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Author Topic: Fighting Infection  (Read 232 times)

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AGelbert

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Fighting Infection
« on: June 21, 2014, 12:20:47 am »
Are Leeches Really Used in Modern Medicine?


Leeches are still used in modern medicine, although the bloodsucking worms' medicinal use has declined since the mid-19th century, when it was thought that removing blood would help cure diseases. In 2004, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved leeches for use in recovery treatment of skin grafts and other body part attachments. Leeches draw blood from the body when applied, which is thought to prevent blood from building up underneath a skin graft. They also are used to help recirculate blood in the case of blocked veins that sometimes occur after reconstructive reattachment surgery.

More about historical medicine:

•Heroin was used as a cough suppressant from 1898 until 1924, when the addictive nature of the ingredient was discovered.

•In the early 1900s, radiation was considered to have healing properties and was used in products for a range of conditions, including wrinkles and arthritis. The dangers of radiation became well known after the death of prominent American tennis player and industrialist Eben Byers, who said he drank three bottles of radium-laced water each day.  :P

 

Agelbert Note: Of course the pro-nuclear advocates never got the word and that's how "nuclear Medicine" was born as a way to charge for nuclear power plant "products". It's interesting that the "radiation is good for you"  LETHAL SCAM predates the bomb.


•Eye drops containing bird dung were used from the 16th century through the 18th century to help treat eye infections. ;D

Agelbert Note: Remember this one? "Look up in the sky! It's a bird!? It's  a Plane!? splotch! It's a BIRD!"  :P -> If you never watched "Superman" on TV, ya don't get it!  ;D

http://www.wisegeek.com/are-leeches-really-used-in-modern-medicine.htm
« Last Edit: May 06, 2017, 08:55:44 pm by AGelbert »
But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

AGelbert

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Re: Fighting Infection
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2017, 08:54:14 pm »
How Was Moss Used on the Battlefields of World War I?

In 1915, with World War I raging and casualties mounting, Britain's military doctors were faced with an outbreak of sepsis, a life-threatening byproduct of infection, and a shortage of cotton, which was crucial for making bandages. It was during this time of need that two Scotsmen -- botanist Isaac Bayley Balfour and surgeon Charles Walker Cathcart -- proposed the idea of making absorbent and antiseptic dressings out of sphagnum moss, also known as peat moss, which has been used throughout history to keep wounds clean. The idea was a life-saver for besieged soldiers and doctors. Balfour and Cathcart helped identify two moss species -- S. papillosum and S. palustre -- that worked best for controlling bleeding and helping wounds heal.


S. papillosum typically forms dense carpets and is commonly found growing in lawns of poor fens and rarely occurs in bogs.


Life-saving moss on the battlefield:

•In an effort to stave off infections and sepsis, military doctors had tried everything from irrigating wounds with chlorine solutions to creating bandages infused with carbolic acid, formaldehyde  or mercury chloride  :P , with varying degrees of success.  ;)

•There are ancient accounts that warriors in the battle of Clontarf outside Dublin in 1014 used moss to pack wounds. It was also used by Native Americans, who lined children’s cradles and carriers with moss -- rather like a natural diaper.  ;D

•Moss was also used during other conflicts, including the Napoleonic and Franco-Prussian wars. But it wasn’t until World War I that medical experts realized the plant's full potential.

http://www.wisegeek.com/how-was-moss-used-on-the-battlefields-of-world-war-i.htm
But Peter said unto him, Thy money perish with thee, because thou
hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money. Acts 8:20

 

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