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Author Topic: Healthy Eating  (Read 433 times)

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AGelbert

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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2015, 06:12:09 pm »
Time to refuel? (Or not!)  ???

by David Catchpoole

One of man’s clever inventions is the fuel gauge used in cars. In modern ones, there is often even a warning light that comes on when it’s ‘time to refuel’. Another is the valve on fuel-filling nozzles that shuts off to prevent overfilling and wastage/spilling. But our human body has analogous devices, too.

Humans need to refuel, too


Once, while lunching with an older acquaintance, I complimented him on his slim physique at a time when many in society were tending towards obesity. His answer astonished me. He said, “I can’t take any credit for that because it seems I don’t have the urge to eat that other folks have.” He could not recall ever having known what it was like to feel ‘hungry’. Eating gave him no pleasure nor was there any urge to do so. “The only reason I know I have to eat is because experience has shown that if I don’t, after a day or so I notice I’m tired and listless. So I know I have to eat to get my energy back.”

time-to-refuel

It seems his internal ‘fuel gauge’ and ‘low-fuel warning light’ were broken.

‘Enough fuel, already!’

Our body also has an appetite ‘switch-off’ mechanism similar in effect to the automatic cut-off of a fuel nozzle, so as not to ‘over-fill’. In some obese people the ‘Enough fuel, already!’ click-off mechanism is known to be faulty. However, it can be hard to identify precisely where the problem lies, as a range of hormones is known to be involved in the body’s food-feedback systems, and the processes are far from fully understood. However, some insights are emerging.

The leptin hormone


In the 1990s, scientists discovered the hormone leptin, produced by the ob gene.1 Leptin is now known to curb appetite.2 High levels activate certain of the brain’s nerve cells, or neurons, in a way that suppresses the desire to eat, instead generating a feeling of ‘fullness’. Low levels, on the other hand, stimulate hunger.

Researchers have observed that giving the leptin hormone to obese people born without the ob gene reduced their hunger pangs. They ate less, and so were able to lose weight.

How exactly leptin achieves this, and thus helps the body’s delicate balance between energy intake (eating) and energy usage (exercise and metabolism), isn’t completely known yet. Many scientists suspect that leptin might be as crucial as the hormone insulin in this function. When leptin levels are low, the sight and smell of tasty food can stimulate an immediate desire to eat. But sight and smell don’t have anything like the same impact when leptin levels are high.

Researchers have observed that giving the leptin hormone to obese people born without the ob gene (and who thus lacked their own naturally-produced leptin) reduced their hunger pangs. They ate less, and so were able to lose weight.

Unfortunately for those who might therefore have hoped that leptin could be used to treat all obesity, “the story turned out to be much more complicated”.2 It’s only a minority of obese people who lack the ob gene. Most obese people have the ob gene, but it produces so much leptin that they’ve become resistant to its effects.  :o Researchers are endeavouring to understand the mechanism of that resistance.3

The ghrelin hormone

Another hormone now known to have a key role in appetite is ghrelin, which stimulates   appetite. As the stomach empties itself of the previous meal, bloodstream levels of the ghrelin hormone rise rapidly, signalling to the body that “it’s time to eat!” Then as soon as the stomach becomes full, ghrelin levels fall again.

In people who lose weight through dieting, ghrelin levels become “chronically high”—which might help explain why many people struggle to adhere to such weight loss programs.

In people who lose weight through dieting, ghrelin levels become “chronically high”—which might help explain why many people struggle to adhere to such weight loss programs.2

The melanocortin–4 receptors

Researchers are also investigating the receptors, or ‘docking sites’, on neurons for a hormone called melanocortin–4.

When these receptors are working properly, they help to suppress appetite. But defective receptors lead to “morbid obesity”.2

Crediting design

These hard-won insights into the intricacies of the body’s appetite-control systems point to far greater complexity than that of the car fuel gauge and nozzle overfill-prevention mechanisms. Surely nobody would say that fuel gauges and automatic pump shut-off gadgetry were not designed. The human engineers certainly deserve the credit for their designs, so how much more honour is due to the Designer of the human body’s intricate stomach-sight-smell intertwined feedback systems? And the fact that they now don’t always work is the result of Adam’s fall into sin, which brought about God’s just curse on creation (see also box above).4


Quote
DNA Decay

When someone is born lacking hunger signals, or with the defective food-feedback mechanisms in certain obese people today, these are examples of genomic decay (mutations). This is all part of the “bondage to decay” (Romans 8:19–22) to which the originally “very good” creation (Genesis 1:31) was subjected—because of the first man’s sin (Genesis 2:16–17, 3; Romans 5:12,17; 1 Corinthians 15:21–22). No wonder then that genomic decay (due to mutations) is increasingly in evidence.5 E.g. people lacking the ob gene, or unresponsive to the appetite-suppressing leptin it produces, or with defective melanocortin–4 receptors.6

