skip the cartons that have the questionable added carrageenan, and make your own by blending 2-3 tablespoons of raw organic hemp seeds with 4-8 ounces of water. The water to seeds ratio is for you to decide, based on if you prefer a thinner milk, or thicker cream (to replace that unhealthy half and half). Add a sprinkle of cinnamon and a few drops of liquid stevia and vanilla to bring the taste closer to a store bought brand. Make sure to blend the mixture on high for 45 seconds to a minute, preferably with a high speed blender, to fully blend the seeds for a smooth finish. If it’s still too lumpy for you, strain it through cheese cloth or a nut milk bag.You can try adding flax seeds (1/2-1 tablespoon) and even some soaked brown rice. A good rule of thumb to make a quart of milk is 1 cup hemp seeds to 4 parts water. Experiment and see what mixture and consistency you personally like. Store in a mason jar and make fresh every few days and shake it up before pouring. If you’re lucky enough to live in the vicinity of Omega Creamery’s limited distribution area like I am, you can enjoy  not only their hemp milk but also their low glycemic vegan superfood ice cream!

5. Pesto


That’s right! You can make a superfood vegan pesto with hemp seeds! Here’s the recipe. I add this to gluten free pasta, use it as a pizza base instead of tomato sauce, or spread it on flax crackers.

Adding more hemp to your diet will not only improve your health, but can help create more demand for this sustainable crop which requires no fertilizers or pesticides, and help the call for (re)legalization. The hemp plant (Cannabis sativa) is one of the earliest known cultivated crops, and it has many uses including textiles, fiber, wood, plastic and fuel alternatives. And no, it won’t get you high or make you test positive for drugs, but it will make you and our precious planet a whole lot healthier.


Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/5-places-to-sneak-hemp-into-your-diet.html#ixzz2l3lGBvi0
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Ahhh-- couldn't help myself.

The Historical Uses of Silver
While silver's importance as a bactericide has been documented only since the late 1800s, Silver has been reported to have therapeutic value throughout the ages.

Early records indicate that the Phoenicians used silver vessels to keep water, wine and vinegar pure during their long voyages. The ancient Greeks discovered the health benefits of silver when they noted that in battle the upper class, who had silver canteens, never got dysentery but the regular troops often did. Consequently, they also lined their eating and drinking vessels with silver, as did many other cultures throughout the world.

Herodotus (79 A.D.) wrote that Cyrus the Great, King of Persia (550-529 B.C.), a man of vision who established a board of health and a medical dispensary for his citizens, had water drawn from a special stream, had it boiled and placed in silver vessels. These vessels of water were placed on four wheeled wagons drawn by mules, to accompany the king where ever he went. Around 400 B.C., Hippocrates, the "Father of Medicine," taught that silver healed wounds and controlled disease".

The Romans used silver nitrate therapeutically, and in 69 B.C it was described in the contemporary Roman pharmacopoeia. Pliny the Elder, in his survey of the world's knowledge, Natural History (78 A.D.), states that the slag of silver "... has healing properties as an ingredient in plasters, being extremely effective in causing wounds to close up...".

The popularity of medicinal silver rose from 702 A.D. through 980 A.D. throughout the Middle East where it was widely used and esteemed for blood purification, heart conditions, and controlling halitosis. Paracelsus (circa 1520) extensively incorporated silver medicinally and speaks of the virtues of silver as a healing substance in his hermetic and alchemical writings.

Through the centuries, royal households carried on the practice of storing their provisions in silver containers. Privileged family members used silver eating utensils; had their meals served on silver plates and their drinks served in silver cups. It is believed that this is one reason the upper class did not succumb to the many plagues which almost wiped out villages. Churches did, and still do, use cups made of silver for communion, where one goblet is passed from person to person.

Interestingly, the term “Blue Blood”, used to indicate royalty, arises from the reportedly bluish tinge of the skin of royal family members, caused by the minute traces of pure metallic silver they regularly consumed from the use of silver utensils. It is also interesting to note that the expression, "born with a silver spoon in his mouth", is not a reference to wealth, but to health. In the early 18th century, babies who were fed with silver spoons were healthier than those fed with spoons made from other metals, and silver pacifiers found wide use in America because of their beneficial health effects.

American pioneers found that a silver dollar put in a jug of milk would delay spoilage. They also found that if they kept their silverware "hidden" in their water barrel the water would not go bad. Therefore, pioneers moving west put silver and copper coins in their water barrels to keep them clean.

