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Author Topic: Plants Which are BOTH Nutritional and Medicinal  (Read 3699 times)

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AGelbert

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 :) Hey Surly and RE,

My wife discovered a great (real 😋) banana 🍌 treat from Vitacost. It's a way to get all that good potassium from bananas without frequent trips to the grocery store. They aren't cheap, but I think they are worth it.

This guy in Brazil started dehydrating bananas that were blemished or too ripe for marketing some decades ago. Vitacost sells them now. They taste great and have the same nutritive value as fresh bananas due to the clever dehydration process (partial, they can be chewed and are not rock hard like other dehydrated products out there - to prevent further ripening, even though dehydration is partial, they use some banana dust over the bite sized portions).

😋

This is a great way to make use of food that would have been thrown out previously due to the ridiculous fruit marketing practices that force markets to only sell fruit with no blemishes. Also, this guarantees a higher marketable yield (and profit  :icon_mrgreen:) for growers, as well as saving a lot of energy, because these products require no refrigeration whatsoever.

RE could stock up on these to guarantee he has enough potassium if he is homebound due to health problems. We all need potassium. Without enough, we begin to feel fatigued and listless. We can lose muscle tone from lack of potassium. This is not limited to our large muscles. Lack of K can adversly affect peristaltic esophageal movement needed to send food down to the stomach and also intestinal movement needed for proper digestion.

Potassium: 10 Symptoms of Potassium Deficiency 🚩

By: Dr. Helen Okoye, MD on 28 Mar, 2018

SNIPPET:

Potassium Deficiency Symptom #1: Muscle Weakness

Muscle weakness is the most common symptom associated with a potassium deficiency. Potassium plays a key role in promoting muscle strength and the overall wellbeing of muscle tissue. The muscle weakness can make it more difficult for an affected person to properly move their legs and arms.

Potassium Deficiency Symptom #2: Muscle Cramps
In addition to muscle weakness, many individuals who suffer from a lack of potassium in their body also experience muscle cramps. Muscle cramps may be mild or severe, and can affect a number of different muscle groups in the body.

full article:

http://10faq.com/health/potassium-deficiency-symptoms/

NOTE:
There are other foods out there besides bananas that have more potassium, but I like the taste of bananas.  ;D

13 Foods That Have More Potassium Than a Banana
FoodNutritionPublished on Tuesday, October 24th, 2017 @ 7:59 pm

Health Team

By Trista

SNIPPET:

If you need potassium, your go-to source is usually bananas. Peel a medium one and you will get about 422 milligrams of potassium, which is around nine percent of your 4,700 milligrams recommended daily intake. Well, what if you don’t like bananas, or just want something new? There are a plethora of foods that can give you potassium and other essential vitamins and minerals. In fact, some of them might surprise you! Check out these 13 foods that have more potassium than a banana.

Full article:

http://health.facty.com/food/nutrition/13-foods-that-have-more-potassium-than-a-banana/





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AGelbert

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Quote

Hey Surly and RE,  My wife discovered a great (real 😋) banana 🍌 treat from Vitacost. It's a way to get all that good potassium from bananas without frequent trips to the grocery store. They aren't cheap, but I think they are worth it.

Another good example of hw you can learn something new every day around here. I had no idea.

Thanks, AG.


Glad to be of service.   


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AGelbert

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What Effect Does Catnip Have On Humans?
By: Tracy Hall

Have you ever watched a cat playing with a catnip toy and wondered what the experience was like? An estimated 70-90% of domestic cats have some reaction to this member of the mint family, and it's hard not to be curious. After all, who wouldn't want to share in the giddy frenzy or blissful relaxation of a playtime session with their feline friend? Throughout history many cultures have experimented with Nepeta cataria, commonly known as catnip, the extent of which might surprise you.

For felines, the main attractant in catnip is a chemical called nepetalactone. This oil is metabolized in the cat's body and passes harmlessly through urine. How humans discovered the effect that the herb had on animals is unclear. It is also unclear when humans began using it for themselves. However, there are countless records of humans using catnip for medicinal purposes. Its use in the treatment of illnesses was prominent enough for catnip to be included in the United States Pharmacopeia from 1840-1890. Catnip has been used to treat nervousness, menstrual cramps, digestive tract irritation, colds, and the flu. It was only a matter of time before curiosity got the best of people and they decided to explore even more applications. Eventually there surfaced yet another potential use of catnip: as an intoxicant.

The intoxicating effect of catnip has long since been the stuff of urban legends. According to one paper on catnip, it was used as a "filler" in (or even in place of) marijuana in the 1960's. Today, an Internet search for "catnip human intoxicant" yields more than 10,000 results. Despite this number, the vast majority of published experiences have come from individuals, not research groups. Most indicate the ingestion of catnip via drinking tea or smoking, either by itself or mixed with tobacco. And the effects are...reportedly, nothing like Fluffy's.

Most people indicate mild feelings of relaxation or drowsiness, coupled with complaints of foul taste or smell. At higher doses, some users feel nauseous. Some have suggested that the lightheaded feeling sometimes caused by smoking catnip is due to simple lack of oxygen in the body. Notably lacking are the euphoric or hallucinogenic experiences suggested by feline reactions to the herb.