References and notes
1.Zhang, Y., and 6 others, Positional cloning of the mouse obese gene and its human homologue, Nature 372:425–432, 1994.  Return to text.
2.Society for Neuroscience, Brain briefings—Appetite and food intake, sfn.org, November 2007. Return to text.
3.Like Type 2 diabetes and other modern ‘scourges’, it may be related to the increasing shift to high energy density and high-glycemic-index refined grains and sugars and away from fruit and vegetables, especially in developed countries. Return to text.
4.Smith, H., Cosmic and universal death from. Adam’s Fall: an exegesis of Romans 8:19–23, J. Creation 21(1):75–85, 2007; creation.com/ romans8. Return to text.
5.Catchpoole, D., Time—no friend of evolution, Creation 34(3):30–31, 2012; creation.com/time-genetic. Return to text.
6.Interestingly, estrogen has been found to use the same pathways as leptin uses to suppress appetite—“a possible reason why women tend to gain weight after menopause.” (see main text, ref. 2) Return to text.


http://creation.com/time-to-refuel-or-not
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AGelbert

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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2016, 03:58:37 pm »
A healthy Mediterranean-style diet costs less than a junky American diet

Katherine Martinko (@feistyredhair)
Living / Green Food
March 2, 2016

An interesting research project has found that swapping out meat for olive oil and more canned legumes and frozen vegetables costs less than the most economical version of the USDA's dietary guidelines.

There is a misconception that eating a healthy Mediterranean-style diet is too expensive for low-income families, but new research dispels that notion. A joint project between the Miriam Hospital and the Rhode Island Community Food Bank has demonstrated that a plant-based diet rich in extra-virgin olive oil is cheaper than the most economical recommendations made by the United States Department of Agriculture’s MyPlate program – a whole $750 cheaper per year!  ;D

Dr. Mary Flynn, who works as a dietician at the Miriam Hospital and was a lead author on the study, said that most people think healthy diets are expensive due to the increased amounts of fresh vegetables and fruit, but she suspected it was really the meat that made it pricey. Flynn set out to show that we don’t actually need that much meat, and that replacing with olive oil can not only reduce the cost but also improve health.

"Extra-virgin olive oil is thought to be expensive, but we suspected it was meat that made a diet expensive, and extra-virgin olive oil is cheaper than even small amounts of meat. We expected the two diets to be similar in fruit and vegetable content, but our plant-based diet was substantially cheaper, and featured a lot more fruits and vegetables and whole grains."

Flynn developed recipes that were used by Food Bank clients on an average of 2.8 times per week. The recipes provide price breakdowns per batch and per serving. Clients responded favorably, saying the recipes were easier to prepare than their usual ones and that they lost weight while experiencing improved food security.

The big difference between Flynn’s approach and the one espoused by MyPlate is that Flynn uses greater quantities of frozen and canned products, such as chickpeas, black beans, and vegetables. They are cheaper than their fresh counterparts while still retaining the same nutritional benefits. This accounted for much of the price difference: $53.11 per week for the USDA recommended diet vs. $38.75 for Flynn’s version of a Mediterranean diet. Meat cost $11.20 (or 21 percent) of the USDA diet.

Instead of meat, the plant-based diet includes 4 tablespoons of extra-virgin olive oil per day. Olive oil is often perceived as luxurious but works out to only $3.61 (or 9 percent) of the weekly food cost. When a household budget is limited, olive oil is a good way to increase one’s intake of healthy fats.

Other studies have shown that low-income families fill their grocery carts first with meat, eggs, cereal, and baked goods, none of which featured prominently in this version of a Mediterranean diet. EurekAlert says that Flynn’s work in educating consumers “to include some weekly meals that do not contain meat, poultry or seafood but do include extra virgin olive oil, vegetables, and a starch will decrease food costs and improve food access and body weight.”

It is an interesting study with hopeful results for the many people who think it is impossible to eat healthily on a shoestring. That’s not the case, as this research team has happily shown, as long as those dollars are spent wisely. 

http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/healthy-mediterranean-style-diet-does-not-have-be-expensive.html
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AGelbert

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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #17 on: March 12, 2016, 09:22:44 pm »

David Wolfe, a leading authority on nutrition and raw food, points out the value of a simple mushroom growing on a tree stump.

 In these mushrooms is where you will find some of the strongest medicinal compounds.

He shows us the cloud mushroom, so common it grows in every state of the US and Canada. 


 It has tremendous healing properties: immune system enhancing and anti-cancer properties, and it detoxifies the liver not only of cancer causing agents but of plastic by-products!

 If you learn to identify it, you can simply harvest this mushroom, take it home and make a healing tea.  ;D

 --Bibi Farber

 This video was produced by 21daystohealth.com - See more at: http://www.nextworldtv.com/videos/health-and-wellness/healing-with-wild-mushrooms-.html#sthash.H0Buc1CF.dpuf
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AGelbert

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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2016, 06:25:09 pm »
What can sugar teach us about evidence-based chemical regulation? ???