During the wars with Napoleon, the armies of Tsar Alexander used water casks lined with silver to store clean drinking water from rivers and streams. This practice by the Imperial Russian army was common through World War I and continued to be incorporated by some units in the Soviet Army during World War II.

Through the middle-ages right up to the early part of the 20th century, pure silver wire was inserted into battle wounds and hunting accident wounds to keep the wound clean of infection and accelerate healing.

It was not until the late 1800's that Western scientists were able to prove what had been known in Eastern medicine for thousands of years...that silver was a proven germ fighter! Several physicians discovered the antibacterial qualities of silver and applied them to their practice of medicine. They used silver nitrate successfully in the treatment of skin ulcers, compound fractures and draining puss wounds. In 1881, the German obstetrician, Dr. F. Crede, began to administer 1% silver nitrate solution in the eyes of newborn infants. This virtually eliminated the incidence of disease causing blindness in newborns, such as gonorrheal ophthalmia. This technique has been used effectively up to the present.

In 1901, a Prussian chemist named Hille and Albert Coombs Barnes discovered a method of preparing a true colloid by combining a vegetable product with a silver compound and patented it as Argyrol, the only non-toxic antibiotic available at the time.

By the turn of the century, scientists had discovered that the body's most important fluids were colloidal in nature. Upon this discovery, the endless possibilities for the use of colloids in medicine were recognized. As a result, a silver solution known as Colloidal Silver became widely used in medicine. The first electro-colloidal silver was produced in 1924 and became widely used in medicine as one of the mainstays of anti-microbial treatment. It proved to be enormously effective against infectious organisms and extremely safe to use, without the negative side effects associated with many drugs.

In 1910, Dr Henry Crooks, a pioneer in colloidal chemistry, (Use of Colloids in Health-Disease) wrote that: "… certain metals, when in a colloidal state, have a highly germicidal action but are quite harmless to human beings...it may be applied in a much more concentrated form and with better results... no microbe is known that is not killed by this colloid in laboratory experiments in six minutes, [and] the concentration of the [silver] does not exceed twenty-five parts per million.”
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences

Calcium supplements from eggshells are not just good for dogs!  ;D


Eggshell calcium in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

Rovenský J, Stancíková M, Masaryk P, Svík K, Istok R.

Author information
Abstract

In this paper the most significant biological and clinical aspects of a biopreparation made of chicken eggshells are reviewed.

Eggshell powder is a natural source of calcium and other elements (e.g. strontium and fluorine) which may have a positive effect on bone metabolism. Experimental and clinical studies performed to date have shown a number of positive properties of eggshell powder, such as antirachitic effects in rats and humans.

A positive effect was observed on bone density in animal models of postmenopausal osteoporosis in ovariectomized female rats. In vitro eggshell powder stimulates chondrocyte differentiation and cartilage growth.

Clinical studies in postmenopausal women and women with senile osteoporosis showed that eggshell powder reduces pain and osteoresorption and increases mobility and bone density or arrests its loss.

The bioavailability of calcium from this source, as tested in piglets, was similar or better than that of food grade purified calcium carbonate.

Clinical and experimental studies showed that eggshell powder has positive effects on bone and cartilage and that it is suitable in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15018022

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11281164



How to Make Eggshell Calcium

High-quality eggshells contain 27 essential microelements but they’re mostly composed of calcium carbonate, a form and structure that’s very similar to our bones and teeth.

Ingredients and equipment: 1 carton of organic pastured chicken eggs

If you can get fresh from the farm, even better and try to get eggs from chickens that don’t eat soy. Pay the extra price since this will serve as a supplement and is much cheaper than buying calcium tablets. Confused how to find or know if eggs are good quality? Here’s a tip… the thicker the shell, the more nutrients.

 I don’t have a good source close to where I live, so I order mine from Tropical Traditions and their farms in Wisconsin. I love theirs because they are SOY-FREE, something very hard to find in store bought, even organic eggs.

You will also need: 1 stock pot, 1 coffee grinder,  1 small Mason jar with secure and clean lid

Directions Use up your eggs as you normally would, keeping the shell in the carton to make your supplement When you have your dozen shells, rinse them well in water. Remove any whites that might be stuck but don’t remove membrane as these have extra nutrients.

Fill a stock pot with approximately 6 cups of filtered water and bring to a boil. Carefully put your eggshells into water. (This will kill any harmful pathogens) Let cook for 10 minutes. Drain shells.