In short, catnip has a long history of human use and is still included today in many natural remedy compendiums. Although it might help quell a stomachache or calm frazzled nerves, humans experience few, if any, intoxicating effects from catnip. So when it comes to "feelin' groovy", it's best to leave the toy mice to the cats.

Resources:

http://www.herbcompanion.com/herb-profiles/herb-basics-catnip-not-just-for-felines-anymore.aspx
http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/summary/208/7/1190-a
http://www.springerlink.com/content/f613756573257t02/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1480656/?page=2

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AGelbert

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7 Herbs that Grow in Shade

By Leda Meredith

Wondering what to plant in those shady areas of your landscape? There’s no need to resign yourself to standard shade-fillers, like pachysandra and ivy, when you could be growing useful herbs that thrive in low-light conditions. While many culinary herbs do require lots of direct sunlight (like basil and oregano, which originated in the sunny Mediterranean), other herbs usually listed as full-sun plants will do just fine in partial shade. Parsley, anise hyssop, lemon balm and shiso are among the best herbs for dappled light or areas that receive only a couple of hours of direct sun daily.

Other, less-familiar herbs actually prefer shade. In nature, these plants can be found growing in the dappled light below trees, or at the edges of forests, where the sun shines directly on them for only a short time each day. These plants—which include wild ginger, spicebush and sweet woodruff—will do beautifully in a shady garden site, and will add enticing new flavors and aromas to your cooking.

For beds and borders shaded by trees, fences or buildings, try one or more of these seven stars for shade.

1. Sweet woodruff

Sweet woodruff (Galium odoratum; Zones 5-8).


A wonderful groundcover, this European native bears lacy, white flowers in late spring. A naturally moist or irrigated site is best. Both leaves and flowers have a fresh scent and make a delicately sweet tea. In Germany, the flowering tops are traditionally used to make May wine. To make your own May wine, steep flowers in Riesling wine overnight, strain out the woodruff, and add strawberries. Serve chilled.

Avoid consuming sweet woodruff if you have circulatory problems or if you are pregnant


2. Anise hyssop
Anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum; Zones 4-10).

Many culinary and medicinal herbs thrive in partial or full shade. Although gardening guides continue to list anise hyssop (shown this page) as suitable for “full sun only,” this native American perennial will bloom and thrive in partial shade. Both the flowers and leaves have an intense licorice aroma and flavor. Fresh or dried, the herb makes a delicious tea that pairs well with baked goods like scones, muffins and biscotti. Dried anise hyssop leaves also can be used in place of anise seeds to flavor cookies.

Anise hyssop has a long history of medicinal use by Native Americans. The Cheyenne used anise hyssop tea to relieve depression, while the Cree and Chippewa included it in protective medicine bundles.

3. Wild ginger

Wild ginger (Asarum canadense; Zones 2-8) is native to the woodlands of North America. An attractive groundcover with heart-shaped leaves, wild ginger also can be used to flavor both sweet and savory dishes. To harvest wild ginger without destroying the perennial, dig about 2 inches into the soil between the plants. Snip off a few inches of the rhizomes, then pat down the soil. You can harvest in this fashion several times a year without decimating your beautiful patch of wild ginger.

4. Parsley

Parsley (Petroselinum spp.; Zones 5-9).

This Mediterranean biennial has been cultivated since at least the 3rd century b.c. Choose flat-leaf parsley (Petroselinum crispum var. neapolitanum; shown at right) for flavor and curly parsley (P. crispum) for garnishes. In addition to using the leaves in almost any savory dish, you can use the chopped roots—which taste like a cross between parsnips and carrots—in soups and stews.

The plant is quite cold-hardy and can be harvested even when temperatures hover around freezing.

5. Shiso

Shiso (Perilla frutescens; annual), also called beefsteak plant, has three leaf color variations (purple, green and a bicolor), all of which are as ornamental as they are tasty. Shiso self-seeds readily in the garden, but because of its shallow root system, it’s easy to weed out.

In Japan, purple shiso (shown above) is used to color the pickled ginger served with sashimi. Shiso’s versatile flavor, a combination of cilantro and mint with spicy overtones, is as good with fresh fruit as it is with savory seafood and rice dishes.

Shiso Salad

Serves 4
• 2 cucumbers, peeled and sliced
• 2 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
• 1 large peach, peeled and chopped
• ¼ cup green or purple shiso, chopped
• Pinch of salt
1. Combine cucumbers and vinegar; let stand at room temperature 10 minutes.

2. Add peach, shiso and salt. Toss to combine.

6. Lemon balm

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis; Zones 3-7) is a European perennial that does as well in shade as it does in full sun. Its delightful lemon scent comes from its high essential oil content. The leaves are best harvested in mid-spring. As a culinary herb, lemon balm makes a delicious tea and the minced leaves are a nice addition to fruit salads. Essential oil of lemon balm is used in aromatherapy as an antidepressant. The herb loses its potency when dried, but the fresh herb can be tinctured to preserve its medicinal properties.