April 14, 2016 at 6:07 pm

This month, we recommend reading
“The Sugar Conspiracy”, a Guardian Long Read by science writer and journalist Ian Leslie. The article is interesting because the challenges of developing evidence-based chemical regulations are mirrored in this account of the lessons we should be learning from a 60+ year-old argument about the place of sugar and fat in dietary guidance for public health.
 
Sugar, chemicals, and the role of science in policy-making

Chemicals and public health policy both sit at the interface of science and decision-making, trying to make sense of accumulating scientific evidence about health risks posed by chemicals, how to best make use of that ever-shifting research landscape to agree on desired outcomes, and shape the policies that will stand the best chance of achieving them.

The first lesson about the relationship between science and policy, which “The Sugar Conspiracy” gets right, is that scientific research as well as policy-making is embedded in human social practices: there is no magic cordon which automatically ensures a separation of scientist from society, or of scientific behaviours from regular ones.

In many circumstances, these social determinants may be at least as important for explaining why scientists have a particular set of beliefs as what a putative body of evidence might be saying. These social determinants operate at the personal level and include deference to the charismatic, herding towards majority opinion, punishment for deviance, and intense discomfort with admitting to error.

They also operate at the societal level, with the article touching on how the spread and eventual mainstreaming of an idea can be sometimes be explained without apparent recourse to an evidence base at all: academics accumulate power and appoint like-minded thinkers to influential positions; this increases their funding and ability to determine the research agenda, the methods used, and the admissible evidence.

As the elite spreads and homogenises, any canvassing of expert opinion reaches only a demographically uniform group, and any dissenting opinions are either missed altogether or dismissed as outliers. So by shaping the evidence and the surrounding opinion, ideas can spread through the research community without needing to be right.

The second lesson from the piece is its first misstep: the article misunderstands the role the scientific method can play in providing constraints on the social steers under which scientists operate. Of the above psychological and social pressures, the article states: “Of course, such tendencies are precisely what the scientific method was invented to correct for, and over the long run, it does a good job of it.”

In fact, it is a mistake to hold that the scientific method somehow automatically keeps in check the worst social excesses of human researchers; really, the scientific method cannot do anything automatically because it has to be deliberately applied by researchers in order to have any effect.

Most of the time, this deliberate application is made in the context of the single experiment, whereby the controlled set-up required by the scientific method makes it possible for the researcher to be more confident that the effect they are seeing is a consequence of the changes they are introducing, rather than a consequence of something else happening in the experiment of which they are unaware.

But in “The Sugar Conspiracy”, the author is interested in how scientific research is aggregated: here, the research activity moves from limiting the effect of psychosocial pressures on producing new evidence at the lab bench, to limiting the effect of these pressures on the process of gathering and appraising existing evidence.

Why, in making this transition, should we assume the scientific method is still being applied? Even if scientists are good at conducting controlled experiments in the lab, there is no reason to assume they are equally effective at controlling the variables which affect the process of synthesising all the evidence which those lab experiments are producing.

The third lesson is that we can question another assumption implied by the article: in this case, it is how the Sugar Conspiracy seems to buy into the idea that science produces a canon of fact, to which some people (like John Yudkin) are aligned all along and some (like Ancel Keys) are not.

Quote
In fact, science produces a body of evidence which is sufficiently confusing, messy and open to interpretation that at any given time it might not be possible to tell who is right.
In these instances (which may be the vast majority of the time) there is just opinion, some of it better founded on the available evidence, some of it formed by social determinants, and some of it ultimately turning out to represent the best guess as to the facts of the matter regardless of how it was come to.

If it really were a matter of science determining the facts and researchers agreeing with those facts or not, it is unclear how scientific debate could ever get started: if scientists either know the facts or they do not, then anyone arguing against the facts is either doing so out of ignorance or bad faith. It doesn’t allow for the possibility of uncertainty stemming from the difficulty of interpreting a limited and/or conflicting evidence base.   
This is perhaps why the article focuses on Keys’ rather uncivilised behaviour to explain how he won the argument with Yudkin; however, it is not clear if the debate would have been resolved differently even if Keys had been more of the quiet man which Yudkin was.

In a situation in which nobody knows because the evidence is weak, a decision still has to be made and it is down to luck if it is the right one. (It is also worth noting how Yudkin never really disappeared from view quite as much as the article would have the reader believe, such as this Guardian piece from 1999.)

This is one of the reasons why developing policy from an evidence base is so difficult: except in very restricted decision-making contexts, the evidence base is always going to be too underpowered to be capable of determining the right decision among the multitude of policy choices and their attendant consequences.

This is for two reasons: that the number of possible choices vastly outstrips our capacity to gather sufficient empirical data to determine which choice is best; and because many of the choices are not determinable by research anyway, deriving as they do from our value systems (i.e. what we want in the world).