Spread the shells on glass or stainless steel baking sheet and let dry overnight. In the morning, put in a 200 degree (Fahrenheit) oven for about 10 minutes to completely dry out.

Once completed, put a few shells into a coffee grinder and run until they are pulverized into a granular form. Continue until all of your shells are powder. Store in a tightly sealed Mason jar in the cupboard away from heat or moisture.

How to Consume 1 tsp. contains approximately 800-1,000 mg. of calcium. Consume by mixing in a small amount of water with a meal. Consume 3/4 to 1 tsp daily, divided in 3 servings with meals. Don’t consume more than 1 tsp a day as it can irritate sensitive digestive tracks. 

See more at: http://mamanatural.com/how-to-make-eggshell-calcium/#sthash.d3eQWiYn.dpuf




Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Light Lowers Blood Pressure
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2014, 12:34:42 am »
Light Lowers Blood Pressure

UVA exposure reduces human blood pressure by releasing nitric oxide metabolites from storage in the skin.

By Tracy Vence | January 20, 2014

For years, researchers have reported predictable seasonal variations in human blood pressure. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure tend to be greatest during the winter months and lowest in the summer. Many have attributed this variation to changes in temperature, but according to a study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology today (January 20), variations in sun exposure may be the answer.

“This study . . . provides suggestive evidence that skin-derived NO metabolites may have a role in modulation of blood pressure upon UV exposure,” Thomas Michel, a professor of medicine and biochemistry at Harvard Medical School who was not involved in the work, told The Scientist in an e-mail.

The University of Southampton’s Martin Feelisch and his colleagues first began to suspect that sunlight could affect blood pressure nearly two decades ago. At that time, the researchers were investigating the vasodilative effects of nitric oxide (NO), a signaling molecule that circulates in the bloodstream at low concentrations, typically by hitching a ride on proteins, like albumin or hemoglobin.

It was more than 10 years ago that Feelisch and his team first exposed healthy individuals to short periods of high-intensity sunlight, and observed subsequent decreases in circulating nitrate and increases in nitrite, both metabolites of NO. The researchers also recorded significant reductions in blood pressure. At that time, “metabolites of NO were long considered to be biologically inert,” said Feelisch. “We started to look at the possibility to bioactivate this molecule.”

Meanwhile, other groups were reporting reductions in blood pressure as a result of dietary nitrate supplementation, which Feelisch and his colleagues had not controlled for. Temperature was another potential confounding variable. Were the effects Feelisch and his colleagues observed due to light exposure or elevated temperatures? How might dietary nitrate come into play?

In 2009, a team led by the University of Edinburgh’s Richard Weller showed that human skin and the dermal vasculature contain significant stores of NO—much more than can be found circulating in the blood—and that these stores could be mobilized by UVA (long-wave UV) irradiation.

For the present study, Feelisch, Weller, and their colleagues investigated the effects of UVA exposure—equivalent to 30 minutes of sun exposure at noon on a clear day in Southern Europe—on 24 healthy volunteers, controlling for both temperature and dietary nitrate. The researchers found plasma nitrate and nitrite changes, as well as reductions in blood pressure, that were consistent with the release of NO from skin storage. “These observations support a mechanism for the modulation of systemic NO bioactivity and a possible role of the skin in cardiovascular homeostasis,” he and his colleagues wrote.

“The strength of this study is the methodology,” said the Karolinska Institutet’s Eddie Weitzberg, a professor of physiology and pharmacology who was not involved in the work. “It is well-performed with adequate control experiments.”

One lingering question is the source of the cutaneous NO stores. Another is how, exactly, NO metabolites are released into the bloodstream. “From a mechanistic angle, it’s important to understand what contributes to determining the concentration of this storage material in the skin, and whether there is anything [else] that would facilitate translocation from the skin to the circulation,” said Feelisch. “It’s a complete black box at the moment.”

Clinically speaking, tests to evaluate blood pressure response to repeated UVA exposure with respect the age, gender, and disease states—such as hypertension—are needed. But if the blood pressure-reducing effects of UVA light hold up in larger trials, Feelisch suggested that a reevaluation of the risks and benefits associated with sun exposure might be in order. “Avoidance of sunlight may be a new risk factor for cardiovascular disease that’s never been on the map,” he said.

Still, this work is early-stage. For now, Michel said, “I certainly wouldn’t take these findings as any mitigation against the well-founded recommendation by dermatologists to avoid excessive sun exposure.”