In the garden, lemon balm can be invasive. Prune off the flowering tops before they go to seed.

Lemon Balm Butter Sauce

Serves 4 to 6
• 2 tablespoons fresh lemon balm leaves, minced
• 1⁄4 cup butter, melted
• Salt, to taste
1. Add lemon balm to melted butter.

2. Wait 30 seconds, then toss with cooked vegetables.

7. Spicebush
Spicebush (Lindera benzoin; Zones 4-9), sometimes called northern spicebush, is a lovely, native American woodland shrub that thrives in partial shade, such as it would have at the edge of a forest clearing. Spicebush grows to 10 feet tall, with pretty, teardrop-shaped leaves 2 to 5 inches long.

The entire plant is aromatic. The female plants produce fragrant yellow flowers in early spring, followed by small, bright-red oval fruit in autumn. (Because spicebush is dioecious, both male and female plants are needed for fruit production; check with your supplier to be sure you are getting both if you wish to obtain the berries.)

Use the fresh leaves in hot or iced tea; they do not retain their flavor well when dried. The twigs can be simmered in water for a warming tea any time of year.

In the fall, collect the red berries and dry them to use as a spice that has both sweet and savory uses. Sometimes sold as “Appalachian allspice,” spicebush can be used like allspice and makes a scrumptious ice cream and spice cake. The berries have a peppery note that makes them an excellent addition to meat rubs and marinades, as well.

The Ojibwa and Iroquois tribes treated spicebush berries as two different seasonings. They separated the seeds from the surrounding pulp and red skins. The pulp and skins were used for their sweet, allspice-like taste and the seeds for their peppery bite. If you want to separate the berries into two different spices, do so before drying or freezing as they are almost impossible to separate after preserving. Separated or whole, the berries have a high fatty oil content and can go rancid if stored at room temperature. Store both fresh and dried spicebush in the freezer. To use, grind in an electric coffee grinder. Note: Take care not to confuse Lindera benzoin with another native American shrub, Calycanthus floridus, commonly called “Carolina allspice” and also sometimes called “spicebush.”

Calycanthus floridus

To Buy: Spicebush, sweet woodruff and wild ginger are available from Forestfarm, (541) 846-7269, www.forestfarm.com; Lazy S’S Farm Nursery, www.lazyssfarm.com; and Companion Plants, (740) 592-4643, www.companionplants.com. Anise hyssop, lemon balm, parsley and shiso are widely available; mail-order suppliers include Companion Plants; Johnny’s Selected Seeds, (877) 564-6697, www.johnnyseeds.com; and Richters, (905) 640-6677, www.richters.com.

Leda Meredith is a botanist, writer and instructor at the New York Botanical Garden and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, specializing in edible and medicinal plants. She is the author of Botany, Ballet, & Dinner from Scratch: A Memoir with Recipes (Heliotrope Books, 2008).

Source: http://www.motherearthliving.com/
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AGelbert

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Red Clover Herb

Eating clover

The leaves, flowers, seeds, and roots of clovers are all edible.
😋

The young leaves, taken before the plant flowers, can be eaten raw in salads. As the plant matures, cooking the leaves is recommended. The dried leaves are said to add a slightly vanilla-like flavor to baked goods. In my own experience with clover leaves, I found them to be rather bitter (maybe I picked them at the wrong time). I stick to the flowers.

The roots should be eaten cooked.

The flowers and seeds are the parts of the clover that are of greatest interest to most foragers. The flowers are used raw in salads as well as sauteed, stir-fried, or fried as fritters. They are also popular for making teas and wines.

The flowers and seeds can be dried and ground into a flour.

The binomial name for white clover is Trifolium repens. Red clover is Trifolium pratense.

All of those are Latin words. Trifolium means "three leaves", repens means "recent, sudden, or fresh", and pratense means "found in meadows."

The clovers are native to Europe, Asia, and northern Africa. They were introduced to the Americas by settlers. Clover is commonly used as fodder for livestock and is also a valuable soil builder.

http://www.squidoo.com/trifolium

Agelbert NOTE: When I was a kid in Kansas, I used to eat clover leaves and stems by the bunches. They have a nice sour pickly taste. I never did eat the flowers though. I figured if bees liked them, some small bugs might like them too and I would eat them by mistake. Bugs never were my thing.  :P :D
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AGelbert

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Re: Plants Which are BOTH Nutritional and Medicinal
« Reply #50 on: October 19, 2018, 05:16:22 pm »
Trump 🦀 AG Cracker Sessions 🐵 Keeps Doing STUPID on Behalf of the Racist U.S. Prison Industrial Complex. 

As Canada Legalizes Marijuana the US 🦍 Tightens Border Controls

October 18, 2018

Canada, the US’s largest trading partner legalized marijuana. Most states bordering Canada it is legalized or medicalized. However, the Trump administration plans to deny entry to Canadians who use or sell marijuana


https://therealnews.com/stories/as-canada-legalizes-marijuana-the-us-tightens-border-controls
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Faith,
if it has not works, is dead, being alone.

 

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