Where evidence is lacking, opinion fills the space. Where outcomes can be legitimately informed or determined by evidence, the trick will be in determining which opinions are sufficiently based in what is currently known, where there is opinion instead of evidence, and what to do in terms of research to meet the information requirements of the policy-makers. (Where outcomes cannot be legitimately determined by evidence, the trick is ensuring the political process is capable of producing fair and equitable outcomes.)

The final lesson concerns what to do in order to ensure that we are making the best use of evidence in policy-making. At this point, the Sugar Conspiracy rather peters out, being ambivalent about information democracies or information oligarchies, as if somehow the prize of science is clarity in purpose rather than (as the article itself seems to imply throughout) using the evidence to give oneself the best possible chance of making the right decision.

Quote
There is in fact a route to a better way of doing things which means we can be much more optimistic about the prospects for the scientific method in hastening resolution of scientific disputes, whether they are about appropriate sugar intake in dietary guidelines or the risks to health posed by chemicals and other pollutants.

The solution involves revisiting how the scientific method can be applied to the aggregation of evidence.   

The premise of the story, that scientists are bad at developing evidence-based policies, only comes as a surprise because people (scientists included) seem just to assume that because scientists are scientific when they are producing evidence, then they must be just as scientific when they are accumulating evidence.

As the article shows, they are not. But the situation is by no means insoluble: the reason scientists are not very good at accumulating evidence is that it is only relatively recently that the scientific method has been deliberately applied not only to the process of generating evidence, but also to aggregating it.

These lessons have been most painfully learned in medicine, historically an eminence-led profession where, by the 1990s, experts were being found to be making one error after another in their understanding of what they thought the evidence said. This cost lives in administration of ineffective interventions and resulted in clinical trials being conducted for questions to which the answers should already have been known.

Quote
The lesson was that as much methodological care needs to be taken in aggregating research as needs to be taken in producing it.

For this purpose, systematic review methods were invented. In essence, they are simple: it is about taking the principle of control, of transparency and repeatability of methods and of minimising bias, so familiar in lab work, and applying it to how evidence is synthesised.

This has been very successful in medicine, making groups of experts consistently much better at using effective healthcare treatments and rejecting ineffective ones. In the context of systematic review, as the large volume of positive responses to the Teicholz article in the BMJ suggests, the culture shift towards challenging eminence with evidence, facilitated by an accessible evidence-base, could go a long way towards preventing the likes of Ancel Keys apparently getting their way by throwing their weight around rather than demonstrating the evidence for their position.

So while we can’t make scientists asocial, we can start imposing controls on the aggregation of evidence, to minimise (or at least help us identify) the effect which uncontrolled social influences have on what we think the best evidence is saying.

This won’t solve all the problems with ensuring policy makes best use of the best evidence, but it helps with at least one of them.


Further reading

Testing Treatments. Evans et al. (2011).
Short, free and very accessible book about how randomised controlled trials, systematic review methods, patient involvement in research decisions and other hallmarks of the modern approach healthcare research have transformed medicine.

“How science makes environmental controversies worse”. Dan Sarewitz (2004). Offers a compelling explanation of why the processes of conducting research and developing policy should not be conflated.

The Honest Broker. Roger Pielke Jr (2007). Explains how science can become politicised, politics can become scientised, and how science advice, if sought in the right way, can navigate between these two unappealing alternatives.

https://healthandenvironmentonline.com/2016/04/14/what-can-sugar-teach-us-about-evidence-based-chemical-regulation/

Agelbert NOTE: Unsaid in the article, unless you read between the lines (i.e. define what "politicized" means  ;)), is the deliberate cherry picking OFTEN involved in control group selection. This is done, while falsely claiming the control group is a "random" selection, so that the experimental results will produce the "appropriate" benign results if they want to "prove" a chemical is not toxic, carcinogenic or otherwise damaging to humanity and the biosphere. The epidemiological "studies" on cancer clusters near nuclear power plants are an excellent example of disingenuous cherry picking of "control group" subjects. 

The article states, "Where outcomes cannot be legitimately determined by evidence, the trick is ensuring the political process is capable of producing fair and equitable outcomes."

Unfortunately, in our world of rampant corporate corruption of scientific research, the TRICK is ACTUALLY to ENSURE the DESIRED outcome for corporate profit. To this end, the methodology is gamed and the scientific elite are bought and paid for to claim those that question the research are either "ignorant" or "outliers" to be ignored.

The NIST studies on 911 and WTC 7 are ALSO an excellent example of how this gamed science for "officially desired outcomes" works. And the arguments made by people like MKing or Palloy against those that question the NIST study are, as stated above,  that those that question the research are either "ignorant" or "unscientific outliers" to be ignored.

The "scientific method" of those who wish to guarantee DESIRED corporate bottom line outcomes:

 
And DESIRED Gooberment Official Physics Fairy Tales about 911 too!   
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AGelbert

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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #19 on: May 21, 2016, 06:50:57 pm »
May 2016 News Bulletin: Soup-makers drop BPA from cans; French ban on tallowamine/glyphosate formulations.     