D. Liu et al., “UVA irradiation of human skin vasodilates arterial vasculature and lowers blood pressure independently of nitric oxide synthase,” Journal of Investigative Dermatology, doi: 10.1038/jid.2014.27, 2014.

http://www.the-scientist.com//?articles.view/articleNo/38915/title/Light-Lowers-Blood-Pressure/
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Compassion fatigue
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2014, 03:53:21 pm »
Compassion fatigue -- a.k.a. caregiver burnout -- is what happens when a well-intentioned caregiver crosses a hard-to-see line from One-Who-Helps to One-Who-Needs-Help. And it can happen to anyone. It happens precisely because you care so much.

Are you at risk of caring "too much"? Here are ten warning signs:

1.You use words like "always" and "never" with regard to caregiving.
 Beware falling into absolutes: "I promised Mom we'd never put her in a nursing home." "I'm sorry I can't go to lunch because I always feed Sam by myself."

Being overly rigid can put you at risk for burnout.


2.Your friends seem to have stopped calling.
You may be feeling isolated or annoyed that your old circle no longer seems to check up on you and how you're faring. But is it possible that you've turned them down so often because of your caregiving duties, or that caregiving concerns so dominate your life and conversation, that they got the message you're just not interested in them?

A social life is a two-way street.


3.The last time you felt happy was. . . uh. . . um. . . let's see. . . Nobody ever said looking after a sick or aging loved one was a romp in a field of wildflowers. But if your everyday life has lost even its grace notes, so that you find no pleasure in it, you're at risk.

Every day needs at least one happy petal or two.


4.Everyone assumes you'll step forward; nobody asks.

 Have you become the default go-to girl (or guy) in your family? When the sick person is your spouse, this is logical. (Even then, you need a support system to pitch in.) But it's a different matter when the family member being cared for is a parent, grandparent, or other relative -- and the entire burden of responsibility seems to have settled on your shoulders whether you've volunteered or not.

As caregiving expert Carol O'Dell is fond of saying, "People take as much advantage of you as you let them."


5.You're overweight or out of shape.
 True, it may not be your caregiving that's to blame. We could sit around and make a long list of culprits for poor health that includes everything from our car culture to a conspiracy of corn syrup to unfortunate genes. But the fact remains that poor self-care is a big red flag for caregiver burnout. Being selflessly focused on others by definition means you're not focused on yourself. And yet you need to be the #1 person you look after, in order to be shipshape (or at least functional!) to look after others.

If you don't like what you see when you look in the mirror (or sit listening to the doctor's concern in the exam room), give yourself permission to be selfish.


6.You can't remember the last time you took a vacation.
Vacations are really hard when you have a disabled or impaired person to consider. And not being able to even remember the last break you had is a sure sign you're due for one. It doesn't have to be three weeks in France. Start small if you must: a simple overnight at a friend's house or a local B&B. Just do something.

To stop caregiving stress, stop caregiving sometimes.


7.All conversations turn to caregiving.

 Maybe you remember when your kids were babies and you'd hire a babysitter -- and proceed to talk about the kids all evening? Not a great idea. Or worse, you call home to check up! If every conversation with your partner or other family members concerns one subject, it's a warning sign that topic is monopolizing your life.

Diversify!


8.You have no hobbies.

 You say you have no time for hobbies? Your hobby doesn't have to be a conventional one like stamp-collecting or bird-watching. It just needs to be an outlet away from caregiving. Reading trashy novels uninterrupted, taking up knitting, joining a book club, taking adult ed courses, being a matinee-movie addict, or enjoying your children and grandchildren all count, too "“ anything that takes you away from caregiving for bursts of time.

Bonus points if it takes you out of the house, too.


9.You can't sleep through the night.

 Two common causes: You're up tending to a sick person (or Alzheimer's wanderer, or someone else who gets by on just a few hours of sleep a night) or you're sick with stress or a physical problem yourself. A sleepless night or two go with the territory of caregiving -- but if it's become your lifestyle, it's a problem you need to correct.

Sleep isn't optional!


10.You dread waking up in the morning.

 We all have this experience, usually when we're in the midst of a health crisis that seems like a bad dream (but isn't). Health nightmares can go on for years, unfortunately. But when the crisis has passed and you've sunk into a new routine "“ and you still feel heavy-hearted and hopeless, your body is crying out for you to enlist some support.


Nobody "“ not even the most well-intentioned, big-hearted, and selfless among us -- is meant to endure a tough situation all alone, day after day, year after year.


If three or more of these warning signs are flashing for you, what can you do? Start here:


Use the Caring.com local senior care directory to free up time for you.
Find a support group of like-situationed others to vent to.

Congratulate yourself for having taken the first step toward improving the situation: Realizing the problem, and deciding you're worth a fix.

http://www.caring.com/articles/when-you-care-too-much?utm_content=20140227&utm_campaign=website&utm_source=suggests&utm_medium=email
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpuU2qLuylU&feature=player_embedded

By Dr. Mercola


Of all the foods Mother Nature provides, few foods offer more of a “botanical bonanza” for your health than garlic. Garlic is a bulbous root closely related to the onion, mentioned in historical documents dating back 5,000 years—before its fame wafted into the rest of the known world.

Speaking of wafting, garlic’s nickname “stinking rose” is well-deserved due to its undeniably pungent aroma that some find objectionable, but others find intoxicating.

Numerous studies show garlic’s amazing health potential in nearly every area of your body, from clogged arteries to gangrene to preventing insect bites and ear infections. There is even evidence that garlic is able to help slow your aging process. When it comes to this magical bulb, what’s not to love?


Garlic Epitomizes a ‘Heart Healthy Food’  ;D



Like so many other complex plant foods, garlic contains a wide range of phytocompounds that act together to produce a wide variety of responses in your body. Garlic is rich in manganese, calcium, phosphorus, selenium, and vitamins B6 and C, so it’s beneficial for your bones as well as your thyroid.

Garlic also helps your body cleanse itself of heavy metals, such as lead, mercury, cadmium, and arsenic.1 Green Med Info has also assembled a list of studies demonstrating garlic's positive effects for more than 150 different diseases.2 In general, its benefits fall into four main categories:
1.Reducing inflammation (reduces risk of osteoarthritis as mentioned in the video above)
2.Boosting immune function (antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiparasitic properties)
3.Improving cardiovascular health and circulation (protects against clotting, retards plaque, improves lipids, and reduces blood pressure)
4.Toxic to 14 kinds of cancer cells (including brain, lung, breast, and pancreatic)

The fact that garlic is so effective in fighting multiple types of cancer is probably related to its potent antioxidant effects. Garlic contains the precursors to allicin—a compound I’ll be discussing in detail shortly. Allicin is one of the most potent antioxidants from the plant kingdom.

In fact, researchers have determined that sulfenic acid, produced during the rapid decomposition of allicin, reacts with and neutralizes free radicals faster than any other known compound—it’s almost instantaneous when the two molecules meet. And as an anti-infective, garlic has been demonstrated to kill everything from candida to herpes, MRSA, drug-resistant tuberculosis, and even HIV.

Garlic’s Secret Weapon: Allicin


Researchers have found that allicin is an effective natural "antibiotic" that can eradicate even antibiotic-resistant bugs. An added benefit is that the bacteria appear incapable of developing a resistance to the compound. However, the garlic must be fresh because the active agent is destroyed in less than an hour after smashing the garlic clove.

Garlic technically does not contain allicin, but rather, it contains two agents in separate compartments of the clove that react to form the sulfur-rich compound allicin when the plant needs it: alliin and an enzyme called allinase. So, what makes them react?

Garlic has a robust defense system to protect itself from insects and fungi. It enzymatically produces allicin within seconds when it is injured. The crushing of its tissues causes a chemical reaction between the alliin and the allinase, and allicin is produced—nature’s “insecticide.” This is what makes garlic such a potent anti-infective, as well as what produces that pungent aroma when you cut into it.

But allicin is short-lived, lasting less than an hour. Therefore, cooking, aging, crushing, and otherwise processing garlic causes allicin to immediately break down into other compounds, so it’s difficult to get allicin up to biologically active levels in your body.3

Plus, an Army of Sulfur-Rich Phytochemicals


More than 100 different compounds have been identified in garlic, some of which come from the rapid breakdown of allicin itself. The absorption, metabolism, and biological effects of all these compounds are only partially understood. So, although garlic is known to possess a wealth of health benefits, we still do not know exactly which benefits come from which compounds, what compounds get into which tissues, etc.