May 20, 2016 at 3:29 pm | Posted in News and Science Bulletins

May 2016 News Bulletin


Campbell’s soup cans to drop hormone-mimicking chemical. The iconic US soup maker will stop using Bisphenol-A by 2017, after the chemical was found in all 15 of its cans tested in a US survey. The Guardian. (See also coverage in the Daily Telegraph: Does canned food cause cancer? A leading UK cancer charity has written to major food manufacturers asking them to reveal details of their use of the controversial chemical BPA in food cans.)


Benign by design: how chemists aim to end pharmaceutical pollution of the environment. From antibiotics to hormones and pain killers – residue from drugs is found in wastewater, rivers, fish, and even in polar bear fat. But chemists say they may know how to end this environmental pollution. Deutsche Welle.


France to ban some glyphosate weedkillers amid health concerns. France’s health and safety agency is poised to ban weedkillers that combine chemicals glyphosate and tallowamine because of concerns over possible health risks. Reuters.


‘Breakthrough’ hailed in EDCs logjam. Scientific experts, from both sides of the endocrine debate, have agreed a “consensus statement” on identifying endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which will be passed to the European Commission to support its work compiling regulatory criteria. Chemical Watch.


Firefighters seek new law to ban flame retardants. Amid growing concern that flame retardants are responsible for elevated cancer rates in firefighters, Massachusetts lawmakers are pushing legislation that would go further than any other state’s in banning the use of chemicals meant to slow the spread of fires. Boston Globe.

https://healthandenvironmentonline.com/2016/05/20/may-2016-news-bulletin-soup-makers-drop-bpa-from-cans-french-ban-on-tallowamineglyphosate-formulations/
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AGelbert

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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #20 on: October 08, 2016, 02:53:02 pm »
 
Although jackfruit is still considered an exotic tropical fruit in the U.S., it is becoming more popular in the vegan and vegetarian circles as a meat substitute. After about one hour of cooking, unripened jackfruit starts to resemble the flavor and mouth-feel of pulled pork.     

What Is Jackfruit Good For? ??? 

 
Botanical name: Artocarpus heterophyllus

Having a distinct musky smell and deliciously sweet taste, jackfruit is a unique tropical fruit that is typically harvested during summer and fall.

It can grow to enormous sizes, measuring between 10 and 60 centimeters in length, 25 to 75 centimeters in diameter, and can weigh between 10 and 100 pounds, making it the largest tree-borne fruit in the world.

Specimens weighing more than 100 pounds have also been recorded.

Jackfruit originated from the rainforests of India’s Western Ghats and spread to other parts of the country, the East Indies and Southeast Asia. It is now planted in central and eastern Africa and has become quite popular in Brazil and Suriname. In Bangladesh, jackfruit is touted as the national fruit and it is considered the second-most important crop after mangoes.

The exotic jackfruit is green when unripe, and then turns light brown and spreads a strong fragrant smell once it is ripe. Like durian, jackfruit is round or oblong-shaped, and has an outer surface that is covered with blunt thorn-like projections that soften as the fruit ripens. Inside each fruit are hundreds of small, succulent yellow lobes. Most jackfruit trees can bear as many as 250 large fruits every season. The tree is used as timber as well.

Although jackfruit is still considered an exotic tropical fruit in the U.S., it is becoming more popular in the vegan and vegetarian circles as a meat substitute. After about one hour of cooking, unripened jackfruit starts to resemble the flavor and mouth-feel of pulled pork.

Health Benefits of Jackfruit 

Jackfruit is a nutritional bonanza: it is rich in vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber, which makes it a good natural laxative. It can help improve digestion, as adequate fiber can be an effective natural remedy to prevent constipation, and it can also benefit those who want to lose or maintain their weight by giving a feeling of fullness.

Jackfruit is also known to contain significant amounts of vitamin A and flavonoid pigments (carotene-ß, xanthin, lutein and cryptoxanthin-ß), offering antioxidant and vision support. As it is low in calories and sodium and does not contain cholesterol or unhealthy fats, its luscious fruit lobes make a healthy, appetizing treat you can relish.

The enigmatic fruit is rich in B-complex vitamins, containing niacin, pyridoxine, riboflavin and folic acid. It is a viable source of minerals, such as iron, magnesium, potassium and manganese as well.

As a good source of vitamin C — also a powerful antioxidant — jackfruit offers about 23 percent of the recommended daily allowance (RDA), which makes it useful in helping fight off infectious agents while scavenging harmful free radicals in the body.

However, consume jackfruit in moderation because it contains fructose, which may be harmful to your health in excessive amounts.

Jackfruit Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 3.5 ounces (100 grams),raw or frozen (at article link)


Studies on Jackfruit



A study published in the journal Plant Foods for Human Nutrition indicated that the pulp of jackfruit is a natural source of antioxidants that protect cells from free radical damage. This means the fruit can help slow down skin aging and can even assist in repairing damaged molecules, like DNA.1

Jackfruit contains lignans and saponins, which are beneficial phytonutrients that have been shown to offer anti-cancer properties. Lignans have been found to help block the effects of the hormone estrogen, which may decrease risk of hormone-associated cancers (uterine, ovarian, breast and prostate). Saponins, on the other hand, are known to optimize immune function and reduce risk of heart disease.2

Another study published in The Ceylon Medical Journal categorized jackfruit as a low-glycemic index fruit, which is attributed to its dietary fiber content.3 Consumption of unripe jackfruit can even be used to fight high blood sugar level, according to a Sydney University Glycemic Index Research Service study.4

 
Ripe Jackfruit

Researchers also regard jackfruit as a “miracle” food crop that could be a replacement for staple crops that are under threat from climate change. It is very easy to grow and can survive high temperatures, pests and diseases, and is even drought-resistant.

According to Shyamala Reddy, a biotechnology researcher at the University of Agriculture Sciences in Bangalore, India, the jackfruit is rich in calories and nutrients and if a person eats 10 to 12 bulbs, he or she won’t need food for another 12 hours. For these reasons, this fruit could be utilized to help save millions of people from hunger.5


Jackfruit Healthy Recipe: Easy Jackfruit Curry
healthy jackfruit recipe

Ingredients: Jicama Slaw
500 grams fresh jackfruit
2 medium tomatoes pureed
1 tsp. virgin coconut oil
½ tsp. cumin seeds
½ tsp. mustard seeds
½ tsp. nigella seeds
2 bay leaves
2 dried red chili peppers
1 small onion (chopped)
1 inch ginger (chopped)
1 tsp. coriander powder
½ tsp. turmeric
¼ tsp. black pepper
½ to ¾ tsp. Himalayan salt
1 to 1.5 cups of water

Procedure:

1.Heat extra virgin coconut oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the cumin, nigella and mustard seeds and let them sizzle for about a minute. Add the bay leaves and red chili peppers, and then cook for several seconds. Add the onion, garlic and ginger, and just a pinch of Himalayan salt. Cook until translucent (five to six minutes) and remember to mix occasionally.

2.Add the turmeric, coriander and black pepper, mixing well. Stir while adding the pureed tomato, jackfruit and the rest of the salt. Cover and cook for approximately 15 minutes.

3.Uncover and cook for another few minutes to make the tomato puree thicker. The jackfruit can also be shredded.

4.Add the water and then cover and cook for 15 minutes. Taste and adjust the flavor accordingly, then reduce the heat to medium low and cook for an extra 10 minutes or longer, until your desired consistency is achieved. Garnish with cilantro and serve.


Jackfruit Fun Facts

Jackfruit emits a sweet yet putrid stench that has been described as a combination of overripe bananas, onions  :P, pineapple and passion fruit. Like durian *, the giant fruit is banned in airports and plane cabins, but it isn’t prohibited as cargo.


 
*   durian



Summary

Jackfruit certainly brings something new to the table. Aside from its distinctive flavor, this interesting fruit also has an impressive nutritional profile that includes vitamins, antioxidants and phytonutrients. Researchers believe this tropical fruit could help solve the food shortage problem because it is high in calories, rich in fiber, virtually has no unhealthy fat and can even be grown very easily.

http://foodfacts.mercola.com/jackfruit.html

 
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AGelbert

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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #21 on: November 21, 2016, 01:22:08 pm »
The remarkable history and healing power of honey

Katherine Martinko (@feistyredhair)
Living / Green Food
 November 18, 2016

http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/remarkable-history-and-healing-power-honey.html


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AGelbert

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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2016, 02:59:47 pm »
Medical journal defends article  ;D on questionable science behind US dietary guidelines

SNIPPET:

Quote

“They were happy to condemn the article in general terms, but when I asked them to name just one of the supposed errors in it, not one of them was able to. One admitted he had not read it. Another told me she had signed the letter because the BMJ should not have published an article that was not peer reviewed (it was peer reviewed). Meir Stampfer, a Harvard epidemiologist, asserted that Teicholz’s work is ‘riddled with errors,  ;)’ while declining to discuss them with me.”

It’s difficult to argue with Teicholz’s evidence-based logic that rates of obesity in the U.S. shot upward in 1980, the very year in which dietary guidelines were introduced, and the diabetes epidemic kicked in shortly after. Nor is it acceptable for decisions about influential national nutrition policies to be decided by people who work within the food industry. Teicholz wrote:

“It may be time to ask our authorities to convene an unbiased and balanced panel of scientists to undertake a comprehensive review, in order to ensure that selection of the dietary guidelines committee becomes more transparent, with better disclosure of the conflicts of interest, and that the most rigorous scientific evidence is reliably used to produce the best possible nutrition policy.”