As powerful as allicin is as an anti-infective, it only makes sense that garlic’s other health effects come from the synergism of those many OTHER compounds. This is a complicated topic, and if you want to explore it further, the Oregon State’s Linus Pauling Institute has a comprehensive article in their online Micronutrient Information Center.4

What About Garlic Supplements?


Most commercial garlic supplements perform quite poorly when it comes to actually being able to form allicin in your body. Allinase is destroyed by the strong acids in your stomach, which is why most supplements are “enteric coated,” to keep them from dissolving until they enter your small intestine. But most supplements tested produce only minimal amounts of allicin under these tough digestive conditions. Many garlic supplements list “allicin potential” on the label, which refers to how much allicin could be formed when alliin is converted, not how much allicin is actually produced.

Claims of actual “allicin release” may be more reliable, but with digestive conditions being so individual and variable, I would be less than confident you’re getting what the label promises. Therefore, when it comes to garlic, I believe it is much better to eat the real food rather than rely on a supplement. And due to the fact that allicin won’t be formed unless the garlic clove is crushed, you have to crush it before swallowing to get the full benefit, or chew it up. If chewing up raw garlic is a bit too **** for you, then you may have cause for celebration: aged black garlic to the rescue!

Aged Black Garlic Has Arrived!




Developed in Korea, black garlic has been gaining popularity among Western foodies for several years now, but it has recently caught the eye of the health-minded due to studies revealing its impressive nutritional properties. Black garlic is produced by “fermenting” whole bulbs of fresh garlic in a humidity-controlled environment in temperatures of about 140 to 170 degrees F for 30 days. No additives, no preservatives... just pure garlic. Once out of the heat, the bulbs are then left to oxidize in a clean room for 45 days. This lengthy process causes the garlic cloves to turn black and develop a soft, chewy texture with flavors reminiscent of “balsamic vinegar” and “soy sauce,” with a sweet “prune-like” taste. Aficionados claim the flavor will impress even the most avid garlic-hater, as the pungency and spiciness is gone.5

Although the process is consistently described as “fermentation,” it really isn’t that in the strictest sense, as the transformation does not involve microbial processes—specifically, enzymatic breakdown and the Maillard Reaction are responsible for the caramelization of the sugars, dark color and deep, complex flavor profile.6  As the pearly white cloves slowly transition into their final black appearance, compounds in the fresh garlic transform into a whole new range of compounds. Compared to fresh garlic, black garlic is low in alliin but it is astonishingly high in other antioxidants!

Double the Antioxidants of Fresh Garlic


In a 2009 mouse study, Japanese researchers found that black garlic was more effective than fresh garlic in reducing the size of tumors. The study was published in the journal Medicinal and Aromatic Plant Science and Technology.7 In another study, black garlic was found to have twice the antioxidant levels as fresh—the aging/fermenting process appears to double the antioxidants. Black garlic is packed with high concentrations of sulfurous compounds, especially one in particular: s-allylcycteine (SAC).8 Science has shown a number of health benefits from SAC, including inhibition of cholesterol synthesis.9

Perhaps this is why Mandarin oil painter Choo Keng Kwang experienced a complete reversal of his psoriasis after just four days of eating half a bulb of black garlic a day—this, after trying countless medically prescribed skin creams that were all complete failures.

An advantage of SAC is that it is well-absorbed and much more stable than allicin and 100 percent bioavailable. Researchers are confident it plays a significant role in garlic’s overall health benefits.10 Be mindful, however, that black garlic’s benefits may be more effective than fresh garlic for some conditions but not others, given its allicin content is low. For example, I suspect it may not be as effective if you have an infection, as allicin is thought to be the primary anti-infective agent in garlic, and fresh garlic is higher in allicin than black.  According to Blue Fortune Farm (which admittedly sells black garlic), black garlic has the following favorable nutrient profile:11

  SAC (mg/g) Calcium (mg) Phosphorus (mg) Protein (g)
Black Garlic 5.84 36.66 80 12.5
Raw Garlic 0.32 5.0 40 2.2

Sprouted Garlic Is Fresh Garlic, Multiplied...


Do you toss your garlic into the compost pile when it begins sending up those bright green shoots? You might want to stop doing that after you read the most recent report about sprouted garlic. In an article published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry,12 garlic sprouted for five days was found to have higher antioxidant activity than fresher, younger bulbs, and it had different metabolites, suggesting it also makes different substances.