It appears she has won the battle this time round. 

http://www.treehugger.com/health/medical-journal-admits-us-dietary-guidelines-are-based-questionable-science.html

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AGelbert

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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #23 on: December 10, 2016, 02:04:02 pm »
But Don’t We Need Protein?

While we do need protein, perhaps we don’t need so much as we might think. The Center for Disease Control and Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine both agree we are getting plenty of protein and that protein deficiency is not a problem in our society, especially in comparison to the cancer problem we have.

The Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) even says that we actually get too much protein, around double of what we really need. They advise using the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) protein formula, which is : 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight for the average adult.

To find out your average individual need, multiply your body weight in pounds by your recommended protein intake in grams.

Are We Eating Too Much Protein? A Scientist Makes the Connection Between Protein and Cancer

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/t-colin-campbell-protein-and-cancer/
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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #24 on: December 17, 2016, 03:45:15 pm »

Is Your Olive Oil Fake?         ???


December 17, 2016 | 113,852 views | Available in Español Disponible en Español

Story at-a-glance

The popularity of the Mediterranean diet has made olive oil a $16 billion-a-year industry. Unfortunately, this popularity has also led to massive fraud and corruption.

Even "extra virgin" olive oil is often diluted with other less expensive oils, including hazelnut, soybean, corn, sunflower, palm, sesame, grape seed and/or walnut.
These added oils will not be listed on the label.  >:(

Tips on how to identify high quality olive oil include buying from specialty retailers that allow you to taste it first. Guidance on what to look for is included. Taste and smell are factors by which you discern authenticity.  8)


Full article with added explanatory videos:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/12/17/fake-olive-oil.aspx

Agelbert NOTE:
Watch out for the term "cold pressed" olive oil on the label. As the article points out. NO olive oil is cold pressed now. ALL olive oil is centrifuged. If you see "cold pressed" on the label, you are being lied to. That might indicate a proclivity to lie about content as well by that company...


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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #25 on: January 28, 2017, 07:48:15 pm »
Where Do We Get Our Biological Energy?
Water Supports Health in Ways You May Never Have Suspected

January 28, 2017 | 176,023 views

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/01/28/ez-water.aspx
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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #26 on: February 09, 2017, 10:04:28 pm »
Peas Are the Future of Protein – Here’s Why

Kat Smith   
January 26, 2017   

It’s no secret that we’re kind of obsessed with protein. Studies have shown that the average person in a developed country consumes 103 grams of protein a day — more than double the recommended daily intake, most of which come from animal protein. Unfortunately, our appetite for animal-based protein has a devastating impact on the planet. Luckily, as more people come to recognize how meat and dairy can negatively impact not only the health of the planet but their own as well, the demand for clean, plant-based protein is on the rise. The plant-based protein market is estimated to reach a value of $5.2 billion by 2020 and plant-based meat alternatives could make up one-third of the entire market by 2050. In keeping with this trend, one company just took a huge step in leading the change.

Last week Roquette, a French, family-owned company, announced it will build the world’s largest pea processing plant in Manitoba, Canada. Roquette has been around since the 1930s and currently specializes in producing sustainable products in the pharmaceutical, health, food, nutrition, feed, pet food spaces. This new plant will be dedicated to making pea protein, a high-protein, low-fat, and allergen-friendly alternative to animal protein. According to Roquette chair Edward Roquette, “it is the largest global investment dedicated to pea protein to date. And it constitutes a key pillar of our strategy in plant protein in general and in pea protein in particular.”

It’s not just Roquette that’s responding to the demand for plant-based protein — more companies than ever have embraced pea protein. Last year, Ripple Foods launched a line of plant-based milks made from pea protein while the maker’s of Muscle Milk released Evolve, a plant-based protein shake made from pea protein. 2016 also saw the launch of the Beyond Burger, a pea protein-based burger that contains 20 grams of protein per patty. Now, Roquette’s processing plant will be a fantastic step forward into the future of protein, making pea protein more easily available than ever. Construction of the world’s largest pea processing plant is set to begin later this year.

There’s no turning back from here. As the world’s population continues to grow and more developing nations start to demand more meat and dairy, we need to realize that animal protein cannot sustain a world of meat eaters. As Nil Zacharias, Co-Founder of One Green Planet, has said, “advancements in plant-protein are the kind of technological innovations the world desperately needs. In fact, it may be one of the only real shots we have to make our future on this planet possible.” If we hope to feed the growing demand for protein, we need to move ahead into the future of food with more plant-based options like pea protein.   



http://www.onegreenplanet.org/news/peas-are-the-future-of-protein/
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AGelbert

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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #27 on: February 20, 2017, 04:51:38 pm »

How Eating the Rainbow Can Help Protect Against Cancer

SNIPPET:

Start by replacing your processed or animal-based meals with foods from each color segment below and check out their benefits on their ability to fight cancer.