Researchers concluded that sprouting your garlic might be a useful way to improve its antioxidant potential. Extracts from this garlic even protected cells in a laboratory dish from certain types of damage.13 This isn’t really surprising when you consider the nutritional changes that typically occur in plants when they sprout. When seedlings grow into green plants, they make many new compounds, including those that protect the young plant against pathogens. The same thing is likely happening when green shoots grow from old heads of garlic.

Sprouting—Intentionally!


Growing your own sprouts is a great way to boost your nutrition, especially if you have limited space for gardening. Sprouted seeds of various kinds can contain up to 30 times the nutrition of homegrown organic vegetables and allow your body to extract more vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and essential fats from the foods you eat. If you want more information, please refer to our earlier article about sprouting. While you can sprout a variety of different beans, nuts, seeds, and grains, sprouts in general have the following beneficial attributes:
1.Support for cell regeneration
2.Powerful sources of antioxidants, minerals, vitamins, and enzymes that protect against free radical damage
3.Alkalinizing effect on your body, which is thought to protect against disease, including cancer (as many tumors are acidic)
4.Abundantly rich in oxygen, which can also help protect against abnormal cell growth, viruses, and bacteria that cannot survive in an oxygen-rich environment

Black Garlic or White, They're Both Good



Whether you choose to go raw or adventure into the black, you can’t go wrong with garlic. It gives new meaning to the term “heart healthy food”! And garlic goes with just about everything. You can smother your roasting chicken with it, sauté it with veggies, add it to your salad dressing, or run it right through your juicer along with the other veggies for a real immune-booster. Whatever form of garlic you prefer, you can have some fun experimenting as you widen your culinary repertoire, and build your health at the same time!

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/04/21/sprouted-black-garlic.aspx
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Dietary Fiber Helps Curb Appetite, and Promotes Heart Health

May 12, 2014

Quote
You'll also be hard-pressed to find any beneficial fiber in processed foods, so contrary to the advice given in the featured video, I'd advise you to refrain from adding more whole grains to your diet, as a high-grain diet promotes insulin and leptin resistance, and that's the last thing you need... There are basically two types of fiber:

•Soluble fiber, found in cucumbers, blueberries, beans, and nuts, dissolves into a gel-like texture, helping to slow down your digestion. This helps you to feel full longer, which can help with weight control


•Insoluble fiber, found in foods like dark green leafy vegetables, green beans, celery, and carrots, does not dissolve at all and helps add bulk to your stool. This helps food to move through your digestive tract more quickly for healthy elimination

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6L9Cz2mwXc&feature=player_embedded

By Dr. Mercola


You've probably heard that fiber is an important part of your diet, and in all likelihood, your reasons for including foods like whole wheat bran muffins is to ensure you're getting enough fiber.

However, this is a far from ideal choice, and part of this article will be dedicated to reviewing more beneficial fiber options. I've been interested in the health benefits of fiber for a long time. I was even given the nickname Dr. Fiber by classmates when I was in medical school 33 years ago—that's how passionate I was about the benefits of fiber!

I've since come to appreciate that the type of fiber in your diet, as well as your gut health, play a major role in harnessing fiber's health potential while avoiding its potential pitfalls.

Fiber Basics

Full article with another video (on probiotics) here:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/05/12/fiber-foods.aspx
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Having a sense of purpose may add years to your life, study finds
  

Feeling that you have a sense of purpose in life may help you live longer, no matter what your age, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

    

The research has clear implications for promoting positive aging and adult development, says lead researcher Patrick Hill of Carleton University in Canada:

"Our findings point to the fact that finding a direction for life, and setting overarching goals for what you want to achieve can help you actually live longer, regardless of when you find your purpose," says Hill. "So the earlier someone comes to a direction for life, the earlier these protective effects may be able to occur."

 

Previous studies have suggested that finding a purpose in life lowers risk of mortality above and beyond other factors that are known to predict longevity. But, Hill points out, almost no research examined whether the benefits of purpose vary over time, such as across different developmental periods or after important life transitions.



Hill and colleague Nicholas Turiano of the University of Rochester Medical Center decided to explore this question, taking advantage of the nationally representative data available from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study.

The researchers looked at data from over 6000 participants, focusing on their self-reported purpose in life (e.g., "Some people wander aimlessly through life, but I am not one of them") and other psychosocial variables that gauged their positive relations with others and their experience of positive and negative emotions.

Over the 14-year follow-up period represented in the MIDUS data, 569 of the participants had died (about 9% of the sample). Those who had died had reported lower purpose in life and fewer positive relations than did survivors.

Greater purpose in life consistently predicted lower mortality risk across the lifespan, showing the same benefit for younger, middle-aged, and older participants across the follow-up period.




This consistency came as a surprise to the researchers:

"There are a lot of reasons to believe that being purposeful might help protect older adults more so than younger ones," says Hill. "For instance, adults might need a sense of direction more, after they have left the workplace and lost that source for organizing their daily events. In addition, older adults are more likely to face mortality risks than younger adults."

"To show that purpose predicts longer lives for younger and older adults alike is pretty interesting, and underscores the power of the construct," he explains.

Purpose had similar benefits for adults regardless of retirement status, a known mortality risk factor. And the longevity benefits of purpose in life held even after other indicators of psychological well-being, such as positive relations and positive emotions, were taken into account.

"These findings suggest that there's something unique about finding a purpose that seems to be leading to greater longevity," says Hill.

The researchers are currently investigating whether having a purpose might lead people to adopt healthier lifestyles, thereby boosting longevity.

Hill and Turiano are also interested in examining whether their findings hold for outcomes other than mortality.

"In so doing, we can better understand the value of finding a purpose throughout the lifespan, and whether it provides different benefits for different people," Hill concludes.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-05-purpose-years-life.html
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

AGelbert

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7630
  • Location: Colchester, Vermont
    • View Profile
    • Agelbert Truth AND Consequences
Cynical Distrust Associated with Increased Risk of Dementia  :o

Older people with high levels of cynical distrust had a more than 2.5 times greater risk of developing dementia than those with low levels.1 Cynical distrust is described as believing that most people are self-interested and out for themselves as opposed to looking out for the community and others.

Some experts describe it as a form of chronic anger. 2 The finding adds to growing research showing that negative emotions, and cynicism in particular, may lead to poor health. It's dangerous in a number of ways.

For instance, cynical people are more likely to smoke and gain excess weight, and less likely to exercise. They also struggle more with stress and have higher levels of chronic inflammation, which is linked to chronic diseases including dementia. For instance, research has shown:

•Women with cynical, hostile attitudes are more likely to die prematurely and have higher rates of death from coronary heart disease than women with "positive future expectations" 3

•People with cynical attitudes may suffer more from stress, and do not get as much of the stress-buffering benefits offered by positive social support 4

•Cynical hostility is associated with poor oral health 5

•Cynical hostility is associated with increased markers of inflammation, which may contribute to increased heart risks6

•Cynical hostility is associated with increased metabolic burden among middle-aged and older adults 7


How Do Negative Emotions Harm Your Health?

It's now undeniable that your emotional health engages in a continuous, intricate dance with your physical health, such that it is virtually impossible to untangle the two. As noted by Dr. Stephen Sinatra:7


"Suppressed anger, rage, loss of vital connection (heartbreak), and emotional isolation and lack of intimacy with others are all 'hidden' emotional risk factors that can contribute to the development of heart disease.

Many cardiologists fail to recognize these psycho-emotional factors which often underlie other commonly recognized risk factors such as excessive smoking, inappropriate diet, and even high blood pressure and cholesterol levels."



Full story here:


http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/06/12/cynical-distrust-dementia-risk.aspx
Leges         Sine    Moribus     Vanae   
Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
0 Replies
83 Views
Last post October 29, 2013, 03:35:05 pm
by AGelbert
1 Replies
129 Views
Last post May 06, 2017, 08:54:14 pm
by AGelbert
0 Replies
95 Views
Last post July 26, 2014, 01:30:45 am
by AGelbert

+-Recent Topics

Wind Power by AGelbert
Today at 07:35:49 pm

Global Warming is WITH US by AGelbert
Today at 07:25:12 pm

Corruption in Government by AGelbert
Today at 07:06:23 pm

Homebody Handy Hints by AGelbert
September 18, 2017, 11:16:31 pm

Pollution by AGelbert
September 18, 2017, 11:12:18 pm

Future Earth by AGelbert
September 18, 2017, 07:14:08 pm

The Big Picture of Renewable Energy Growth by AGelbert
September 17, 2017, 10:17:00 pm

Majestic and sometimes Spectacular Scenery by AGelbert
September 17, 2017, 07:52:46 pm

Non-routine News by AGelbert
September 17, 2017, 07:22:28 pm

Money by AGelbert
September 17, 2017, 02:55:55 pm

Free Web Hit Counter By CSS HTML Tutorial