Green:


Fruits and vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, kale, turnips, cauliflower, asparagus, collards, mustard greens, green apples, fresh herbs, zucchini, turnip greens, spinach, and Brussels sprouts contain either antioxidants known as flavones and/or indoles which have been directly linked to the prevention against cancer. They also contain high amounts of chlorophyll that prevents acidity in the body. Soybeans, green peas, and green beans are also high in antioxidants that support immune health even further.

Yellow/Orange:

Fruits and vegetables such as pumpkin, squash, peaches, yellow and orange bell peppers, lemons, cantaloupe, sweet potatoes, grapefruit, papaya, and apricots all contain especially high levels of Vitamin C for immune health, along with beta-carotene, a nutrient derived from the carotenoids found in these plants that give them their colorful hue. Studies have shown that women who eat carotenoid-rich vegetables reduce their breast cancer risk by up to 19 percent!

Red/Orange:

Fruits like watermelon, tomatoes, red peppers, papaya, grapefruit, and guava, all contain lycopene that also reduces the risks for prostate cancer and heart disease. Lycopene has also been shown to lower high cholesterol that can lead to increased fat cells that stimulate cancer cell growth.

Red/Blue/Purple:

Blue and purple foods like berries, figs, beets, pomegranates, grapes, raisins, and plums, all contain high levels of antioxidants known as anthocyanins or polyphenols that protect the heart and prevent heart disease. Their intake has also been linked to the prevention of certain types of cancers, according to The American Cancer Society.

White/Tan/Brown:

If you think white vegetables don’t count, think again! They are rich in antioxidants known as phytochemicals like allicin (garlic and onions), beans and legumes (that contain fiber to reduce cholesterol and obesity), quercetin (onions and apples), selenium (mushrooms), Vitamin C (onions, apples, and parsnips), and a variety of vitamins and minerals that support the immune system (banana flesh, white nectarines, white peaches, cauliflower, artichokes, and potatoes.) Selenium was found to be one of the most prominent minerals for mens’ prostate health while garlic and onions remain as two of the top foods to boost the immune system and fight cancer cell growth.

There are so many ways to add fruits and vegetables to your diet. Here are a few great suggestions:




http://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/how-eating-the-rainbow-can-help-protect-against-cancer/
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AGelbert

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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #28 on: May 03, 2017, 06:59:32 pm »
The Cholesterol Myth Has Been Busted — Yet Again

May 03, 2017 • 96,863 views

cholesterol myth

Story at-a-glance
-

A 40-year-old previously unpublished trial shows that while replacing saturated fat with vegetable oil lowered total cholesterol by 14 percent, for every 30 point drop in total cholesterol there was a 22 percent increased chance of death

Many other trials have also found that replacing saturated fats with vegetable oils increase mortality risk from all causes, including coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease

Processed vegetable oils contribute to devastating attacks to your health and attacks your brain in several ways, thereby contributing to and worsening neurologic disorders

SNIPPET:

By Dr. Mercola

For the past four decades, the U.S. government has warned that eating cholesterol-rich foods such as eggs would raise your LDL cholesterol (inappropriately referred to as "bad" cholesterol) and promote heart disease.

Alas, decades' worth of research utterly failed to demonstrate this correlation, and the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans1,2,3,4,5 finally addressed this scientific shortcoming, announcing "cholesterol is not considered a nutrient of concern for overconsumption."6

This is good news, since dietary cholesterol plays an important role in brain health and memory formation, and is indispensable for the building of cells and the production of stress and sex hormones, as well as vitamin D. (When sunlight strikes your bare skin, the cholesterol in your skin is converted into vitamin D.)

Unfortunately, the dietary guidelines still cling to outdated misinformation about saturated fat, wrongly accusing it of raising LDL and contributing to heart disease. Here, science has shown that saturated fat only raises the safe, fluffy LDL particles. It also increases HDL, which is beneficial for your heart.

The guidelines became and are still confusing because the basic premise was wrong. Dietary fat is indeed associated with heart disease, but it's the processed vegetable oils, which are loaded with trans fats and oxidized omega-6 fats, that are the problem , not saturated fats.

The introduction of industrialized, highly processed and frequently heated omega-6 vegetable oils distorted the vitally important omega 6-to-3 ratio, causing metabolic catastrophes. The problem was further exacerbated by replacing saturated fat with refined carbohydrates, which were incorrectly viewed as a healthier option, thanks to misinformation created and spread by the sugar industry.

Full must read article:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/05/03/cholesterol-myth-busted.aspx


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AGelbert

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Re: Healthy Eating
« Reply #29 on: May 07, 2017, 07:05:06 pm »

Is Aluminum Foil Safe to Use in Cooking?  ???   


By Helen West

Aluminum foil is a common household product that's often used in cooking.

Some claim that using aluminum foil in cooking can cause aluminum to seep into your food and put your health at risk.

However, others say it's entirely safe to use.

This article explores the risks associated with using aluminum foil and determines whether or not it is acceptable for everyday use.

 

http://www.ecowatch.com/aluminum-foil-cooking-2394046382.html
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